Henry Louis Gates: “Since Slavery Ended, All Political Movements Have Been About Race”

Daniel D'Addario, Salon, October 20, 2013

Henry Louis Gates is on a mission to change how race is taught in America.

The Harvard professor of African and African-American studies is among the most public thinkers on the issue of race in the nation; his stature is only set to grow with the PBS series “Many Rivers to Cross,” which begins airing on Oct. 22. The six-part series considers the black experience in America from many angles, starting from the beginning of the North American slave trade.

Gates intends the series to help teach race in what he considers to be an utterly ineffective school system; he’s quick to cite studies indicating that black history is not being taught well in schools. {snip}

But the real conversation Gates wants to be having is one about class. He spoke to Salon about the degree to which the end of legal segregation led to the splintering of the civil rights movement as well as to further inequities on a national level, and what the government needs to do to ensure a fair shot for all citizens. {snip}

{snip}

I’m kind of curious the degree to which you think we as a nation—especially students—are at risk of forgetting slavery. I wonder if this series has to exist and things like it have to exist to remind people?

I think of this as a black history series for your generation. A generation that didn’t see “Roots” when it was being shown every night creating a national phenomenon. A very cosmopolitan generation, technologically savvy. Less concerned about race as an individual basis than any generation before it. And more integrated–socially integrated, whether it’s images on television or as the definition of American popular culture adds the African-American element as its lingua franca.

{snip}

Teachers need tools to integrate the content about the black experience. And this series is the only one crazy enough to do what turned out to be 500 years of African-American history. Starting, as you saw, with Juan Gurito, first black man to set foot on what is now Florida in 1513 with Ponce De Leon looking for the fountain of youth. All the way to Obama’s, President Obama’s second inauguration. Heretofore, teachers would have to use “Eyes on the Prize,” which is on the civil rights era, and “Slavery in America,” and “Freedom Riders” by Stanley Nelson, and something on the Harlem Renaissance. So what I decided to do was tell the story in one series using salient stories–70 stories over the six episodes, which were exemplary of the whole larger experience. So I worked for seven years on the series, and we gained 30 or 40 stories. When we started, we had a list of the indispensable, canonical stories that any series would have to tell. [laughs] And so we spent years whittling down the stories to be the essential ones, and that’s what we came up with.

{snip}

Does it drive you crazy when people refer to ours as a post-racial society?

It drives me nuts! I can’t even imagine what it means. I don’t even want to be in a post-racial society. You know, I’m a professor of African studies and African-American studies, and I do very popular PBS television shows, in terms of excavating people’s roots …

What’s your heritage, by the way? Your ancestral heritage? You’re Italian?

Yes.

And it’s very important. It was very important to Mario Batali when I introduced him to excavated ancestors of hundreds of years. It’s crucial. I don’t want there to be a time when we’re colorless. I just don’t want your Italian heritage and my African heritage and Irish heritage, in my case, to be used to limit your possibilities or mine to limit my possibilities. When you could wear your ancestry, your sexual preference, your gender orientation, your religion, your color, what have you–you can wear it without penalty. And that’s what, that’s what situation we haven’t achieved in this country. It still matters that you are black or gay or a woman or Jewish, and I’m sure Italian, in some contexts. {snip}

How would you change the manner of how history, and particularly racial history, is taught? If you had the opportunity to put into place your own curriculum all across America, what would you do?

I would do two things. One: African-American history would be completely, thoroughly integrated into American history. That’s not yet done sufficiently. So that the story would be much more complex. We need the story of George Washington, but we need the story of his slave at the same time. Which is the story we told in Episode 1. Metaphorically, if you have “American Bandstand,” you need to have “Soul Train,” which is what we do in Episode 6.

There’s too much whitewashing of our founders, for example. George Washington has more slaves than any other president, than the first five presidents, and didn’t free them until his deathbed. We need to tell these stories without blame and show how complex our heroes of American history were. The second thing we need to do, I would like to see, in some states, black history courses mandated. I would like to see that done. In part because black history has been excluded for so long, and because it is such a fundamental part of American history, that we have to do a dramatic corrective. So I would like to see a high school class—I wouldn’t do it until then—a high school class on African-American history mandated throughout the country.

A lot of organizations like the NAACP seem to have lost some of their status as thought-leaders. They’re not where people turn for information or for advocacy first, necessarily. And I’m wondering if a certain sense of solidarity has been lost and if that’s a bad thing.

I think that the problems of race and class have been, are so inextricably intertwined–but because of segregation, because of legal segregation, our political organizations only identified race as a cause. So once segregation was dismantled with Brown v. Board of Education, and the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act of 1965, et cetera, there was a naive belief that all African-Americans would plunge headlong into the middle class. But that’s obviously not what happened. And as I’ve said and you know, affirmative action created an upper middle class, which I’m a part of, and all those people were left behind. So I think that the leaders of our traditional civil rights organizations have been scrambling for a new analysis.

Because if you think about it, since slavery ended, all political movements have been about race. If you think about the economics of the Black Panthers but they were annihilated, right. There were black socialists in the 1920s under A. Philips Randolph, and there were black Communists. And I’m certainly not advocating Communism or socialism, but they were at least talking about the role of economics even if they didn’t get it right. Martin Luther King only at the end was talking about it—despite the fact that the March on Washington was for jobs, and equality, specifically, in employment. It was only at the end that he was realizing that race was only part of the issue. I would say that the traditional organizations like the NAACP, which was under the great leadership of Benjamin Jealous, and Marc Morial and the Urban League, etc. They are reformulating the agenda and they are still in the process of doing that.

Have we lost unity? Yes. I think that the black community, like other ethnic communities, has 100 percent unity when it comes to a race issue. When it comes to voting in a black president, it was overwhelming, 95 percent unity. When it comes to the class differences within the race, there is a lot of variation in lifestyle, possibility, where your kids go to school, how they’re treated where you live. Whereas before you could have a doctor and a maid living next door to one another because the neighborhoods were segregated. So yes, to answer your question, the black community has become fissured in ways that generations before the 1960s couldn’t imagine. Culture—shared cultural values—creates more of an illusion of unity, which is belied by economic differences, life choices, responsibility. One of the places in my series to show that there has always been a variation, a lack of unity in the black experience. From the time the first few black people showed up, some were free and others were slaves. And that’s a difference between 1513 and 1528, so I wanted to show that diversity.

Nobody talks about how there are more black Americans than there are Canadians, but everybody talks about “the black community.” Nobody in their right mind talks about “the Canadian community” as though all Canadians are going to speak with one voice and one mind. But on the other hand, that’s how we talk about black Americans. And black America is just too diverse for that. I think that because of that and because of the economic diversity today, there is a lot of nostalgia for the world of segregation, when it seems like the community was more unified. But the challenge is for our political leaders to formulate an agenda that takes into account race and class. And that is what we’re seeing today.

Can I go back to the little riff I wanted to make about the conversation on race?

Sure.

Everyone talks about the “conversation on race.” Every time we need a “conversation on race.” The only place where a meaningful conversation with long-term impact can happen is in the schools, and can only happen if nobody uses the words “conversation about race.” What do I mean by that? Schools are the vehicle to create citizenship and you learn it osmotically. Nobody says, “Daniel, I’m going to teach you to be a good citizen.” You learn the Pledge of Allegiance, “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,” “America the Beautiful,” George Washington chopped down the cherry tree and never told a lie. All of this is how we become citizens. And what’s been left out of that conversation is race, honest conversations about race. But not feel-good talk. I’m talking about [the slave] Harry Washington and George. I’m talking about the economic role of slavery in the creation of America. The fact that the richest cotton-growing soil happened to be inhabited by five civilized tribes, what they called themselves, and that had to be exterminated, removed and or exterminated for the greatest economic boom in American history to occur. The Trail of Tears, the cotton boom from 1820 to 1860. I’m not talking about politically correct history, I’m talking about correct history. I just made that up—I have to write that down.

That’s how to have a conversation about race, when it happens every day, it happens every day osmotically. Just in the atmosphere, as a normal part of the discourse in the classroom talking about shaking up America. Instead of–I’m 63, and the only black history we ever got was called “Slavery Day” and the teacher would say, “Well, there was slavery and it was the best thing to happen to you people. You were eating each other and swinging through trees.” I went to an integrated school in 1956. And it was embarrassing, I didn’t know anything about black history until Bill Cosby’s in 1968, really. So I want this series to contribute to real conversation in the classroom precisely by making it unnecessary to use those specific words.

{snip}

I don’t know if you saw protesters waving the Confederate flag in front of the White House. Will the Republican Party make it difficult to implement a jobs bill of the sort you propose, one that would help particularly the black middle class or lower middle class, because of a sort of inherent racism? Can they outgrow that in a matter of time?

I would say I know many Republicans who aren’t racist, and I wouldn’t want anyone to think that I was equating being a Republican with being a racist. But I know that the criticisms of Obama are definitely rooted in anti-black racism. And I think it is incumbent upon both the left and the right to see part of the problem and figure out how to help poor people, how to help working-class people, whether they’re black or white. Even affirmative action. I grew up with poor white people in the hills of West Virginia, I want affirmative action applied to them as well. When I started at Yale in 1969, affirmative action was a class escalator. And I want to see affirmative action be a class escalator for everyone, not just black people.

But again, it goes back to the classroom. You can’t just call these people out and say, “You’re a racist,” and expect them to change. In children, you get them in the classroom in first grade and we’re teaching them the nobility of the human spirit in black faces as well as white faces and not drawing attention to it; we’ll be showing them through a truly integrated curriculum that is the last great hope for the obliteration of racism in America. Because American popular culture has been integrated since the 1950s and 1960s, and under hip-hop in an extraordinary sense. It’s not like white racists don’t listen to black music, or cheer on black athletes, or attend movies with black characters. There’s a kind of switch that turns off; the switch is called economic fear. The people are threatened, they’re afraid for the future of their children. If you’re afraid. If I have I pie, and I have enough to go around, Mr. D’Addario, you are welcome to come to dinner. But if I think that you eating my pie is going to keep me from eating it, or my children, I’m sorry. Not only are you not going to come to dinner, but I also might be talking bad about Italians.

And that’s what happens. Under Lyndon Johnson we had guns and butter, we thought we had enough prosperity to put everybody in the middle class, and as soon as that dream fell apart, people once again started demonizing one another. Slavery was about economic relations, it was easy to demonize a group of people who looked so starkly different. As scarcity increases, so will racism. So will anti-Semitism. So will homophobia. That’s why schools are essential in countering the kinds of attitudes, unfortunate attitudes, children pick up in their living rooms from their parents.

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  • Andy

    “I’m kind of curious the degree to which you think we as a nation—especially students—are at risk of forgetting slavery.”

    Not any time soon, pal.

    “I think of this as a black history series for your generation. A generation that didn’t see “Roots” when it was being shown every night creating a national phenomenon.”

    Nothing like a good, educational hoax.

    “That’s why schools are essential in countering the kinds of attitudes, unfortunate attitudes, children pick up in their living rooms from their parents.”

    Because everyone knows the government knows better than parents.

  • Henry Louis Gates is on a mission to change how race is taught in America.

    Because Kluxers are writing race curricula for public schools.

    I’m kind of curious the degree to which you think we as a nation—especially students—are at risk of forgetting slavery.

    There is a risk that students will forget about slavery, especially since teaching about slavery has now been reduced to 5 hours a day from its previous 6 hours a day.

    A generation that didn’t see “Roots” when it was being shown every night creating a national phenomenon.

    Incidentally, crime was very low while “Roots” was showing. However, the blacks were so hyped up on the lies and agitprop that once it was over and they were back to their usual ways, they were even more angry.

    I don’t even want to be in a post-racial society. You know, I’m a professor of African studies and African-American studies, and I do very popular PBS television shows, in terms of excavating people’s roots

    He just turned over his deck of cards. It’s not that he doesn’t want to live in a post-racial society (even though I think such a thing is impossible), it’s that he can’t afford to live in a post-racial society.

    And as I’ve said and you know, affirmative action created an upper middle class, which I’m a part of, and all those people were left behind.

    Funny, talk about turning over your hand…

    Because if you think about it, since slavery ended, all political movements have been about race.

    He’s more right than he knows. I wish more white people would learn that lesson about themselves.

    Even affirmative action. I grew up with poor white people in the hills of West Virginia, I want affirmative action applied to them as well.

    And I’ll believe that when I see it, though I know I won’t.

    • Sentinel9

      And I’ll believe that when I see it, though I know I won’t.

      It’s Nixonian. He wants potentially rebellious intelligent hicks to be re-educated at Columbia before they can cause any trouble.

      • Except Columbia isn’t letting the “rebellious intelligent hicks” in. There was a recent study that showed that if you applied to an Ivy and you had typically rural red state activities on your resume, such as 4-H, FFA, Scouts, etc., your application was as good as in File 13.

  • David Ashton

    Cheer up, crackers! You are in for Black Slavery museums on almost the same scale as Holocaust museums. And pay for them.

    • Andy

      All the students in my school system growing up head down to DC and visit the Holocaust Museum. It wasn’t until college that it occurred to me:

      1) Why does *America* have a Holocaust Museum?
      2) Why do we spend months studying the Holocaust and then head to that museum?

      • IstvanIN

        …..because we are all guilty.

        • So CAL Snowman

          Even though OUR fathers and grand fathers fought and defeated the Germans in WW2!

          • Sentinel9

            They were only following orders.

          • stewball

            I beg to differ. I’m not talking about you or the Brits but occupied countries did their bit to help nazi Germany.

          • stewball

            Have you ever spoken to American soldiers who liberated the camps to see how they felt?

        • Erasmus

          …..because we are all guilty.

          Like hell we are. I am happy to be in the emerging vanguard prepared to tell Abe Foxman and Henry Louis Gates to get stuffed.

          • stewball

            What’s Abe Foxman done? I’m being serious. I’m not American.

        • stewball

          Actually you could blame Roosevelt. It was mainly him who left them to be murdered. As did my Brits and other countries. There were some who made an effort even though forbidden by their government. Not all closed their eyes and ears.

      • Katherine McChesney

        We have several Holocaust Museums. I toured the one in Beverly Hills. The docent actually had a bragaddocio attitude about the Holocaust. I suppose that’s expected in the Sh**h business. She even had a bad attitude toward Southerners. I suppose she got her information about the Civil War from black in the Snivel Rights Movement.

        • 48224

          I know a jewish guy who also dislikes southerners. Where we are from in Appalachia, religious whites think jews are the chosen people….they love jews. leftist northern jews are totally unaware of this.

          • Jesse James

            I was raised a Southern Methodist and I can vouch for the fact that many white Southerners are taught to revere Israel and “God’s Chosen People”. You would almost think they wrote the Book !

            I think one reason so many Jews, especially Northern Jews, dislike Southerners in general and Georgian’s in particular is because we pulled the convicted rapist and murderer Leo Frank out of jail and lynched him when it looked like Jewish influence was going to get his sentence commuted. I don’t know if he was guilty or not but it is interesting to read about the case. I always thought the liberal Jews would have given us some points for not lynching the black suspect in the case for once.

          • Alexandra1973

            I support the NATION of Israel, not the STATE of Israel (which is not run for the benefit of the Jews). That does not mean I approve of their rejection of their Messiah.

            Currently we are in the times of the Gentiles. After believers (Jews and Gentiles) are caught up, it’ll be time for the Great Tribulation, also known as the time of Jacob’s trouble. The Jews who have rejected their Messiah will be dealt with during this time.

          • stewball

            Ooh. How will we be dealt with seeing that the messiah hasn’t come yet riding his white ass into Jerusalem. Which was how jesus got to Jerusalem for the passover.
            Tell me. Has he brought peace? Nope.

          • stewball

            Christianity and. Catholicismtturned up about 200 years after the death of jesus so by what right did they have for hijacking our boy?

          • Erasmus

            If white southerners are taught to revere God’s chosen people, then they should realize that modern Judaism is NOT the religion of Jesus. If they really believe in Christ’s mission, then they have at least as much right to claim that they’re the heirs to the divine covenant as the Jews.

          • stewball

            Huh? Jesus was a jew like all of us. He was circumcisedon the 8th day after his birth im Jerusalem. He had the same upbringing of all the other Jews in Israel at the time. Why should we believe in Christ? He has no relevance to our religion.

          • stewball

            I very much doubt that is the reason. There must be another. Another religion not like yours. That don’t like them e.g. the catholics?

          • stewball

            You know there are Jews who don’t like the southernersfor some treason and there are southernersewho don’t like the Jews for some reason. It’s not all black and white. You know. Good and bad in every society.

          • Jesse James

            I understand and agree with you about the good and bad in all stew but my point about Leo Frank is that he was found guilty NOT because he was a Jew but because he was guilty. The anti-semitism charges that have surrounded this case from the beginning are a smoke screen of bull that has been burning for a hundred years. Read the American Mercury article and do some research. Sometimes a person is guilty because of a crime they have committed, just because they belong to a privileged group doesn’t give them a free pass.

      • David Ashton

        Several answers to your question are possible, but I would like to make one observation which has been expressed also by rabbis as well as revisionists.

        These resemble sacred temples of a new post-christian religion in the west: the Crucifixion of the Chosen People and their Resurrection in Israel, with Gentiles required to make Atonement for eternal guilt as preparers, perpetrators, bystanders, deniers, condoners, minimisers, detractors, actual or potential haters, etc.

    • sbuffalonative

      And in both cases, the majority of people who go to them are the students who are bused in for school outings. Without forcing kids to go to these museums, attendance would be a handful of people each day.

      Museums used to show us the beauty and vision of life as seen through the work of artists. Today, artists are driven by largely left-wing ‘progressive’ ideologies and museums are their political forums.

      • David Ashton

        Not only that: some museums have abandoned artefacts of past civilization for videos and videos to keep children of all ages “interested” but of course neither educated nor inspired.

  • sbuffalonative

    Mr. Gates thought he was going to re-write the black experience with “Wonders of the African World”. He didn’t. No one cared. In fact, blacks turned on him when he had the audacity to interview descendants of AFRICAN SLAVE TRADERS. Blacks don’t like anyone bringing up the topic of black’s involvement in selling ‘their brothers and sisters’ into slavery.

    Mr. Gates and all these elitist blowhards always believe they’re come up with THE answer to race. They never do because they deliberately ignore the issue of racial-genetic differences.

    “Nobody says, “Daniel, I’m going to teach you to be a good citizen.” You learn the Pledge of Allegiance, “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,” “America the Beautiful,” George Washington chopped down the cherry tree and never told a lie. All of this is how we become citizens.

    Mr. Gates is showing his age. I doubt any of those are taught in schools today.

    • Andy

      The only time I heard about GW and the cherry tree at school was when my high school teachers mocked it and told us (for the first time, they seemed to think) about that Founding Father’s slaves.

  • Jesse James

    To a negro everything is always and forever about race. Most of the rest of us would be happy just to get on with life but I guess that is just never going to happen. Just don’t forget black folk that we whites are starting to count the historic and ever continuing acts of savagery by your people against ours. We could build a wall with more names than the Vietnam Veterans memorial of whites murdered by blacks.

    • sbuffalonative

      They’re obsessed by the topic because they’re always trying to figure out what went wrong for them and why can’t they fix it.

      The answer is found in the one place they refuse to look, their genes.

      • So CAL Snowman

        “because they’re always trying to figure out what went wrong for them”

        Um, when did it ever go “right” for them?

        • sbuffalonative

          Exactly. And they can’t figure it out because it’s the one answer they refuse to accept. Hence, perpetually blaming whites for their problems when they have always had their problem; their problem is them.

  • JohnEngelman

    An accurate black history will include mention of the fact that blacks have never created indigenous civilizations, that in recent times they have never created well functioning societies, and that that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the war on poverty begun the same year were followed by five years of black ghetto rioting and more enduring increases in black social pathology.

    Students learning the truth about black history will be taught that in the United States blacks have a rate of violent crime that is eight times the white rate. They will be taught that black academic performance has hardly improved at all since the end of school segregation.

    • A Freespeechzone

      It’s not about accuracy…but a redesign of history to make blacks feel better about themselves—while reinforcing how evil Whites were and are.

      Yet another justifiable excuse for unprovoked, violent attacks on Whites….

    • MBlanc46

      Oops, John, not that honest conversation about race.

    • me

      The ‘truth’ about Bantu pathology will be taught in school when Bigfoot is voted president.

    • 48224

      I would correct Dr. Gates on one point. Not every political movement has been about race. EVERY issue is about race when you are black. EVERY issue….political, economic, education, welfare, global warming (whitey did it), crime, the weather…..you name it and blacks think it’s race related.

      • Brian

        Don’t forget astronomy, with its black holes and white and brown dwarfs, red giants.

  • Spartacus

    “…he’s quick to cite studies indicating that black history is not being taught well in schools.”

    ———————————————————————————————————————

    There is no such thing as “black history” ! YOU CAN’T HAVE A HISTORY IF YOU NEVER EVEN INVENTED A WRITTEN LANGUAGE !

  • So CAL Snowman

    So in the end, Louis Gates is just ANOTHER disingenuous anti-White hustler. Sunrise, sunset.

    • Brian

      He’s intelligent enough (37% black) to have a conversation and acknowledge some points though. At least he’s not one of the dashikied Afrocentrist numbskulls prattling on about E-gyp-shun spacecraft and such. In the end, though, he will stand by his tribe.

  • Sick of it

    “That’s why schools are essential in countering the kinds of attitudes,
    unfortunate attitudes, children pick up in their living rooms from their
    parents.”

    He just admitted that schools are intended for brainwashing children to make them different from their parents. A rare admission from the left.

  • ncpride

    He could not care less if a single black ‘student’ sees this or not. His little agenda here is exclusively for White children.

  • Nathanwartooth

    “I would say I know many Republicans who aren’t racist, and I wouldn’t want anyone to think that I was equating being a Republican with being a racist. But I know that the criticisms of Obama are definitely rooted in anti-black racism.”

    Oh Republicans aren’t racist, just anything bad said about Obama is racist.

    This guy is off his rocker. Oh and I love how he says he wouldn’t want to live in a post racial society because he could peddle his BS.

    • FransSusan

      You’re so right: he couldn’t peddle his BS in a post racial society. These race hustlers like Gates have nothing of substance, so they keep their gravy train running with their made-up black history BS. The dumb liberals and low I. Q. blacks believe all that crap. He even brought up the mini-series Roots as if it’s actually a true story. How low the US has sunk into third world status when it pays attention to someone as farcical as Gates!

      • Roots was a copyright theft.

        • FransSusan

          I didn’t know that; what do you mean?

          • Katherine McChesney

            Significant parts of it were plaigiarized from a book written by a White man. He sued and won a judgement against Alex Hailey.

          • FransSusan

            Thanks for the info. I didn’t know that. Unfortunately, blacks believe that Alex Hailey is righteous and that the book/movie tells the true story of slavery.

    • Brian

      I heard someone describe it as ‘in afrocentric history, every cowboy’s cook was a hero who personally won the West’.

  • joesolargenius

    I wonder how blacks will react when they find out that the original book of authentic African names was just another made up black scam, please forgive me Lashaunda and LaRaunda and Lakeshisa and Rashesha too.

    • Katherine McChesney

      And Chokwe Lumumba. LaTrina, LaShitta (a name of one of my aunt’s grammar school students.

      • If LaShitta and Shitavious would ever get married?

        • Brian

          …producing La’DubbleFlushavious.

        • joesolargenius

          They would probably name their first child shitoutaluck

    • Brian

      I have always treated -eshia and -avious as gendered suffixes meaning ‘idiot’ in some African tongue. It usually seems to fit.

  • Sue

    Never Forget! (in black)

    • e2657383

      Never Forget…that such discussion about “those people” is not allowed on Amren.

      • Sue

        lol! I’ve had more then one comment removed for my “opinion”. Thank you and if you’ll note there is no J word present.

  • Truthseeker

    Professor Gates talks a good game. While I disagree with a lot of what he has to say, he’s at least good at couching his statements so as not to make any explicitly anti-white agenda obvious. To what degree he believes a lot of his statements that are fair toward whites I’m not sure, but I’m at least glad that he appears somewhat sympathetic to the idea of all races having their own ethnic interests.

    That said, some of this stuff is just ridiculous:

    African-American history would be completely, thoroughly integrated
    into American history. That’s not yet done sufficiently. So that the
    story would be much more complex. We need the story of George
    Washington, but we need the story of his slave at the same time.

    So a visionary leader like George Washington who was part of a successful revolution against the most powerful country in the world at the time is no more important than his slaves? That’s like saying the building janitor is just as important to a large corporation as the CEO.

    So I would like to see a high school class—I wouldn’t do it until then—a
    high school class on African-American history mandated throughout the
    country.

    Hate to break it to you, but we’re so inundated with “black history” that a lot of us are getting tired of it. The fact that never seems to get mentioned is that blacks have accomplished so little of note that having to pretend that black history is some amazing, fascinating journey gets old after a while. The white man’s ideals, culture and vision are what made America into what it is, so the white man’s history tells us a lot more about how our country and culture operate than do the stories of a small minority’s relatively meager achievements. If people want to study black history in depth on their own, that’s fine, but most non-blacks simply can’t relate to it, and have no reason to learn about it.

    I would say I know many Republicans who aren’t racist, and I wouldn’t
    want anyone to think that I was equating being a Republican with being a
    racist. But I know that the criticisms of Obama are definitely rooted
    in anti-black racism.

    Really? This contradicts itself. If you criticize Obama you’re a “racist,” but you can be a Republican and not be a “racist.” In other words, the only way to be a good member of the opposing party is by not criticizing the other side. Admittedly, there are a lot of “Republicans” these days who don’t have the guts to criticize Obama or the left, but surely they must disagree with him on some level, or they’d be Democrats, rights?

    There’s a kind of switch that turns off; the switch is called economic
    fear. The people are threatened, they’re afraid for the future of their
    children. If you’re afraid. If I have I pie, and I have enough to go
    around, Mr. D’Addario, you are welcome to come to dinner. But if I think
    that you eating my pie is going to keep me from eating it, or my
    children, I’m sorry. Not only are you not going to come to dinner, but I
    also might be talking bad about Italians.

    The problem is, there often isn’t enough to go around. He makes the fear sound irrational, but it’s not. We may live in a civilized era, but the fight for survival still exists among all races. We can’t have the diverse society he envisions without various interests encroaching on others. It’s not simply a matter of who has what, but where they have it.

    That’s why schools are essential in countering the kinds of attitudes,
    unfortunate attitudes, children pick up in their living rooms from their
    parents.

    What a chilling statement. He openly declares his preference for institutions to displace the family. It’s hard to trust anyone who thinks like that.

    • Reverend Bacon

      You make some good points, but you missed his racist dog whistle on the “unity” thing. ” When it comes to voting in a black president, it was overwhelming, 95 percent unity. ” He cheers the fact that all the blacks voted for BHO simply because he’s black. Add that to your point about his “all criticism of BHO is racist” and you’ve really said all I need to hear about this menace.

      • Brian

        95% of blacks voted for BO, but 90% of them voted for Kerry as well. They will vote black if they can, but failing that, they will happily vote for the melanin-deprived gibsmedat dispenser.

        • Reverend Bacon

          Yes, and again they do it approximately in unity. If even 80% of whites voted for a particular candidate, we’d never hear the end of how racist this country is.

          • Brian

            I’m willing to risk it. 😉

          • Reverend Bacon

            I laughed out loud.

    • Tim_in_Indiana

      If you read what he says carefully, everything he says, while couched in terms aimed at making it appear he wants to be fair to whites, is really about elevating blacks at the expense of whites.

      Everything.

      • Brian

        Exactly. In a black-run society, it would be all black, all the time. There would be no holiday for Washington or Columbus, no celebration or acknowledgement of Italian heritage…just a monobloc assault on YT. Little does he realize that his true problem is the Amigos, not whites. Latinos and blacks are going to be fighting over the same slice of pie, with ever-increasing numbers (and somewhat higher IQ), and they have no white guilt either. The good professor will be begging YT to step in and help in decades to come.

  • e2657383

    I think Jared Taylor said that 50% of current African Americans have no history of slavery in the USA, since they are recent immigrants or the descendants of recent immigrants, or otherwise just had no history of it.

    So why is Gates still speaking as if every Black person has the same history? Also, why is he staying in the USA surrounded by Whites if we are so evil?

    • FransSusan

      Because he gets rich off his lies and half-truths. He’s nothing but a buffoon and a race ho! He has to keep this farcical black history mythology going to remain relevant!

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    Gates?

    I won’t watch anything this egotistical, anti-White, over-inflated, black elitist jerk is in or listen to anything he has to say to Whites about race.

    • Sentinel9

      “27 million black are still owned as slaves today in Muslim countries” and an intercepted Nigerian diplomatic document proves Iran is secretly trying to acquire some.

    • e2657383

      I prefer the term libtard.

    • Brian

      So blacks are better at something than whites! They should put this factoid in Black History Month, for sure.

  • FransSusan

    I recently received in the mail a request for money from my alma mater. Like most colleges and universities these days it has a black history studies curriculum with its well paid professors and deans etc. I sent the money request back to the university in their pre-paid envelope, and told ‘them’ that I’d never contribute until they got rid of the black studies dean, curriculum, professors, etc., and stopped all the political correctness and affirmative action programs and practices at the university. Yea, I guess it was a passive aggressive, useless tactic, but I needed to do it.

    • Brian

      Didn’t cost you anything but a few minutes of time, and it sends a message. Plus they have to figure that for every response like this they get, there are more who feel the same way.

      • FransSusan

        Thank you for your response. I wish others would do it. That’s the only way to wake up these idiot universities–deny money. Although no doubt they get a lot of Federal govt. grants to run those programs, too.

        • Brian

          My university recently changed its admission formula to more heavily weight high school GPA, and decrease the weight of SAT scores, to ‘remove impediments to minority admission’ and ‘reduce gender inequity’. They called asking for money and I told them no, because of this.

  • IKantunderstand

    Henry Louis Gates is like 80 percent White. (Or something, I saw it on a show that I confess, I really don’t remember that well). I’m sorry, I have to agree with Mr. Gates that everything has been about race. However, it’s not just race. It is I.Q. Sorry, Henry, your Negro relatives are completely stupid. They have always been stupid. Dr. Gates, you are smart as you are because of your White D.N.A. In fact, I know you know that for a fact. Unfortunately for you, your brain is White, but your physical appearance still registers as Black. I will bet that had your physical appearance been White, you would have passed as such. You are a phony.You are pissed that you are smart as hell, but still marginalized as an Affirmative Action denizen. Sorry Dr. Gates, but there is no thinking person alive in the U.S. that thinks ANY Black person got where they did based on merit. Every single Black person in the United Stares of America is under suspicion as being fundamentally incompetent, and only got their job because of AA. So, do you Blacks even care? I’ll bet not. You Blacks are a joke. You demand the world. You demand promotions. You demand getting a job in the first place. So pathetic. You are so worthless. You can’t do anything right, unless oversee’d. You don’t do any more than you have to, you are in fact, the absolute worst employees ever on the face of the earth. But in terms of duping Whites? You are par excellence. I hope to drink to the end of your reign. (You know, when Whites come to their senses).

    • Bossman

      He couldn’t be 80% white and look so black. He’s maybe 10% white. He is very boring but he does have something to say.

  • WR_the_realist

    Somehow I suspect that the chief problem black people have in this country is not that they aren’t being taught enough black history. I doubt very much that more black history will improve black math scores, reduce the 70% black illegitimacy rate, or reduce black crime.

    Lord knows, white kids aren’t being taught any white history these days, except for lurid tales about how wicked the ancestors were.

  • e2657383

    We must not mention The Chosen on this website.

  • Alexandra1973

    Waitaminnit–Isn’t this Mr. BS (Beer Summit)?

  • Stephen Manning

    12% of the population wants to be treated as 50% of the population. Zzzzzzz.

  • texasoysterman

    Thanks for that reference, Brian. I just spent an hour on Wiki wading through countless “See also” related articles. Enjoyable and edifying.

  • stewball

    I’m not going to address this yet as I don’t know anything about it. I want to read about it first but I’m sure my dad, not a violent man, would have joined in doing the right thing. I also believe rapists and pedophiles should get the death penalty. These people do not have any right to life.

  • stewball

    That’s what I want to read before talking with you about it. Ok?