One in ten children under the age of four is now Muslim in England and Wales, the latest statistics show.

In the under-fives age group there are nearly twice as many people identified as Muslim as in the general population, census data reveals.

The figures suggest a change in the UK’s younger generation of worshippers as less than 0.5 per cent of over 85s in Britain identify as Muslim.

One expert said the number of practising Muslims could soon outnumber the number of Christians who actively worship in the UK. David Voas, Professor of Population Studies at the University of Essex, told The Times: ‘It’s not inconceivable.’

An Office for National Statistics breakdown of Britain’s religions and age groups shows in 2011 there were 3.5 million children aged 0-4, of whom 320,000 were Muslim.

That proportion is more than 9 per cent and compares with a total Muslim population among all age groups of less than 5 per cent.

There were 1.6 million Muslims in England and Wales in 2001, or 3 per cent of the population, according to the census. By 2011 the Muslim population had grown to 2.7 million people or 4.8 per cent of the population.

‘It certainly is a startling figure,’ said David Coleman, Professor of Demography at the University of Oxford. ‘We have had substantial immigration of Muslims for a long time.

‘Continuing immigration from Pakistan, Bangladesh and India has been added to by new immigration from African countries and from the Middle East. Birth rates of Muslims of Pakistani and Bangladeshi origin remain quite high, although falling. There seem to be very low levels of falling away from religion among Muslims.’

The largest religious group, at 1.5 million, among those aged 0-4 is still comprised of Christians, 43 per cent.

Dale Barton, priest in charge at St Clement’s, a Church of England parish in Bradford, said: ‘This was a white working-class British area 50 years ago. They have all gone. There are two pubs hanging on by their fingertips. There’s a Labour club. One club has just gone. Shops are now Muslim-owned. I’m not decrying that. A significant number open on Christmas Day.’

There are now 136 Muslim schools, 125 of them in the private sector, according to the Department for Education. Britain has a total of 1,600 mosques and the first UK halal food festival was held in September.

Ibrahim Mogra, assistant secretary-general of the Muslim Council of Britain, said that the large number of young Muslim children reflected the confidence that Muslims had in the country, encouraging them to bring up families here. ‘I just wouldn’t want our fellow citizens to be alarmed by an increase in number,’ he said.

‘This generation is very much British. They feel very much this is their home. It’s not about Britain becoming a Muslim country but about Britain enabling the practice of Islam, which gives confidence to the vast majority of Muslims. It’s a great country to regard as our home.’

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  • D.B. Cooper

    I can already see the headline in 5 -10 years: “Half of all babies in England are Muslim”.
    Your countryman, H.G. Wells predicted you will become a castrated serf, while the movie version has you wearing pink like a little sissy, while a Morlock takes away your woman.
    Is that you, Englishman? I think it is until you prove me wrong.

    • Steven Barr

      Why are you so smug? The UK is 87 percent white. We’re in a much better situation then you are.
      I can’t imagine any politician here would be brave enough to force schools to discipline an equal number of pupils according to race although no doubt they secretly want to.

      • D.B. Cooper

        No, you are not in a better situation. We Americans still have places to flee to until it’s time to fight. Where are you going to run to? The Celtic Sea? Bay of Biscay? The North Sea? I’ll bet one of your many Mohammeds can take a leak on Big Ben and Stonehenge, and you’ll blame yourself for not accommodating enough.

        Remember this guy, Michael Adebolajo? Remember what he did? No, of course you don’t. He actually left the country, and you took him back.

        • Steven Barr

          Time to fight? How are you going to do that? Oh I forgot, as you keep reminding us it is legal in the US to own firearms. Which of course is going to be of great use against the federal government’s helicopter gunships.

          • D.B. Cooper

            We’ll fight at the usual time, as in when we have to bail England out of another mess…again.

          • David Ashton

            England doesn’t need your ignorant sneers or your imaginary “help”, or you.

          • Extropico

            Your smug tone when preaching to the choir is unhelpful. Texan open border “conservatives” are a danger to the rest of the nation. Our worst presidents have been Texans. Look at home before you sneer elsewhere please.

          • ncpride

            Both our countries are in dire straits, and we have all been betrayed by our governments. Our countries, culture and our way of life is being stripped from us despite our objections. There will come a time when we will all have to fight or die. It’s that simple. We should unite and help each other as much as possible. I actually believe a Revolution will start somewhere in Europe and spread from there. Fear of our traitorous governments should be the last thing on our minds. We outnumber them considerably, and I like to think many of them would have severe reservations about turning on their own people. That’s my hope anyway. Call me naïve, but I still have faith in our people.

          • So CAL Snowman

            Gunships can’t fly without pilots, at least no yet . . .

        • anew

          Come on, they’ve got big problems, but they’re obviously in a much better demographic and political situation than us—their country is much whiter and the population is much more intensely opposed to immigration. They need some foresight though.

          If the rest of Britain expels/declares its independence from The London metro area, expels the illegals, and encourages white immigration, the country could be 96-97% white within a decade. The English countryside is still 99% white.

          • D.B. Cooper

            RUN?!?!?! From the capital?? If there is ANY place on that overcrowded isle that should be protected to the last man, it would be London itself. If running to the rapidly fading countryside is your solution, then you have already lost. Just wait for the bell to ring when it’s Morlock dinnertime. Perhaps a time traveler can be your savior.

          • IstvanIN

            Maybe London should be surrounded, fenced off and cleansed. There are still many competent and brave British soldiers, even William and Harry, despite a life of “privilege”, seem up to the task.

        • Kronolog

          How is it advantageous to be able to flee? Once you cannot flee any more, you have to choose either to fight or to submit. I’d say the sooner we are forced to make this decision, the better.

        • Mahound

          We’re all in this together.

          • Max Krakah

            yes, it’s silly to fight over who is in it deeper

      • You say the UK is 87% but for how long at that birth rate plus new immigration? What about England proper? It’s my understanding that 25% of your population is Middle Eastern born.

  • Oil Can Harry

    British nurses had been wondering why so so many newborns were hiding explosives in their diapers.

    • LeGrandDerangement

      And wearing diapers on their heads.

  • Matthew Taylor

    Are there any ‘actively worshiping christians’ left in England?

    • jeffaral

      There are millions of them! They came from the Caribbean, subsaharian Africa, Latin America, even from the Phillippines.

    • LeGrandDerangement

      C. S. Lewis wrote “Mere Christianity” in, I think, 1948. He bluntly stated in that book that England was not a Christian country. I was surprised to see that.

      • Whiteplight sees the Emperor N

        CS Lewis was a great friend of JRR Tolkien. CS Lewis had been an “atheist” (unbeliever) until a point in his life when Tolkien’s influence on him as a devout Catholic finally caused Lewis to convert to Catholicism. Many Catholics don’t recognize Protestants as Christians and visa, versa. So you may be making an assumption that isn’t really there. Anyway, IMHO, it is best for Europeans and whites everywhere to rid themselves of these sick, Middle Eastern religions and make their blood and ancestors and indigenous lands their religion. That, and nothing else is the only spirituality that has anything positive or useful to offer whites.

  • Homo_Occidentalis

    Queen Boudica, William the Conqueror, Henry V, William Shakespeare, Horatio Nelson, Queen Victoria, the Duke of Wellington, Winston Churchill, George Orwell and Enoch Powell are all writhing in the earth. Europe is dying, and the Muslims will grow more strident in their demands as they catch the scent of death. Just as the refined Romans fell to the more robust races of the north, the effeminate English will fall before the terrors of Islam. I do believe we will see an English Caliphate in my lifetime.

    • David Ashton

      Thanks for the warning, but I think we shall prove you wrong.

      • Homo_Occidentalis

        You’ll have to pardon my fatalism, but as a Canadian I perceive only three certainties in life: death, taxes, and continued massive non-white immigration. Though immigration in per capita terms is worse here, the Mohammedans do not form as much of a distinct and important underclass here as they do in old Albion. Their influence is more dilute among the sea of other undesirables arriving in the hundreds of thousands every year. Leftism is far too entrenched among the white youth, and contempt for “racialists” ubiquitous. Very little can be done now to prevent a complete racial and cultural replacement of the British peoples.

        • So CAL Snowman

          I feel bad for you guys, you have an african on your Olympic National hockey team. Even Team USA is free and clear of them.

        • David Ashton

          Little is better than nothing done to prevent the “complete racial and cultural replacement of the Briitish peoples in north America, Australia, New Zealand and the British Isles”. AmREN is here to help.

          The leftism among white youth is a product of indoctrination and entertainment, plus the fake multicultural policy at official level.
          The Canadian situation is bad, but “you know too well the forces that compose their army to dread their superior numbers” (General Wolfe).

    • Matthew Taylor

      English Caliphate? St. George pray for us!

      • David Ashton

        I am writing a memorandum at this very moment to discourage the Royal Society of St George, “the premier patriotic society of England”, from the fatal absurdity of redefining itself as a “multicultural” organisation.

    • D.B. Cooper

      While you are listing “better Brits” from history, how about naming some who were known to dislike Muslims, blacks, and other foreigners: Elizabeth I and Richard the Lionheart come to immediate mind.

      • Anglokraut

        Tolkien didn’t seem to care for them, either.

        • NeanderthalDNA

          Orcs.

          • Anglokraut

            Yeah, some of the symbolism isn’t all that subtle in LotR.

          • NeanderthalDNA

            You know I’m surprised old Peter Jackson hasn’t inserted a negro into “his” franchise.
            He did manage to throw in a hot elven butt kicking chick in the Hobbit, I hear. Very video gamey!
            I actually didn’t mind his LoTR movies. He wanted to “go there” back then, but according to the commentary apparently Liv Tyler took the time to read the trilogy and when Jackson and Philippa Bowens wanted her to do a hot butt kicking elf chick scene she pretty much refused, pointing out how inappropriate it would have been.
            Which put Ms. Tyler on my grade A list of actors/actresses of course. Her physical beauty doesn’t hurt, but her mind is the clincher.

          • Homo_Occidentalis

            Unfortunately, that is not true at all. After a long (and I believe unintentional) aversion to diversity in his films, Peter Jackson has at last bowed to the overwhelming Marxist pressures and has snuck some “orcs” to his latest work. It’s only for a split second, in a real case of “blink and you’ll miss it”, but there were in fact non-whites in The Desolation of Smaug.
            Can you imagine that? Somalis in Laketown! It completely took me out of the film and had me steaming mad the rest of the evening. The image at the bottom was not pulled from a NatGeo article, but is a screenshot from the film showing a few of the bedraggled Somali aliens Mr. Jackson saw fit to exhibit.

          • NeanderthalDNA

            I apologize for voting you thumbs down. It’s nothing personal and that was a great old post.

            It’s just that image can inspire nothing positive in me whatsoever.
            Besides, thumbs downs count equally on the post to response ratio with thumbs up, so…

            “Oh my gosh – there’s an orc!”

          • Homo_Occidentalis

            Thumbs up are overrated. I was just glad to keep you informed of Jackson’s conversion to the dark side.

          • David Ashton

            Not like the savages in “King Kong”. Why won’t they give Naomi Watts an Oscar?

          • Anglokraut

            I didn’t think the remake was all that good, so I hope that had something to do with it.

          • David Ashton

            Don’t get me to stray on the subject of Naomi Watts, a brilliant, beautiful, versatile and ESPECIALLY hardworking actress, unfortunately “English”, whose fortunes have not been helped by the Diana film or rescued by her partnership with Tinsel Town’s Liev Schreiber. Her “notorious” mother Miv owns an interior design business not far away from my own home in Norfolk……

            What’s this got to do with AmRen, you may well ask? (I expect Stewball will find “antisemitism” in there somewhere.)

          • shmo123

            I don’t know much about her, except that she’s beautiful and talented. I thought she was Australian?

          • David Ashton

            Born in Shoreham Kent and went to Australia when she was 14, returning for visits here. The sunset on her nose in the King Kong aircraft scene did not do her face justice but I found her pretty irresistible in the early restaurant encounter with Jack Black. She invented some of the Kong screenplay and actually co-produced “Painted Veil”. She is grossly underrated in the USA.

          • LeGrandDerangement

            After some of the stirring speeches in LoTR, this is disgusting!

      • IstvanIN

        King Edward I.

        • LeGrandDerangement

          And across the Channel, Charles Martel, sadly missed today.

      • David Ashton

        Not a matter of hating them so much as loving our own way of life. The real enemies here have been the “Cultural Marxists”, although the immigrants contain an undue proportion of criminals, spongers and fanatics.

        20th century Brits could be added to your list; e.g. Philip Larkin: Prison for strikers/ Bring back the cat/ Kick out the [persons of colour]/How about that?”.

        • LeGrandDerangement

          Larkin and Kingsley Amis were two of the best.

      • skara_brae

        The Droogs.

      • David Ashton

        Churchill too, but complained that his Cabinet would not follow him on this.

  • dd121

    I wonder how long it will take for the guest population to demand conversion to Islam or death?

    • David Ashton

      Download “The Islamisation of the West” (Barnabas Aid, July/August 2010) pdf.

  • King of My Castle

    White people aren’t having enough babies, and they aren’t going to church like they should, either.

    • Anglokraut

      I agree with your first point, but I say that Christianity is on its way out. I’m fine with this, as I believe that all people have to grow up and put their imaginary friends with the other relics of immaturity. Unfortunately, Islam culture was deliberately stunted centuries ago, and Muslims with access to the internet are only just starting to realize how backward they are.

      • Matthew Taylor

        Atheism is a fad, it will go away soon.

        • silviosilver

          Atheism as a way of life is rather faddish, but some form of explicit atheism is always going to be around. Atheists do very good work at curtailing the severest forms of religious irrationality and craziness and for that I praise them. But they go too far when they attempt to strip people of any kind of spiritual connection whatsoever.

          With regard to race, atheists are prime targets for conversion. Every device use to assail religion can be used to assail their views on race and racial policy (easily over 90% of atheists I’ve encountered are some form of leftist equalitarian, and not uncommonly stridently anti-white).

          • Anglokraut

            You’re not wrong about how many atheists are anti-White, but I think that comes from a lot of them not being challenged by other atheists who are conservative on issues of race (which really, is every issue out there). Perhaps this is a failing of the conservative atheist community to be more aggressive in challenging leftist B.S.. At the moment, the conservative atheist group on Facebook is still just batting around Ayn Rand, and how seriously she ought to be taken–which isn’t my area of interest.

          • the sound the flood the hour

            I think it has more to do with the fact that atheism was propagated by marxists intellectuals as one method of destroying the west. At one point or another, atheism has always been intertwined with feminism, darwinism, social justice, statism ect,. There has always been an underlying anti-white/anti-western tone to the atheist propaganda. Isn’t that the recruiting tool of the modern atheist? To constantly demonize Christianity and the west in order to promote atheism?

          • David Ashton

            Sometimes people now outside the Christian orbit like myself can see more clearly than naive and good-natured Christians the “conspiratorial” nature of the offensive against western tradition from the New Left. There have been good atheits on our side, like Antony Flew.

            Worth noting is Philip E. Devine’s “Human Diversity and the Culture Wars” Praeger 1996).

          • silviosilver

            I think Antony Flew was even an Amren reader. I could swear I remember a letter to the editor from him in the early days of the publication. It’d have to be somewhere in the archives. I’ll search for it when I find the time.

          • David Ashton

            I can believe it. He had a brilliant mind even as a college undergraduate (I have his student’s copy of Hume’s “Treatise on Human Nature” with incisive annotations), and was a true gentleman. He really is missed.

          • silviosilver

            Found it, Jan. 1999 issue (not quite the ‘early days’ as I thought). The letter I remember made a different point, though, so either my memory’s faulty or he wrote in more than once.

          • the sound the flood the hour

            So? I must be one of those christians you speak of and yet despite being “naive”, every time I argue with an atheist, I notice that their entire premise is based on anti-western propaganda. They fashion themselves as “geniuses” and yet they don’t even know the difference between adaptation and speciation. I still think atheist propaganda has done far more harm to the west than whatever “greater good” might have came out of it.

          • David Ashton

            Your US experience differs from my UK one. But I do not consider you “naive” at all, exactly the opposite from what you write.

          • Brian

            You can argue with me about religion if you want; I guarantee there won’t be any anti-western propaganda from my corner. I agree that atheists, by and large, have often had this motivation though, unfortunately.

          • silviosilver

            I’m familiar with the ‘objectivist’ movement atheists. I’m not so sure I’d call them conservative on racial issues, except in the case that we’re talking about a mere reluctance to immediately lay the blame on whites in any racial incident or to explain the failings of blacks and other non-whites in terms of white racism. That’s something, I guess. But unless hereditary racial differences are cited then explanations inevitably come back to some form of environmental excuse that damns whites. So the same approach as I recommend be taken to leftist atheists needs to be taken with objectivists, which is to invite them to apply the same logical thought processes to race as they do to religion.

            Of course, one needn’t be an atheist to make that invitation. Any religious believer could say to an atheist, “You accuse me of believing in God, ultimately, for no other reason than that it’s comforting. But look at yourself. Whatever reason you have for believing in human equality (or racial equality) it’s emphatically not because scientific investigation demonstrates any such thing.” This may strike a religious man as conceding defeat to atheists, but belief in God can survive merely on faith; belief in human equality cannot.

          • David Ashton

            Rand was good, but her “successors” are largely Jews without the Judaism. I think both religious and atheist thinkers can be race realists and patriots, especially vis-a-vis Islamic threat.

          • LeGrandDerangement

            Paul Ryan is a big fan of Rand…tells me what I need to know about her.

          • Brian

            I consider myself a ‘Christian atheist’, i.e. irreligious but culturally Christian. I limit my ire to those who want to force their beliefs on me, or as you say, ‘the severest forms of religious irrationality and craziness’– like the parents who refuse to take their kids to the hospital when they have a treatable illness, praying for a miracle and the kid dies needlessly. I have no problem with ‘in God we trust’ and always say Merry Christmas, etc. White Christians are my natural allies, because Christianity has been a foundational cornerstone of Western Civ for 2k years. I like visiting old churches and cathedrals, and all the Christian-themed music, art, literature, etc. It feels like ‘home’ to me even though I don’t go to church anymore.

            Most atheists are multi-cult libs, that’s true. Even if I agree with them more or less on religion, their other stances often repulse me. But for me, and others here, my drive to discard what I perceive as pleasant fictions in favor of the hard truth is the same mentality that took me to my current racial/political stance. Perhaps someday we can have friendly arguments about theology again, but now is the time for all race-realist whites to circle the wagons and unite. We must hang together or we will surely hang separately…

          • silviosilver

            I call myself a Christian atheist too. (When did you first use the term? I’ll race ya.) Part of the reason is that it’s the culture I was raised in and which feels familiar, and the fondness with which I look back at the many good times I had, in church, or singing carols, putting up Christmas trees, feeling ‘blessed’ and so on. Another part of the reason, though, is that, after having investigated the other big religions, is that the most basic Christian concepts like redemption, salvation, atonement are more helpful to me in establishing a meaning for my existence than the doctrines of other faiths. And I guess a third reason is that it helps solidify a Western Civilization identity, to really feel a part of the whole thing and to strengthen my resolve to fight the pricks who want to wreck it.

            On the other hand, if it’s help with psychological problems (feeling excessively anxious, depressed, angry, frustrated etc), which is a huge reason why many people turn to religion, then I think Buddhism beats the pants off Christianity. Indeed, Christianity, can be quite awful psychologically, with its emphasis on guilt and its threats of eternal damnation. But I don’t need religion to help me with these issues. Modern self-psychology (increasingly calling itself “positive psychology”) in turn beats the pants off Buddhism when it comes to feeling good and empowered. A lot of this material is corrupted by the get-rich-quick seminars, and it has a horrible tendency to over-promise and under-deliver, but the core of it has worked wonders for me.

          • Brian

            I don’t know how long I’ve been using the term Christian Atheist, but it’s useful in distinguishing myself from the irritating folks who are reflexively anti-theist. Some atheists actually seem to think that if they get in people’s faces enough, they can de-convert the whole world and have a religion-free society and everything will be peachy. I don’t buy it. The religious impulse is baked into human nature, not as a single, purpose-made circuit, but as a side effect amalgam of evolution-driven survival mechanisms… small children reflexively see agency everywhere (asking ‘why’ and ‘who’ questions instead of ‘how’ and ‘what’), and we have a tendency to err on the side of sensing patterns that don’t exist, so as not to miss the ones that do exist. Because of our limited senses, memory, and processing (and lack of telepathy) we’re the center of our own universe and want to bargain with the universe for help and immortality. So 95% of humans, at all times and places, are religious, and I can’t see that going away. The best we can do is winnow the destructive elements away from the impulse…witch burnings and such.

            We have Islam for instance, a religion tied to a basket of quasi-imperial motives, a drive for universality and domination. Well, to me, Christianity is a counterweight to that, a way for the West to stand up for itself under another banner, and resist this other force, and instead, remake the world more to our liking. So that’s where I pitch my tent. If we’re going to have the church, temple, or mosque, I’ll gladly take the church.

        • Anglokraut

          If logic and reason are fads, then call me a hipster.

          • Sick of it

            Your logic is more sound than Aristotle?

          • Anglokraut

            What does Aristotle have to do with what Christians believe? His interest was in what we could learn from what we observe. Mankind has no gods to observe–no preserve on Olympus or Valhalla, or the Elysium Fields on which to give divinity the Jane Goodall Experience.

          • Sick of it

            Try reading Metaphysics and De Anima if you’re really interested.

        • Bossman

          What will replace it? More superstition? More mythology?

      • King of My Castle

        Christianity is on its way out? Derp.

      • the sound the flood the hour

        Christianity is far more rooted in reason and common sense than the current dogma of today.

        • jeffaral

          Christianity and Islam came from the desert.

          • captainc

            true that

          • Zaporizhian Sich

            It is Islam however that has made a desert out of whites homelands, and sooner or later unless stopped many white nations may become radioactive deserts.

        • King of My Castle

          Yes. Christian belief can withstand the most rigorous intellectual pulling-apart.

        • White Light

          Low bar

      • Max Krakah

        Well the atheists seem to believe more in magic and nonsense than Christians do. There is a whole laundry list of their fetishistic beliefs, from global warming to vegetarianism to people that think animals are human to people that think plants feel and communicate with each other to sweat lodge cults. In the end it always seems to come back to atheists find some object to use to worship themselves. Global warming-humans are so powerful that they can change climate and the anti-global warmists are the PURE ones that will put a stop to it. To sweat lodge nuts- self worship, to vegetarians-self worship. What really bothers atheists about theists is the idea that they are not the be all and end all of existence.

        • Anglokraut

          I love meat, and my boyfriend who works for big oil. I don’t give any thought to an invisible force of both benevolent and malevolent intent. It’s not that I’m ignoring anything–I was not raised to believe in any supernatural being. For me, the thought of giving credit for something, to a god that I know I had to invent in my own head–is ludicrous.

          • King of My Castle

            What if you didn’t invent Him on your own head, though? What if He broke through to you, despite your best efforts to disbelieve in Him?

          • shmo123

            What’s ludicrous is how anyone can be so blind and soulless.

          • Anglokraut

            Wow, feeling a bit sanctimonious today, shmo123?

          • shmo123

            Perhaps. Your beliefs are what they are, and my remark was unwarranted. I guess I have trouble understanding how any sentient, intelligent person can be an atheist.

          • Anglokraut

            It’s alright, I feel the same way sometimes when I talk to the religious. We all have to make an effort to see the other side, but we don’t have to adopt the opinion. No hard feelings.

          • shmo123

            From one civilized person to another, thank you for your gracious response.

          • Brian

            Over the past 10,000 years of civilization, humans have worshipped something like 2,500 deities, almost all of whom are defunct. The gods of the Greeks, Aztecs, Egyptians, Babylonians– who tends their altars now? Despite those people’s accomplishments, their fervent religious beliefs were nonsense. Zeus, Quetzlcoatl, Osiris, and Marduk never existed. This realization alone should inspire some humility in those who have certainty in their ‘one true faith’– which they often hold only because of accidents of parentage and geography. Humanity’s batting average in divining religious truth is far below the Mendoza line.

            My attitude toward deities is the same as how I feel about leprechauns– of course there could be one somewhere, but I’m going to need some kind of evidence. Otherwise, my default position is one of unbelief in the idea.

          • shmo123

            Without trying to change your mind Brian, or get into any serious theological debate, perhaps those ancients worshiped their Gods because of some innate yearning to find and understand the one true God and creator. Maybe. But since the almighty isn’t likely to come to earth and prove his existence to any of us, maybe it’s possible to see touches of the divine in a poem, painting, a stirring symphony, a beautiful sculpture, or the laughter of a child. If you’ve ever loved someone, you can’t measure those feelings, or see them, but you certainly know that they’re there and how very powerful they can be. You’re no different than a lot of people though, because faith may be the most difficult thing for anyone to hold and keep. Ultimately, it may come down to what Aquinas said: “To those who have faith, no explanation is necessary; to those that don’t, no explanation is possible.”
            Peace.

          • Brian

            Great response. Thanks for that. I certainly don’t denigrate anyone’s spiritual yearnings, or recognition of these ‘touches of the divine’. I hear it in Beethoven, see it in the ‘golden ratio/fibonacci’ patterns in a sunflower, and marvel at the cycle of birth and death, just like everyone. Where I get off the train is when someone claims 100% certainty that their way is THE WAY, with an implied threat beneath the declaration.

          • Sick of it

            Jesus was very clear when he stated “I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.” (John 14:6).

            “But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.” (Revelation 21:8).

            It’s not like we say these things to be jerks, but to warn people of what awaits them if they do not seek God through His son Jesus Christ. We’d never say a word if we didn’t care.

          • Brian

            I don’t doubt your concern or sincerity. But you realize the gospel of John was written around 90AD, right? By someone whose identity we don’t actually know, and someone who was not an eyewitness. And they didn’t have audio or video recording devices back then, or stenographers among the disciples… 60 years after Jesus’ death, I’m skeptical of the claim that ‘Jesus was very clear’ about this. The author (or community of authors/editors) may possibly have preserved the gist of JC’s thinking on this topic, but you’re just not going to get verbatim quotes through this sort of mechanism.

          • David Ashton

            What about the millions past and present who have never even heard of “His son Jesus”?

            What do you think of Prof Casey’s “Is John’s Gospel True?” (1996)?

            Is the “lake of fire a brimstone” literal? Is this “second death” eternal torture or extermination?

          • Sick of it

            The lake of fire is for eternal torment, not destruction. People will pray for destruction, but God will not hear them.

          • David Ashton

            Charming. Who could not fail to worship such a loving god who also drowned innocent babies in a global deluge and sent his own “son” to be tortured and killed?

            Mark 3.28-9. I Tim 2.3-4. 2 Pet 3.9.

          • silviosilver

            Giving credit to an obviously anthropomorphic being in whose existence you believe in a literal fashion is pretty damn ludicrous, hard to argue with that. But if you conceive of “God” or “gods” as kind of “spiritual force,” it’s quite easy to maintain faith in the “core” while excusing anthropomorphic traits attributed to the entity as the excesses of religious enthusiasm.

            Secondly, my guess is you’d be surprised at how many of our non-religious convictions share the same form as religious beliefs. Typically we’re less conscious of having invented the idea “in our own heads,” but when you consider the form of the ideational construct–which, in the form you imagine it in your mind, certainly doesn’t exist out there in the real world –the relationship between it and religious ideas becomes much clearer.

            If this is the way our minds are structured to operate then it seems that not only do we have little choice but to operate on the basis of mental constructs, to the extent we’re determined to live satisfying lives it’s in fact incumbent upon on to choose which mental constructs will serve as our guiding lights, be they based on scientifically discernible reality or be they based on the stuff of our own invention. Naturally, wild, crackpot ‘voodoo’ beliefs will get you into trouble soon enough, but subtler spiritual conceptions whose focus is on providing meaning to human existence can fare enviously well.

        • David Ashton

          Liberalism, Marxism and PC are substitutes for supernatural religion, and have counterfeit copies of its methods and institutions.

          • Luca

            Liberalism is a cult.

          • David Ashton

            Agreed.

        • King of My Castle

          When a man rejects the Truth, he’ll believe anything.

          • David Ashton

            Who defines “the Truth” in the Christian religion? Catholics, Calvinists, Lutherans, Adventists….?

          • Pelagian

            The Magisterium of the church founded by Christ, the Catholic Church descended from St. Peter and his see in Rome. And there are loads of theology on that. It’s not just a self-serving notion.

          • David Ashton

            I used to be interested in these RC apologetics, spending many Saturdays in boyhood at the THEN excellent Catholic Central Library at Westminster, until the effects of Vatican 2 on “scholars” eroded scriptural credibility. The last time I attended Mass was to cheer Cardinal Mindzsenty, I am that old. “There is tragedy in the spectacle” (Ayn Rand).

            I still try to keep an open mind, an interest in religion and NT origins, and do not attack religious allies of any kind in the effort to protect the “white nations” from external invasion, but these personal thoughts are a bit out of place here..

          • Pelagian

            It’s certainly therapeutic to visit Amren (as I do everyday), but if you want a solution, you need to look into the Catholic church. A solution should never be out of place.

          • David Ashton

            I spent years “looking” into the Catholic Church, attending Mass, unsuccessfully trying get an answer to prayers, studying very many of its writers, and only a few weeks ago having another fruitlessly disappointing conversation and correspondence with our local priest. I now leave matters to God, if he exists.

          • Katherine McChesney

            Ho hum. That is a myth. Peter, who was a married man, never travelled to Rome. If you read the New Testament books of St Paul you will see that he was the Apostle whose ministry took him to Rome. And the Roman Catholic church was never part of Jesus Christs ministry.

          • David Ashton

            Peter writes a letter in the NT from “Babylon” which is a safety codeword for Rome used by Christians and Jews facing contemporary persecution, and could well be the “another place” in Acts. Paul tells the Romans that he has no wish to build on another man’s foundation, and early Christian writers outside the NT took this to refer to Peter. At the end of Matthew’s gospel there is a clear reference to an uninterrupted apostolic teaching mission to all nations throughout time under divine guidance, i.e. a “catholic” church. My personal reason for not believing this is that modern RC scholars themselves question its authenticity.

          • King of My Castle

            The magisterium of the Catholic Church. The Holy Spirit instructs through it.

          • Sick of it

            The Word of God, David, the Word of God. Who cares what someone in a funny hat or fancy suit has to say about deeper issues?

          • David Ashton

            What is the Word of God? Books selected by the Roman Catholic Church in the 4th century? And if his “word” is quite clear why are there so many denominations with different views on what we need to do or think to be “saved” whatever that means. Predestination? Faith without works? Eternal torture? Global deluge? Trinity? Virgin birth? Private interpretation? 2 Peter and Daniel genuine?
            Eve and a talking reptile? God walking in the Garden of Eden? Hour of crucifixion? Day of Last Supper? People emerging from the tombs being seen in Jerusalem? Anointing with oil? He that believeth – what? – shall be condemned.

          • Sick of it

            The Word of God is the Bible. Why are there so many different interpretations? Because people don’t read the Bible, David. It really is that simple. You can refuse to believe, but that doesn’t make it false.

            As a matter of fact, I would be dead if not for numerous miracles. I’ve met people who have benefited from even greater miracles (including literal resurrection from a corpse torn asunder, long after the brain was dead and neural connections wiped out).

          • David Ashton

            Your resurrection story is interesting enough for the Moderator, I hope, to allow it here. Do you know of cases where new limbs were provided for amputees?

            The western world needs a resurrection of another kind at present.

            Irenaeus, Luther, Calvin and John Thomas read the Bible, but had different interpretations, and probably you have your own. The “Bible” is not a single book, but a collection made long after the death of the first disciples of Jesus and after considerable debate as to which items should be included.

            The first Christians did not have it, and many for centuries after either could not read or did not have personal copies. They relied on church teaching. 2 Peter 3.16.

          • Luca

            All religions are man made, that is why there are so many. The “better” religions such as the many denominations of Christianity were invented by people with higher IQ’s and who recognized the wisdom of controlling people through laws, morality and spirituality.

            The lesser religions are created by the people with lesser IQ’s strictly. Islam is a great example,

            I pray there is a God, but man-made religions do not interest me that much. I found them hypocritical and nonsensical when I was a child. I choose not to insult them because I believe certain religious (especially Christian) principals are very sound and good for humanity. We could also say these principles are just good lessons in morality that are enforced with the fear of death.

          • David Ashton

            You could start an interesting debate with this view. I think the mystery of existence and “fear of death” themselves have had a part to play, but I must resist the temptation to stray into this argument, as I have a writing deadline for another project. All I would say here is that the “whites of the west” cannot afford to put their energies into an intellectual civil war over Christian beliefs when we are all endangered by attacks on our reproductive survival.

      • LACounty

        The problem with your comment is that it’s disrespectful to some members here. Most of us on Amren are here for the same reasons. I respect Atheists and would never try to convert one nor disrespect them by suggesting they’ll eventually grow up and put their imaginary belief with the other relics of immaturity. If you simply disagree with King Castle, no harm done. Best wishes to you, Sir.

      • Bossman

        Islam is bastardized and plagiarized Christianity and Judaism.

        • Anglokraut

          I actually agree with you on that. Still don’t believe in a god, or gods, or fairies, brownies, or magic. I still hold out hope for unicorns, though.

          • Anglokraut

            Wow, some people here really can’t stand the thought that an atheist can also be a race realist. Why on Earth would someone think that the argument that non-Whites and Whites have quantifiable differences, and the decades of research on this argument, would only be found and read by people who are religious?

      • Katherine McChesney

        Christianity is NOT on it’s way out. When persecuted in the past, the church was driven underground, but it thrived and grew. Reformed Protestantism will never die. It’s adherence to the Scriptures and love for Jesus Christ will keep it going until the Second Coming.

      • IstvanIN

        Christianity being on its way out is a very sad thing. Christianity is the foundation for our Western civilization. It provides a moral framework, helps us determine right from wrong, gives us a guide on how to live our lives. It is good to have someone or something that is bigger than us to bring us altogether. Most importantly, I believe, it gives us hope. A life without a moral framework and hope, I feel, leads many people to just live a material life for today, with no thought for the future and no consideration for their eternal soul. Why not drink, drug and sleep around if there is no point to anything?

        Additionally we need rituals to mark the milestones of our lives. Religion provides many of these rituals. I wish I could express what I feel in my heart, but I think we have a huge emptiness in our lives when we abandon the words of Christ. A traditional sermon always moves me.

        • Anglokraut

          Why not drink, drug, and sleep around? Because medical science has shown us that doing that is really, really bad for you. I don’t need a religious epiphany to know that Paul Walker’s idea of a good time was actually a really bad idea, or that auto-erotic asphyxiation is probably not the best way to spend a night alone.

          If you feel empty without religion, well that’s on you, and not anyone else. Just because others don’t feel any need for that religious aspect in their lives does not make them defective. Or deviant.

          • IstvanIN

            Who called anyone deviant or defective? Not me. You said that. Sorry, but our culture is very intertwined with Christianity and as we lose our faith we lose the bedrock of our culture and our people.

            Maybe if people had a better moral foundation they wouldn’t screw up their lives so permanently.

            The end of Christianity is the end of us.

          • Anglokraut

            The majority of the written opinions on this thread is that atheists are defective, deviant people, therefore I must be a defective, deviant person. However, I have done nothing to support this conclusion except voice an unpopular opinion.

          • Pelagian

            I certainly didnt call you that. I think it is in the western tradition to have respect for unbelief and unbelievers.

          • Anglokraut

            No, you didn’t call me anything negative, but that is why I said that the “majority” opinion has been negative. One can’t deny that there has been more negative than positive responses to my comments. Oh well, can’t please everybody.

          • IstvanIN

            I certainly never said that, and quite frankly atheists tend to be very rude to Christians, saying that we believe in magic and fairy tales. The only issue I have with atheists, other than not understanding how someone can have no faith, is when they try to take Christianity out of the public square and out of our public rituals. If one is in fact an atheist, how does seeing a creche, or hearing one nation under God, or any number of traditional Christian-American symbols, shake their lack of faith? Rather like the Jews who fight to get crosses removed form public monuments and cemeteries, do they think they will turn Christian all of a sudden? I don’t think I would turn Jewish at the sight of a menorah. But then I don’t understand why so many Christians go out of their way to support Jews but denigrate Mormons.

            I support freedom of religion in this country, although allowing non-Christian immigration was, and is, a grave mistake.

          • Zaporizhian Sich

            Whites existed for tens of thousands of years without it, and pagan religions DID teach one thing Christianity doesn’t now. That is our enemies are to be ground under our boots when we are threatened or attacked by them.

      • Garrett Brown

        What in the world have you been readin/hearing? Islam is taking over the world. Islam is growing exponentially, taking over every other religion in its’ path. Islam is GROWING at an incredibly fast rate, NOT declining… not even a little. In 50 years it will be the dominant religion in 80% of European countries. No Muslims are realizing how backwards” they are.

        You are very, very wrong.

        • Anglokraut

          Perhaps you misread my post, but I never said anything about Islam being in decline–I’m quite aware of its dangerous nature. I was referring to Muslims with access to the internet realizing that their own religious leaders ordered a halt on any new developments in math, science, and medicine because it was causing people to ask uncomfortable questions. So while the west experienced the Renaissance, the Ottomans stagnated.

          • Garrett Brown

            The only thing Muslims are using the internet for are outing their “radical” members of their religion. That woman that had acid poured on her face went to court with a hijab on. She was still proudly Muslim.

    • David Ashton

      In Britain there are various reasons for non-attendance at church, but among them is the suspicion or realisation that its leading clerics don’t believe in the religion much themselves, and have turned the “Church” of “England” into a soggy and unpatriotic adjunct to the welfare/therapeutic state, with a few rituals, coffee mornings and flower-arrangements for elderly female hymn-singers thrown in.

      Recently a Catholic Church was closed and turned into a mosque, which may or may not be better than a store for “adult vids” like a formerly derelict Methodist church I noticed in London some years ago.

      The first key to renaissance is indeed for white people to have more babies, just one more in each family would be enough. The second is to teach them the heritage.

      • King of My Castle

        I got my six kids. Doing my part!

        • David Ashton

          Well, done!

        • Anglokraut

          Not sure why someone hit the down button, but it wasn’t I.

          • King of My Castle

            There’s always some jerk who down-votes something. 🙂

        • David Ashton

          Well done!

      • the sound the flood the hour

        In America most church leaders are compromised by their tax exempt status and many of them promote pro-government propaganda via deals with the DHS. The traditional Christian message has been diluted because of this and it accounts for much of the reason why people turned their back on the religion. I don’t know if this applies to England in particular but its worth considering when one examines the secularization of western people all over the world.

        • Katherine McChesney

          The churches who are apostate and in league with the Devil himself are the members of the World Council of Churches. They are the churches who’ve adopted Social Justice and political correctness.

          • the sound the flood the hour

            Those places are literally houses of satan.

        • David Ashton

          The Church of England is a “national” church, as are some Orthodox churches. It officiates at state events, and it is better to have it exclusively at the Coronation of our Monarch than a multifaith or secular swearing-in. But the effect in recent years has been a secularization of the church rather than a spiritualization of the state. No time to add more.

      • Zaporizhian Sich

        I refuse to attend church because I can see what a fraud it is, any church that supports Israel and Zionism is nothing I want any part of.

  • D.B. Cooper

    Coming soon, mark my words, but what’s left of you Europeans don’t care, do you?

    • King of My Castle

      Nice!!

    • MBlanc46

      I hate to think of what’s going to happen to the National Gallery and the Louvre.

    • David Ashton

      We DO care. But we don’t need lessons from American anglophobes.

      • Brian

        Know that there are many of us here of English descent whose hearts are breaking for what is happening in our ancestral homeland, and wish those like you the best in turning things around, by voice or by force.

        • David Ashton

          Thank you, Brian. We need more international friendship and co-operation, not in-fighting and defeatism.

          • Zaporizhian Sich

            If we lose our nations, then the only nation we will have left will be our race.

          • David Ashton

            We shall try not to lose them, but I get your point.

        • David Ashton

          My grateful reply has not appeared.

    • Laura Dilworth

      soon, there will be a civil war in europe

      • Zaporizhian Sich

        There is no other way out than a very bloody civil war. I only hope those who cannot be named suffer the just consequences of their role behind it.

        • Laura Dilworth

          If the Muslims prevail, we will not have European allies anymore

          • Zaporizhian Sich

            Then Russia, China or even the U.S. will probably lay waste to it with hundreds of nuclear weapons if the Muslims prevail.

          • Laura Dilworth

            hmmm

          • Laura Dilworth

            I can’t bear to think of losing the louvre, sistine chapel, etc

          • Zaporizhian Sich

            That is why if things come to that, we must nuke Mecca and Medina off the face of the Earth, literally along with Tel Aviv.

          • Anglokraut

            Wouldn’t a neutron bomb be a better choice? It leaves the architecture and doesn’t poison the environment.

          • Zaporizhian Sich

            When you consider what they have done to us already, and will do if they get the chance, I think poetic justice decrees those places should be turned into big radioactive craters. Then they can stand as a monument just like the Trinity, Sedan and Castle Bravo craters stand as monuments of the nuclear age.

          • Laura Dilworth

            we don’t seem headed in that direction. i mean if we keep electing obamas…

    • Laura Dilworth

      some of them do

  • Spartacus

    This is just a smoke-screen to cover how many non-White babies there are… That’s what really matters. In the under 5, non-Whites are probably nearing a third if not more.

    • jeffaral

      Yes, the Muslims want to destroy Israel, therefore they supposedly must be the greatest threat to mankind.

  • Luca

    The muslims can never win a conventional war against the west, therefore they have had to develop a number of unconventional strategies. The most effective one is the immigration/population bomb used against weak-minded western government (virtually all of them) too afraid to admit what’s really going on for fear of being called a racist or non-progressive nation.

    They will win this war without firing a shot. They will simply overpopulate the countries they have emigrated to and subsist off of the welfare state.

    Once they consume the host country and cut off their livelihood, they will degenerate into sectarian violence and consume each other. It’s happening in Iraq as we speak.

    • MBlanc46

      It’s an own goal. The only reason they’re in is that we (the Brits, French, Germans, Canadians, and US) opened the door and invited them in. It’s going to turn out to be cultural suicide.

      • NoMosqueHere

        Let’s call a spade a spade, shall we? Mass expulsions are long overdue.

        • MBlanc46

          But not on the agenda anytime soon.

        • Zaporizhian Sich

          Not enough, I think it will lead to Ivan the Terrible and Vlad the Impaler style solutions to their unwelcome and presence in our lands against our will.

  • sbuffalonative

    One in ten children under the age of four is now Muslim in England and Wales. Cameron to address Parliament that this is ‘not good enough. More must be done!’

  • MBlanc46

    The British will rue the day they ever let the first Pakistani in.

    • sbuffalonative

      The problem being that those in power today will long since be retired with their pensions, living in gated communities or abroad. These people are selfish and shortsighted.

      • MBlanc46

        I don’t blame them so much for being selfish and short-sighted. Those are pretty common human traits. I do rather blame ordinary people (such as myself) for allowing them to fleece us as badly as they’ve been able to do.

    • David Ashton

      Many of us did then, and do now, but the people literally had no control over these events and little say in the matter. I am becoming more optimistic as the realities hit home.

      • MBlanc46

        As a former resident of the UK and something of an Anglophile, I hope there’s still time to save Britain from the hordes.

        • Luca

          I hope there is still time to save Britain from itself.

        • David Ashton

          You know us…we wake up late and then act.

  • Ella

    At least Britain has not passed up the US stats – Hispanics 17% of the population. 52% of babies born today are nonwhite in USA as the White population continues to age much like Europe. The average age for Whites is 42 unlike Hispanics at 25. So guess who will have more babies.

    • David Ashton

      What is D. B. Cooper’s view on this?

    • jeffaral

      I really don’t understand why some people are hysterical about Muslims whiile the real problem is Hispanics in the USA and subsaharian Africans in Europe.

      • David Ashton

        In Europe there are two main problems, not one. “By 2030, 30% of the population in Europe will be Muslim” (Mullah Krekar, 2006). Maybe not, but the prospect cannot be ignored.

      • Bossman

        Muslims are a big problem because they are irrational fanatics who commit great acts of violence which kill innocent people.

      • NoMosqueHere

        Islam is a religious and political death cult that seeks territorial and religious conquest though terrorism. It is ordered by Allah through the mass murdering, pedophile, terrorist warlord muhammed. The cowardly PC white Europeans are condemning their progeny to either dhimmitude or violent death.

        • KissThe Pussy

          Couldn’t have said it better myself. jeffaral has obviously been living under a rock.

    • Bossman

      And according to what I’ve read, these Hispanic babies are born healthier than white babies. If you don’t believe me, then Google “Hispanic paradox” and tell me what you discovered.

  • jeffaral

    In fact attendance to churches is exploding thanks to massive immigration from mostly christian countries like Nigeria.

    • Bossman

      That is very true. Even in New York City, they are revitalizing church attendance. That is because most of them are still hopelessly naive, superstitious and ignorant.

      • Anglokraut

        My atheistic head hurts right now…Christianized Africans are “naive, superstitious and ignorant.” So are you saying that Christianized Europeans are none of these things?

    • David Ashton

      Not entirely good news. Watch their services on TV.

  • jeffaral

    Did the Muslims destroy Detroit? Btw there is a church on each corner of Detroit.

    • Bossman

      Do you want Detroit to become Somalia? Somalia is both African and Muslim.

    • Alexandra1973

      Hamtramck, a city pretty much surrounded by Detroit (but borders Highland Park), used to be a Polish enclave. Now I hear it’s all Muslims.

      Look at Detroit on Google Earth. See all the mosques.

  • jeffaral

    What is good in European Christianity is non-biblical

  • Bossman

    Islam is a religion that has never left the Middle Ages.

  • silviosilver

    I’m not sure how accurate it is to say that it’s “still around.” The fact that it’s around has much more to do with revivalist efforts than any organic sustenance. But I grant your basic point.

    I myself find much that’s attractive about the idea behind a native European religion; it’s the application of it that I find underwhelming. People are obviously much more attracted to it for the ethnic connection than for its religious merits, but coming straight out and saying this tends to ruin the effect, so its important to establish some kind of religious content. This may seem straightforward but it’s actually quite complicated.

    With Christianity it’s easy to disbelieve the dogmas but to attend church simply you like the tradition, the community, the conviviality. No one need know what you’re up to, and apart from fundamentalist churches, few people even bother to inquire – and if they were to inquire they’d be as likely as not to see much to recommend in your simplified approach.

    It’s harder to pull this off with paganism because there’s so much more awareness of how contrived the religious content is. People actually believe Christian dogmas, so as much as you might disregard the dogmas in the privacy of your mind, you can forgive (and even by touched by) those who produced them and define/revise/renew them. With paganism, it’s all so obviously contrived that it’s difficult to respect the dogma even as you disbelieve it.

    • LeGrandDerangement

      Neo-Paganism is as relevant as Kwanzaa.

  • David Ashton

    The trouble is that secular politicians ignorantly give land to mosques because of religious freedom which is not reciprocated by those who see these as footholds in the House of Conflict for future expansion from the House of Submission.

  • David Ashton

    Christians are not “threatening” like Muslims, but they don’t “threaten” Muslims (except in some African and Asian areas).

  • jeffaral

    Our laws are based on Common Law.

  • NoMosqueHere

    Unbelievable. The western nations have no idea what they’re getting themselves into with the muslims. Maybe some muslims are nice now, when their numbers are less than 10 percent. But when their numbers are in the 20, 30, and 40+ percent range, the muslims will stop being nice and start making real demands and territorial claims. The whites don’t have the will to defend their heritage; and they certainly won’t have the balls to engage in a real shooting war with the muslims. They will appease themselves into oblivion and second class status in the lands they built from nothing. .

    • the sound the flood the hour

      The people in charge know exactly what they are doing. This is part of a gradual and deliberate displacement of the European people that is taking place all over the world.

      • David Ashton

        What are the motives of the “people in charge” for this retrograde action?

        • the sound the flood the hour

          I don’t think it matters. You don’t need a motive to prove what someone is doing and what the results will be from it. All you have to do is look at the trends occurring in every Western country.

    • Zaporizhian Sich

      Those who cannot be names and treacherous white gentile elites know exactly what they are getting their nations into, and middle and working class whites in particular. What they don’t think about is the fact the consequences of their actions will be their own deaths at either the hands of violent Muslims or even more violent, oppressed and vengeful whites who weren’t asked if they wanted to be displaced in their own lands.

  • MBlanc46

    And it’s about time that the citizens start demanding those rights, because the elites will never yield to them otherwise.

  • MBlanc46

    I’m getting close enough to the end that I can think about what might be worth making a stand for. I think that I can see making the bastards have to pry the Vermeer or the Van Eyck from my cold, dead hands.

    • Zaporizhian Sich

      I am well, since I am well aware I have fewer days ahead for me than I have lived already. Older white men with little or nothing to fear, and lose any longer will be a waking nightmare for our enemies.

      • LACounty

        Same here. Can’t take my bullets with me.

      • MBlanc46

        If I’m ever given six months to live, I’m going to try to put them to very good use.

  • IstvanIN

    Hootin’ and hollerin’ and fallin’ out, basically a voodoo service with a little Santeria thrown in.

  • David Ashton

    “American Pie” or “Siegfried’s Funeral March”…?

    However, for time being I’ll stick to Parry’s “Jerusalem”.

  • MikeofAges

    The barriers to political actualization are formidable and the demographics under universal suffrage grow more unfavorable year after year. People talk about continued massive Third World immigration, but it doesn’t have to be massive. A low but steady rate will accomplish the same thing. If today one-tenth of British newborns are Muslim, in three decades the number probably would 20 percent even with no new immigration whatsoever. The Muslim are not only Muslim. Phyletically, they are aboriginal Semites. Even if their in-migration stopped and over generations they assimilated culturally and left their ancestral religion behind, their presence would mean the eventual extinction of the historic English type. The only argument against making this an issue is that it should not be treated as a problem. There is no possible denying that it will happen. Not only in England, but also inScandinavia.

  • LeGrandDerangement

    What centrist version was that? I’m interested, have never heard that.

  • Garrett Brown

    I think everyone can agree England is the quickest declining white country. Has anyone else seen differently? Maybe Sweden or Germany?

    • Anglo

      These are the last figures I found:

      Austria (2.2%)

      Muslims came to Austria during the 1960s as migrant workers from Turkey, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia. Vienna is now estimated to be 10 percent Muslim.

      Italy (2.4%)

      The recent arrival of illegal North African migrants onto Italy’s Mediterranean island of Lampedusa has placed the subject to Muslim immigration on the agenda. However, Italy’s Muslim population is relatively low compared to its neighbors. The anti-immigrant Northern league want to halt further migration as well as stop the construction of any more mosques on Italian soil.

      United Kingdom (2.8%)

      British Muslims are overwhelmingly from Pakistan and Bangladesh, a community that has had deep roots in the UK for at least fifty years. UK Muslims are concentrated in the urban areas and are among Britain’s poorest and worst-educated and housed. Muslims in the UK have been heavily scrutinized since the 2001 terrorist attacks in the US, and 2005 bombings in London.

      Denmark (3.0%)

      In the early 1970s many Muslims emigrated to Denmark from Turkey, Pakistan, Bosnia and Morocco. Later asylum-seekers arrived in huge numbers, mostly from Iraq, Iran, Gaza and Somalia.

      Switzerland (3.1%)

      The majority of Swiss Muslims are from Kosovo in the former Yugoslavia, with large numbers from Turkey as well. The construction of mosques in Switzerland has become a contentious political issue. In 2007 the city council of Bern rejected a proposal to build a large Islamic cultural center.

      Sweden (3.1%)

      Immigration by Muslims into Sweden commenced in the 1970s; a great many are from Iraq and Iran, with sizable numbers from the former Yugoslavia.

      Belgium (3.6%)

      Belgium’s Muslims, who are concentrated in Brussels, are generally from Turkey or Morocco.

      Germany (3.7%)

      The majority of Muslims in Germany are Turkish, who have been in the country in large numbers since in 1960s, when they were invited as “guest workers.”

      Netherlands (5.4%)

      Most Muslims in Holland originated in Morocco and Turkey, who were recruited by the Dutch government in the 1960s. Politicians are increasingly questioning the place of Islam in a modern secular Holland. In 2004, Mohammed Bouyeri, a Dutch citizen of Moroccan descent murdered film director Theo van Gogh who made a film critical of Islam. he anti-immigrant politician Geert Wilders of the Dutch Party for Freedom was put on trial last year for inciting racial hatred.

      France (10%)

      France has Western Europe’s largest Muslim population by far, the vast majority of whom come from Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco (all former French colonies). In recent years, France has seen riots by Muslim youths in the bleak suburbs outside of Paris and other cities, over poverty and discrimination. French President Nicholas Sarkozy called for a national debate on Islam in France and repeatedly called for the banning of Muslim outerwear like the hijab.

      • Garrett Brown

        Ah, so it is France. Thank you for the numbers. Let’s hope Le Pen can win some votes next election and get in office.

      • KissThe Pussy

        Thanks for your post however I disagree with a few figures. For example the article states UK rate at 4.8 end of 2011 probably 5.3 now certainly not 2.8 as per your figures.
        You have quoted France at 10%, My understanding is it could be as high as 20%

  • Magician

    I wonder if what we should be worried about is not white women choosing black men over white men and give birth to non-white babies and have her white genes permanently disappear… but rather, it is the extremely low birthrate among white families as opposed to muslim families who give birth to 5 muslim children or more funded happily by our anti-white goverment

    • Zaporizhian Sich

      Indeed, enabling them to outbreed us is genocide.

  • bilderbuster

    No it isn’t.
    Mexico dumped it’s garbage in the US.
    We dump all our non White garbage in Mexico.
    They need a good dose of diversity there.
    Turnabout’s fair play.

  • Zaporizhian Sich

    Men whose backs are against the wall or people whose existence is threatened also do not care about being liked. They will kill as many enemies as they have to using any and all means necessary, even if that makes them a hated people thereafter. Look no further than Israel for an example of that. Whites need to realize they were never liked by the rest of the world, and never will be EVER. It’s time we start thinking of our own survival, reject the other in ever respect, and take back our lands.

  • Zaporizhian Sich

    Ethnic cleansing did not bring peace to the Former Yugoslavia, far from it. The Serbs never forgot what the Nazis working with the Utashe regime in Croatia did to them. The Serbs were victimized several times over by the break up of Yugoslavia. First they were killed, raped, terrorized and forced out of their homes in the other republics. After they fought back the West devastated Serbia, armed the Muslims and Croats who massacred more Serbs, then aided and abetted Albanians who are doing to them what the Mexicans and Muslims are doing to US in our own lands.That fact is conveniently forgotten, they were effectively stripped of territory that was taken from them by first a slow ethnic invasion that culminated with a brutal campaign of murder, rape and wanton destruction against the Serbian people. Now they are even under attack in Serbia itself, and Kosovo is a beach head for the Islamic Jihad against all whites. The Serbs are going to retaliate for this, you can be sure of it. Even worse, what happened to the Serbs is going to happen to the white population of England, France, Germany, Australia, the U.S. and Canada, let alone Greece, and every other white nation. Did Serbs commit atrocities? Of course they did, but nobody knows that Muslims and Croats committed at least as many against THEM. Indeed, they committed numerous war crimes for which few if any were prosecuted.

  • Anglo

    Kiss and European, thanks for the updates. Those figures do keep changing rapidly. This is not good.