14 More Correctional Officers Indicted in Connection With BGF Case

CBS Baltimore, November 21, 2013

Federal investigators believe more than half of the corrections officers at the Baltimore City jail helped inmates smuggle in contraband. A new set of officers has just been indicted.

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The total number currently stands at 44 Black Guerrilla Family gang members and their associates indicted on federal charges; 27 of those are correctional officers at the Baltimore City Detention Center.

The affidavit reads like a box office film: correctional officers smuggling drugs in their private parts, some of them prostituting themselves out to inmates and members of the Black Guerrilla Family charging non-BGF gang members rent to live in the jail and even watch TV.

The investigation into the Baltimore City Detention Center led to the indictment of 19 additional people, 14 of them correctional officers.

The jailhouse saga started back in April when 13 guards and several inmates were indicted on federal racketeering and conspiracy charges.

Tavon White, a former inmate and named leader of the BGF gang, pleaded guilty to using correctional guards to help run his lucrative drug operations while behind bars.

The affidavit shows the feds are now getting a clearer picture of the illegal happenings in jail with 14 anonymous cooperators, who witnessed the intimidation and criminal activity first-hand.

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A former correctional officer says 50 percent or more of the officers smuggled contraband into BCDC, some concealing the drugs and cell phones in food in their clothing.

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A corrupt officer now off the job told investigators he or she made $10,000-$15,0000 a week from pushing contraband.

According to another cooperator listed in the affidavit, 95 percent of all the working men are BGF gang members.

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Of the latest correctional officers indicted Thursday, two of them are supervisors.

If convicted, the correctional officers face up to 20 years in federal prison.

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