The Epidemic of Ethnic Rape

Sharon Lapkin, FrontPageMagazine.com, Dec. 27, 2005

In Australia, Norway and Sweden there is a distinct race-based crime in which Islamic men are raping Western women for ethnic reasons. We know this because the rapists have openly declared their sectarian motivations.

A number of teenaged Australian girls were subjected to hours of sexual degradation during a spate of gang rapes in Sydney that occurred between 1998 and 2002. And the perpetrators of these assaults framed the rationale for their actions in explicitly ethnic terms. The young victims were informed that they were “sluts” and “Aussie pigs” while they were being hunted down and abused.

In the NSW Supreme Court in December 2005, a visiting Pakistani rapist testified that his victims had no right to say no because they were not wearing a headscarf.

And earlier this year Australians were outraged when Lebanese Sheik Faiz Mohammed gave a lecture in Sydney where he informed his audience that rape victims had no one to blame but themselves. Women, he said, who wore skimpy clothing, invited men to rape them.

A few months earlier, in Copenhagen, Islamic mufti and scholar, Shahid Mehdi created uproar when—like his peer in Australia—he stated that women who did not wear a headscarf were asking to be raped.

And with haunting synchronicity in 2004, the London Telegraph reported that visiting Egyptian scholar Sheik Yusaf al-Qaradawi claimed female rape victims should be punished if they were dressed immodestly when they were raped. And he added, “For her to be absolved from guilt, a raped woman must have shown good conduct”.

In Norway and Sweden, journalist Fjordman informs us of a rape epidemic. Police Inspector Gunnar Larsen stated that the steady increase of rape-cases and the link to ethnicity are clear, unmistakable trends. Two out of three persecutions for rape in Oslo are immigrants with a non-Western background and eighty per cent of the victims are Norwegian women.

In Sweden, according to translator for Jihad Watch, Ali Dashti, “ Gang rapes, usually involving Muslim immigrant males and native Swedish girls, have become commonplace.” A few weeks ago she said, “5 Kurds brutally raped a 13-year-old Swedish girl.”

Unfortunately, Western women are not the only victims in this epidemic. In Indonesia, in 1998, human rights groups documented the testimony of over 100 Chinese women who were gang raped during the riots that preceded the fall of President Suharto. Many of them were told: “You must be raped because you are Chinese and non-Muslim”.

Christian Solidarity Worldwide reported that in April 2005, a 9-year-old Pakistani girl was raped, beaten with a cricket bat, hung upside down from the ceiling, had spoonfuls of chillies poured into her mouth and been handcuffed and repeatedly bashed. Her Muslim neighbours told her they were taking revenge for the American bombing of Iraqi children and informed her they were doing it because she was an “infidel and a Christian”.

In Sudan—where Arab Muslims slaughter black Muslim and Christian Sudanese in the ongoing genocide—former Sudanese slave and now a human rights’ activist, Simon Deng, says he witnessed girls and women being raped and that the Arab regime of Khartoum sends its soldiers to the field to rape and murder. In other reports, women who are captured by government forces are asked; “Are you Christian or Muslim?” and those who answer Christian, are gang-raped before having their breasts cut off.

In France, Samira Bellil broke her silence—after enduring years of repeated gang rapes in one of the Muslim populated public housing projects—and wrote a book, In the hell of the tournantes, that shocked France. Describing how gang rape is rampant in the banlieues, she explained to Time that, “any neighborhood girl who smokes, uses makeup or wears attractive clothes is a whore.”

This phenomenon of Islamic sexual violence against women should be addressed urgently. But instead we find journalists, academics and politicians ignoring it, rationalising it or ostracising those who dare to discuss it.

In Australia, when journalist Paul Sheehan reported honestly on the Sydney gang rapes, he was called a racist and accused of stirring up anti-Muslim hatred. And when he reported in his Sydney Morning Herald column that there was a high incidence of crime amongst Sydney’s Lebanese community, fellow journalist, David Marr sent him an email that said, “That is a disgraceful column that reflects poorly on us all at the Herald.”

Keysar Trad, vice-president of the Australian Lebanese Muslim Association said the gang rapes were a “heinous” crime but complained it was “rather unfair” that the ethnicity of the rapists had been reported.

Journalist Miranda Devine reported during the same rape trials that all reference to ethnicity had been deleted from the victim impact statement because the prosecutors wanted to negotiate a plea bargain.

So when Judge Megan Latham declared that “There is no evidence before me of any racial element in the commission of these offences.” Everybody believed her. And the court, the politicians and most of the press, may as well have raped the girls again.

Retired Australian detective, Tim Priest, warned in 2004 that the Lebanese gangs, which emerged in Sydney, in the 1990s—when the police were asleep—had morphed out of control. “The Lebanese groups,” he said, “ were ruthless, extremely violent, and they intimidated not only innocent witnesses, but even the police that attempted to arrest them.”

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