Obama’s Inauguration Reverend: All Whites Are Going to Hell

Neil Munro, Daily Caller, October 31, 2012

All white people are going to hell, longtime African-American civil rights advocate Rev. Joseph Lowery told an audience at a get-out-the-vote event held Oct. 27 in Georgia.

Lowery, who gave the benediction at the January 2009 inauguration of President Barack Obama, told the audience of up to 300 African-Americans “that when he was a young militant, he used to say all white folks were going to hell. Then he mellowed and just said most of them were. Now, he said, he is back to where he was,” according to an Oct. 31 report in the Monroe County Reporter newspaper.

“I don’t know what kind of a n——wouldn’t vote with a black man running,” Lowery also told the audience in the St. James Baptist Church in Forsyth, Ga., according to the Reporter.

“He was saying [that] based on all of the hatred that’s going on” towards President Barack Obama, Helen Butler, the executive director of Lowery’s Georgia-based Coalition for the People’s Agenda, told The Daily Caller.

“He just fell that he should feel the way he used to feel,” Butler, who attended the rally, explained.

“Of course he doesn’t believe that all whites should go to hell,” she added.

“That’s not him—he’s a very caring person.”

“He was trying to get people motivated to ensure they go and vote…. [and] he did make the point that there is a lot of hatred in this country,” she said.

“It was a joke” told via the perspective of a young militant, Lowery told TheDC. “When I said it, I said it was a joke, I identified it as a joke,” he said.

However, the article also quotes Forsyth Mayor John Howard saying he was “pretty shocked” by Lowery’s comments.

{snip}

When asked by TheDC about the other notable comment—“what kind of a n—- wouldn’t vote with a black man running”—Lowery said he did not remember making that statement.

“I never said that, I don’t remember saying that,” he told TheDC.

Lowery’s n-word comment was not a discriminatory comment or an appeal to racial solidarity, Butler told TheDC. “He’s not saying you should support the black guy because of his race, he’s saying you should support a competent black person,” she said. “If all else is equal, why not vote for your race?”

When asked why polls show up to 95 percent support for Obama among African-Americans despite their tough economic circumstances over the last 10 years, Lowery said, “I’d like to see it 99” percent.

{snip}

Lowery is major figure in Democratic politics. He was born in 1921 and is called a “civil rights icon” because he co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with Rev. Martin Luther King and ran it for 20 years, from 1977 to 1997.

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