America’s Money-Grubbing, Racial Extortionists

Mychal Massie, WorldNetDaily, June 30, 2009

Tell me how an apology for slavery and Jim Crow makes blacks any better off. The answer, of course, is that it doesn’t. But to that point, it never was about apologies was it? It has always been about reparations.

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., head of the Congressional Black Caucus said, “I would not want to have any language in place that would deny anyone, any citizen, the right to address a grievance.” For those not familiar with legalese–“right to address a grievance” is a benign way of saying, “right to sue for megabucks based on a real or perceived wrong.”

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., said, “I feel that some method other than just an apology should be made–people should be whole.” Once again, for those not familiar with the language, “should be made whole,” simplistically put, means “should get a ton of money to repair a complaint.”

And that is exactly what has these elapidal, greedy, money-grubbing, racial extortionists so exercised. They want money, and the apology is simply the viscous lubricant that greases the machinations of their intent. Even more egregious is the fact that most of the black citizenry, being overcome with their own dreams of what reparation dollars will buy–are too blind and/or jaundiced to understand that they are the useful idiots in a much larger and more complex shell-game.

First of all, America has apologized–often and repeatedly. America apologized when over 700,000 men, women and children died fighting a war that ultimately led to the end of slavery. America apologized by being a country with the good sense and decency to abolish slavery and Jim Crow. America apologized with equal rights, civil rights, Great Society initiatives, race-based affirmative action programs, Act 101, race-based contracts and set-asides, race-based business loans and mortgages, the permitting of segregated dormitories, graduations and proms to placate race mongers, color-coded jobs, and the list goes on and on. But the cry is for more–and those who profit from white guilt, coupled with corrupt opportunity, are working diligently to extort trillions of dollars based on a debt that has already been paid.

The Congressional Black Caucus is upset because contained in the Senate version of the apology resolution is a disclaimer that reads in part, “Nothing in this resolution authorizes or supports any claim against the United States.” In common parlance that means, “You get a written apology, but not one penny in addition to same.”

{snip} [Senator Thompson] further indicated that it was the intentions of CBC members to vote against the apology specifically because they couldn’t cash in on it.

{snip} The people clamoring for an apology are not interested in an “I’m sorry” unless it is accompanied by trillions of reparation dollars. {snip}

NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous, in a prepared statement, said, “The apology for slavery and the era of Jim Crow is long overdue and is the first step toward healing the wounds of African-American men and women throughout this country.” Note the language, “first step toward healing.” Anyone care to bet on what the second step is?

The wounds of Jim Crow and slavery have been healed for black families–but these entrepreneurs of racial discord and immiseration don’t want that to be understood–because there is no financial quid-pro-quo in that scenario for them.

{snip}

Tell me how “all races, ethnicity and national origins” are going to benefit from this shakedown. You may not agree with me, and I’m sure many do not, but no apology and certainly no reparations are going to make a bit of difference in the lives of those they are supposedly for. {snip}

[Editor’s Note: A news story concerning the Senate’s apology, along with the full text of the resolution, can be read here.]

massie

Mychal Massie.

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