Can a White Director Make a Great Black Movie?

John Singleton, Hollywood Reporter, September 19, 2013

Whenever a black-themed film comes out, I get the call. And even more stops on the street. “Yo, man. What did you think of that flick?” The truth is, I wish folks would ask me what I think of some general releases. {snip} But, hey, I guess commenting on all things black is my lot in life, being that I’m a recognizable African-American face in an industry that isn’t exactly the gold standard when it comes to diversity.

Like everything else in Hollywood, though, black films tend to come in waves, and by some standards 2013 is turning into a banner year. Nearly a dozen black movies will be released before it’s over. And with awards season just around the corner, three indie flicks are right in the mix: Ryan Coogler’s remarkable and unquestionably authentic debut, Fruitvale Station; my friend Lee Daniels’ The Butler, which has drawn a diverse crowd and topped the box office three weeks in a row; and the film everyone is waiting for, Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave.

Hollywood’s black film community has always had a one-for-all-and-all-for-one attitude, openly cheering the success of any black-driven movie in the hope its box-office success will translate into more jobs and stories about people of color. But, at the same time, the success of black-themed movies like The Help and this year’s 42 points to a troubling trend: the hiring of white filmmakers to tell black stories with few African-Americans involved in the creative process.

{snip}

While 12 Years a Slave doesn’t open until Oct. 18, I’ve seen it and can tell you it’s a work of art. McQueen, who is black and from the U.K., has created a raw, unflinching look at a black man’s descent into one of the darkest chapters of American history. It’s as authentic as it gets. And there should be Oscar nods for McQueen; screenwriter John Ridley; lead actor Chiwetel Ejiofor, who gives the performance of a lifetime; and, hopefully, Michael Fassbender, who plays the most compelling big-screen villain this year. (It should be noted 12 Years a Slave would not have seen the light of day if not for Brad Pitt, who produced the film and has a small but crucial role in it. There are few stars as big-hearted as Pitt with an interest in exploring challenging subjects. More should definitely follow his bold example.)

This past spring also saw the release of 42, which was written and directed by Brian Helgeland. I took my whole family to the theater and was happy to see that Jackie Robinson’s inspiring story was well told. {snip}

And I was delighted to see my childhood hero Harrison Ford in an underrated character performance as Branch Rickey. For me, Helgeland–with support from Jackie’s widow, Rachel Robinson, who served as a consultant, and black producer Darryl Pryor–hit it out of the park. 42 wasn’t overly moralistic and didn’t sugarcoat the hardships Robinson endured on and off the field while integrating Major League Baseball.

Yet I couldn’t help but wonder how different Spike Lee’s version of Jackie’s story would’ve been had he gotten the financing to direct his planned biopic years ago when he had Denzel Washingtonattached to star. {snip}

One could argue that Lee couldn’t get his film made and Helgeland did, end of the story. But hold up. There’s more to it. What if the commercial success of “black films” like 42 and The Help, which also had a white director, are now making it harder rather than easier for African-American writers and directors to find work?

That is exactly what people in certain Hollywood circles are debating. When I brought up the issue with a screenwriter friend, he replied, “It’s simple. Hollywood feels like it doesn’t need us anymore to tell African-American stories.” The thinking goes, “We voted for and gave money to Obama, so [we don’t need to] hire any black people.”

{snip}

I could go on and on about the white directors who got it right and others who missed the mark. But my larger point is that there was a time, albeit very brief, when heroic black figures were the domain of black directors, and when a black director wasn’t hired, the people behind the film at least brought on a black producer for his or her creative input and perspective. Spielberg did that on The Color Purple (Quincy Jones) and Amistad (Debbie Allen). Tarantino had Reggie Hudlin on Django Unchained.

But now, that’s changing; several black-themed movies are in development with only white filmmakers attached, including a James Brown biopic. {snip}

A compelling argument can be made that Brian Grazer, the project’s primary producer, has had multiple successes with black talent such as Eddie Murphy and Denzel. And Mick Jagger also is involved, and the Brits tend to have a greater appreciation for African-American creative culture than most white Americans.

Still, it gives one pause that someone is making a movie about the icon who laid down the foundation of funk, hip-hop and black economic self-reliance with no African-American involvement behind the scenes. One of Brown’s most famous lines was, “I don’t want nobody to give me nothing; open up the door and I’ll get it myself.” How is that possible when the gatekeepers of this business keep the doors mostly locked shut in Hollywood?

In the black film community, the consensus is that we’re entering a new era of “Al Jolson movies.” Jolson, for the uninitiated, was the star of the first “talkie,” The Jazz Singer in 1927, and is best known for donning blackface and singing “Mammy.” He is an apt symbol for what slowly is becoming the norm in Hollywood. Even when there are black directors or writers involved, some of the films made today seem like they’re sifted of soul. It’s as if the studios are saying, “We want it black, just not that black.”

Audiences, though, can smell what’s real and what isn’t. And there is a noticeable difference between pictures that have significant contributions from African-Americans behind the scenes and those that don’t. That’s why I can fully relate to the disappointment some friends feel upon hearing about producers holding meetings on black-themed movies without even noticing that no one in the room speaks the language or intimately understands that world.

{snip}

Some in the black film community think that Hollywood needs to pass a Rooney Rule like the NFL, which requires teams to interview a minority candidate when looking to fill a head-coaching position. But that’ll never fly. In many ways, The Help‘s $170 million domestic box office set a new paradigm for how Hollywood wants its black pictures: uplifting, sentimental and inoffensive. It’s no one individual filmmaker’s fault. It reflects the latent racism that influences what gets made and what doesn’t in the studio system.

What Hollywood execs need to realize is that black-themed stories appeal to the mainstream because they are uniquely American. Our story reminds audiences of struggles and triumphs, dreams and aspirations we all share. And it is only by conveying the particulars of African-American life that our narrative become universal. But making black movies without real participation by black filmmakers is tantamount to cooking a pot of gumbo without the “roux.” And if you don’t know offhand what “roux” is, you shouldn’t be making a black film.

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  • RebelliousTreecko

    Can a Black director make a great White movie?

    • Tim_in_Indiana

      Can a Black director make a great White movie?

      Exactly. The downside of their smug question is that it carries the corollary that the reverse is also true, much as they may try to rationalize around it.

      • MikeofAges

        Actually, the otherwise detestable Spike Lee made a pretty good one, “Summer of Sam”. One of the curiosities of it was that the primary characters were Italian American but played by non-Italians. I suppose Lee was hoping to make the point that people are the products of their culture. But I doubt that there is such a vast genetic difference between many Italians and the other European nationalities of Mediterranean origin. “Son of Sam” killer David Berkowitz, who was Jewish, was played by an Italian American actor named Michael Badalucco.

        No one, of course, noticed that the actors and actresses were everything but Italian. OMG, that Lee is one twisted SOB. Not because of the casting in this movie. Because he just is.

    • Oil Can Harry

      “Can a white director make a great black movie?”

      This from a guy who’s never made a great movie himself and who has directed one film since 2005.

  • [Guest]

    >>>”Can a White Director Make a Great Black Movie?”

    Here’s a better question: Can black people be productive members of white society?

    • APaige

      No.

    • Rhialto

      Blacks are very effective at being re-productive members.

    • Sick of it

      The best question would include ‘on average’ afterword.

  • newscomments70

    Who even cares? So many of us are done with black-themed movies. Many of the recent ones have flopped. Hollywood tried so hard to sell us black America. Because of black on white crime, it is a complete failure. No one cares if a white director can create a black movie. That “unique” part of American history is over. Now is the time when we begin to fight back.

    • borogirl54

      Tyler Perry has been the most successful black director. His Madea movies have grossed millions. He is despised by other directors such as Spike Lee for relying on stereotypes. But unlike most directors, his movies have made money.

      • IstvanIN

        Blacks at work love his movies and recommend them highly to me.

        • Bardon Kaldian

          From what I’ve seen (not much), they’re sort of black Arcadia, a form of black escapism – just like chick lit is for young-and not so young- females.

      • newscomments70

        He is also a joke on South Park.

      • Brian

        I saw one of them and it seemed like a lowest-common-denominator minstrel show.

  • kjh64

    “being that I’m a recognizable African-American face in an industry that isn’t exactly the gold standard when it comes to diversity.”

    Oh, please. Blacks are OVER represented in TV and movies, You can’t turn your TV on without seeing a Black face.

    • Jefferson

      TV commercials that do not feature a single Bantu face are actually in the minority now. I drop my jaw every time I see a new commercial that does not show any Bantu faces, because they are becoming less and less common now.

      McDonald’s for example has gone completely Black now. Literally ALL of their commercials feature Black people.

      I can not remember the last time I saw an all White McDonald’s commercial. Maybe it was way back in the 1990s.

      • bigone4u

        Then let blacks only eat the overpriced garbage they call food at McDs. They’ve been having trouble with their sales revenue recently. Maybe you’ve identified the problem.

        • NorthSea

          Possibly due to the spate of black on white crimes that sometimes occur at those places.

      • Sick of it

        The 1980s more likely.

      • itdoesnotmatter

        Allstate or State Farm, can’t recall which, has a commercial portraying an Asian man with a bantu female sitting at an outdoor cafe, a biracial sprog in a stroller by their side.

        • Romulus

          The Asian was an agent trying to sell the black insurance.

          • itdoesnotmatter

            Thanks for the clarification. What a relief. I was about to cancel my State Farm coverage.

    • itdoesnotmatter

      When is the last time you saw a contemporary film with a black villain instead of the reverse, white villain, black hero?

      • jane johnson

        Check out Jack Reacher with Tom Cruise.

        • itdoesnotmatter

          Cue me, because I won’t watch a film with blacks in the cast.
          Is the black British guy, David Oyelow, [sp?] the hero/smart guy who must teach Cruise the ropes?
          p.s. You are one funny woman, jane. The Julia pun made me spew my tea.

          • jane johnson

            Nope, starts out looking like the squeaky-clean, authoritative boss-cop, but…you’ll have to see it. A pleasant surprise for realists like us. Sorry about your tea.

          • itdoesnotmatter

            No worry, Jane. I’ll check Reacher out.

            Am a whacked out cinemaholic with a large video library. Find myself staying with and rewatching oldies and classics more and more. They tend to be all white and non-pc.

          • NorthSea

            Also see “Zulu Dawn”, made 15 years after “Zulu”.

          • OlderWoman

            I agree. I only have Netflix but I never chose films with black actors. I always give black films one star although I never view them.

          • itdoesnotmatter

            I do the same thing on IMDB. It feels so good.

            It’s amazing how many film are made about “special forces,” on heavy duty top secret ops, the team always commanded by a black. Uh, it doesn’t work that way.

          • Brian

            The closer you get to the tip of the spear, the whiter it gets. The SEALs look as white as the Mormon Tabernacle choir.

          • itdoesnotmatter

            I know. My over-extended family has 2 SEAL officers on active duty, an active Ranger and a retired [nameless team] Delta Secret Op member involved in the training of ????s.

            One of our SEAL kids calls blacks “rocks,” because they struggle to finish the rigorous water training exercises. It annoys the other pups no end, because trainers must spend more time helping these losers pass and it slows things down.

            You see, SEALs are in trouble for their lack of “die-versity.” Almost NO blacks.

          • Brian

            It’s funny how, when absolute performance is required and affirmative action and other BS get tossed, things turn out this way.

            To be fair in this case, I’ve heard whites tend to have more of a ‘swimmer’s body’, long torso, long arms, and less height in the legs, whereas blacks have longer legs and shorter torsos. It may affect center of mass and such, and one thing could be an advantage in sprinting and the other in swimming. Even if this is all true though, it doesn’t explain the general trend toward whites in all elite military units.

          • FransSusan

            I wonder if swimming is their only problem with the certification process. Also, are they able to pass the intellectual part of the process?

          • FransSusan

            I agree. I make it a point to never watch movies with black actors.

      • Brian

        The Lord of the Rings trilogy? Well, not black villains exactly, but dark-skinned orcs and uruk-hai, and all the heroes are white.

    • JackKrak

      Riiiiiiiiiight – Hollywood is WAY behind the curve of “celebrating diversity” and could use a few lessons in inclusion and giving racial minorities a chance to make it.

      Tell us another one, Mr. Singleton.

  • IstvanIN

    And if you don’t know offhand what “roux” is, you shouldn’t be making a black film.
    Its a sauce invented by the French.

    • itdoesnotmatter

      That’s right. Roux blanc and roux noir.

      Ignorant groid criticizing anyone who doesn’t know the meaning of roux when he doesn’t know its derivation?

      • IstvanIN

        My point was it is a European invention. My mother made it (called
        Rantas in Hungarian) when I was a kid. I bet every European culture has
        a version of it. It isn’t black.

        • itdoesnotmatter

          I understood, Istvan. Some recipes call for a blackened version of roux, ergo, noir. Not darkened to the point of bitter, though. It’s a delicate balance to get it right.

    • jane johnson

      Julia Child missed her true calling…instead of The French Chef, she could’ve done Roux the Right Thing.

  • Audiences, though, can smell what’s real and what isn’t.

    A real “black” film is never going to be produced, because the truth hurts.

    • Jefferson

      Real Black films have been produced in the past when America was not as politically correct as it is today. Google “Menace To Society” for example or “Tales From The Hood”.

      Those types of films would NEVER get green lighted in Hollywood today, because they portray Blacks like how they really are.

      • So CAL Snowman

        “Menace To Society” is one of the more eye opening movies ever made. I would also put “Boyz N’ the Hood” up there as well, but Singleton tries way too hard to make Lawrence Fishburne a black jesus.

      • Sick of it

        Was Tales from the Hood that black version of Tales from the Crypt? If so, very entertaining.

  • borogirl54

    Also, many black and other minority filmmakers have difficulty receiving funding for their films. I remember black filmmaker Robert Townsend used his credit cards to finance his first film, Hollywood Shuffle. After this, he was able to get credit to make more films.

  • MekongDelta69

    Singleton has always been a white hater.

    Btw – I like the comments under the original article – as always.
    There are a TON of AmReners out there. Just keep recruiting…

  • Jenkem Huffington

    How about, can the group that is 2% of the population make a movie that isn’t complete propaganda with an agenda to tear down western CHRISTIAN society? There’s a certain “minority” group that’s 2% of the population but you can’t throw a bagel through Washington DC, Wall Street or Hollywood without hitting 5 of them.

  • Dave4088

    No John, most whites are getting sick and tired of the black version of race relations and U.S. history shoved down our throats even if they won’t admit it among polite company.

  • Luca

    If you want real black entertainment where all the people involved are black, just go to YouTube. It’s a nice slice of black Americana.

    • Or World Star Hip Hop for a real dose.

      • Luca

        The gift that keeps on giving.

  • Biff_Maliboo

    Non-negro Larry Cohen wrote, produced and directed “Black Caesar” in 1973.

    In the original ending, the title character is rolled and murdered by a pack of feral urban yoofs who have mistaken him for a drunk.

    Would a “black director” have been able to come up with such an honest, true-to-life ending?

  • bigone4u

    I wrote this comment for Derbyshire at Taki magazine last week, where it got moderated and few saw it. It mocks the shallow, phony Hollywood I despise. My best comment ever, IMO.
    From The New York Times, March 2014:

    The Trayvon Martin Story Sweeps Oscars

    Director Michael Moore added another bronze statue to his collection of Oscars, while The Trayvon Martin Story became the most honored film in Hollywood history last night.

    Moore, looking even more rotund than usual, thanked controversial writer John Derbyshire for his pivotal role in getting the film made: “I wish I could claim that the idea for the film was mine, but a racist named John Derbyshire gave me the idea. Although I normally refuse to work with racists, the Derb’s screenplay was brilliant and his Oscar is well deserved.” As a beaming Derbyshire was embraced by Moore, he returned the compliment, “Although I usually don’t work with hypocrites, Mr. Moore is certainly the fattest and worst dressed hypocrite I’ve ever worked with.” The two, who obviously hold each other in great affection, were seen lifting a glass or two at the Academy’s post-Oscar party.

    Moore’s widely acclaimed masterpiece also earned Oscars for Beyonce in the role of Rachel, and Mel Gibson as George Zimmerman. Gibson, clutching his Oscar, tears in his eyes, thanked Moore and his costars, before noting that, “Playing racists comes naturally to me.” Beyonce collected her Best Actress Oscar, while taking home a second award for Best Song, the triple platinum “Somewhere in Heaven, there’s Skittles.”

    Newcomer DeJuan earned his Oscar for his sensitive portrayal of the saintly Trayvon. DeJuan could not be present to receive his Oscar in person because of his incarceration for assaulting an elderly white man, but he sent his greetings to the Academy in a videotape made in the Florida prison where he is serving an eight year sentence. The venerable Barbra Streisand received his Oscar in DeJuan’s absence.

    • MikeofAges

      Try 2015 or 2016. Hollywood can’t get them out that fast.

    • newscomments70

      When I read that Mel Gibson was cast as George Zimmerman, I spit out coffee all over my new suit…20 dollar cleaning bill now. It’s worth it though.

  • Spartacus

    You know what a real black film is ? Zulu (1964) .

    • Luca

      1965 was the beginning of the end for America.

    • Planet of the Apes..no?

  • Evette Coutier

    A white director already made a great black movie. It’s called death wish. It’s about a white vigilante who goes around killing mostly black criminals. It’s the perfect black movie.

    • Sick of it

      I did always like Bronson movies.

    • capnmorgan5150

      It’s amazing what you can get done armed with only a sock full of pennies, lol!

    • skara_brae

      Nah. Add ’em up. Michael Winner cast mostly white hoodlums right through to Death Wish XVI or however many there were. Said thugs included the ever menacing Jurassic Jew Jeff Goldblum.

  • Eagle_Eyed

    Yawn. Another self-indulgent black person talking about black problems and how life could be better for blacks if they were allowed. You could give this guy a year to change everything he wanted to about Hollywood and he’d still complain blacks get the short end soon after. Nothing is ever good enough for blacks.

  • MekongDelta69

    Take a wild guess as to how many of these ‘black’ movies were directed by ‘non-colored’ people:

    http://en[dot]wikipedia[dot]org/wiki/List_of_blaxploitation_films

  • Mack0

    Black films only deal with the subject of racism. They are incapable of making a film about any other topic or in any other genre. Science Fiction or Fantasy are not an element of their culture.

    • Brian

      What about that POS that Will Smith and Jr. just did? Technically sci-fi, although I’ve also heard it called ‘the most expensive bar mitzvah gift ever’.

      • Mack0

        A love letter to Scientology directed by an Indian.

  • Funruffian

    “Our story reminds audiences of struggles and triumphs, dreams and aspirations we all share. And it is only by conveying the particulars of African-American life that our narrative become universal. But making black movies without real participation by black filmmakers is tantamount to cooking a pot of gumbo without the “roux.” And if you don’t know offhand what “roux” is, you shouldn’t be making a black film.”
    The only non-Black people who may feel that way are the ones who believe in the myth of Blacks in America. That’s right. Hollywood creates a myth that they struggled and triumphed, but Hollywood would never present the grisly details of endemic crime and disorder caused by Blacks. So I propose to Mr. Singleton that he create a film that accurately depicts post Civil Rights era Black history in all the cities such as Detroit, Harlem, Oakland, St. Louis, Chicago and Philadelphia. He is still blaming the inadequacy of Black involvement in film making with White Racism.
    Perhaps Blacks should form their own movies without having an experienced White director doing it for them. I’m all for that.

  • Bardon Kaldian

    With perhaps a few exceptions- I think we Whites are not very much interested in such movies. I’m not a parochial bigot, but even I’m tired of indubitable masterpieces depicting truly different rich cultures and sensibilities (Mizoguchi, Kiarostami, Kurosawa, Satyajit Ray,..). We Westerners have enough diversity to satisfy our curiosity about “others” (film masterpieces of Wajda, Bergman, Kieslowski, Godard, Tarkovsky…I omitted movies from past 10-15 years). Why bother with subculture of grunts, mumbo jumbo & depravity no mentally sane White person is authentically interested in ?

    • MikeofAges

      Don’t forget Clint Eastwood. No director in our time has challenged “the taboo against knowing who you are” more than he has.

      • Paul

        Please give examples

        • MikeofAges

          Gran Torino. Flags of Our Fathers. Letters from Iwo Jima. The Outlaw Josie Wales. Unforgiven. Those are films he directed, and not the only ones. Then there were films he was in, where he may or may not have had a role in developing the story. Some bear very largely on the issue. Others to a lesser degree. But a large portion of his movie work has at least something to do with that matter. His success as an outstanding director was surprising, considering his orgins. Allegedly, he was discovered while he was working digging swimming pools pools in Los Angeles. I think he already had ambitions as an actor though.

          • itdoesnotmatter

            Eastwood was taken to task for not casting any blacks in his Iwo Jima film. His answer, “blacks were not there,” or something of that nature.

          • MikeofAges

            That’s correct. He wanted to make an historically accurate film, not a war drama which could be a fictionalized version.

            Heck, Eastwood cast Morgan Freeman as Ned Logan in “Unforgiven”. It wasn’t written as a black part, but he was willing to cast it and direct it that way. As cinema, it worked out pretty well. But “Unforgiven” was fiction, not history. He had liberties he could take.

          • OlderWoman

            Spike Lee demanded he use black actors as heros who raised the flag. Clint sent him the message “Shut your mouth” and proceeded to film the true story.

          • CharlesFinley

            He said, roughly, “A guy like Spike Lee should shut his face.”

    • jane johnson

      Fellini, Coppola, and Zeffirelli.

      • itdoesnotmatter

        Hitchcock films are groid free, I’ve noticed. My favorite is “Notorious,” also reputedly his favorite as well.
        Few can do sinister as well as Claude Raines.

      • itdoesnotmatter

        Sergei Parajov, “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors.” Brilliant, and 100% groidless. Russian, a mixture of superstitious lore and cold, hard cultural reality.

        • Bardon Kaldian

          There are good things galore. For instance, “Ostrov”/Island. Or short TV series (7 episodes) about the life of Dostoevsky. Hmm…. no blacks there. Strange. No diversity in St.Petersburg or Baden-Baden in 1870s. We have to contact NAACP.

      • ShermanTMcCoy

        I liked Seven Samurai.

        • jane johnson

          Wasn’t that the basis for The Magnificent Seven?

        • Bardon Kaldian

          His even better films are “Ran” and “Throne of Blood”, both masterpieces based on Shakespeare. Just, these are high artistic accomplishments one can see now & then. Imagine you have to watch 100 Japanese movies where they constantly growl and shout & tender exchanges of romantic infatuation are expressed through threatening gestures and snarling. I’d rather commit suicide.

          • ShermanTMcCoy

            Good points. I also can only watch Battleship Potempkin and Birth of a Nation, and Alexander Nevsky once every couple of years or so. Ah yes, the Criterion Collection.

    • Bardon Kaldian

      To be even more explicit: a) blaxploitation movies- boring propaganda b) liberal films about blacks (Mississippi burning; one with pa & son Sutherland plus McConnaughey, about 2 white punks who raped a black girl etc., Oprah’s Butler- brainwashing pontification & unbelievable story), c) films & TV series like “Precious”, “The Wire” etc. Heart of Darkness. Not entertainment, not “art”. IMO- jump into a septic tank. No, thanks.

      • Brian

        The Wire was very well done, against David Simon’s intentions. He’s a huge egalitarian, but what I got from the show was a depressingly real picture of the dysfunction that blacks create wherever they exist, like a ‘farce of nature’. He would set his teeth on edge to think that his show was ammunition in the other direction.

        • Bardon Kaldian

          True. Although, they had a few completely unrealistic features: Omar as a black gay Robin Hood (such a person is hardly believable); also, the entire gang’s drug dealing operation via cell phones etc., which is of complexity no black- or white, for that matter- street gang could have devised. Still, a very good portrayal of A-A “culture” (ugh ….)

          • Brian

            You think the cell phone thing is silly? Perhaps, no idea. But the South American Latinos have some pretty clever tunnels and submarines.

  • MikeofAges

    I remember Spike Lee’s film bio of Malcolm X. Some of what Lee pointed out about Malcolm, as he is called, might well be true, but the reason why he came across as such a sweet guy in the film is because the actor who played him, Denzel Washington, is a rare man with a lot of decency in him. What we saw was Washington’s basic decency, not Malcolm’s.

    I remember, above all, the scene’s where Malcolm’s prison mentor, in course of instructing him in the proper use of language, goes through all of the dictionary entries which show that the word “black” is used in a negative context and the word “white” in a positive one. But Lee coyly left out one word, “whitewash”.

    His movie, although it did offer some valid positive insight into its subject, nevertheless was quite a whitewash. That, I think, is why John Singleton is nervous about the idea of white directors making black movies. No matter how well meaning they might be and how intent they are on covering up the negative, they just don’t understand all of the subtleties of how to whitewash the negatives away.

    Nothing new about Hollywood not wanting you to know what its movies are actually about. In that context, the early “blaxpolitation” film of the 1970s were remarkably forthright as to the extent that the black lower middle class and underclass were participants in a sordid and dissipated subculture rife with criminal inclination.

    • Brian

      I’m surprised the NAACP isn’t calling for a boycott of pool halls. Isn’t it obvious that the game of pool is hideously racist, with players using the white ball to knock the colored balls into holes and out of sight, and even winning the game by sinking the black ball?

  • Sick of it

    The most accurate portrayal is actually found on the news every single day.

  • MBlanc46

    Yet more whining by a privileged black about how dreadfully he’s discriminated against.

  • Sick of it

    Are there WASP directors anymore?

  • “Can a white director make a great black movie?”

    Since a black movie, “great” or otherwise is one I would never consider watching – even for free – this is an irrelevant question.

  • itdoesnotmatter

    Check out “Bait Car,” as well. Over the top.

  • itdoesnotmatter

    If you want to see an incredible film by the same name, I recommend Ingmar Bergman’s “Skammen,” [“Shame”].

  • 1proactive2

    Let’s see now, black made movies and their constant and predictable theme: blacks abused and otherwise disrespected as they go about life peacefully and honorably and with black heroes with IQs above 150. I’ve seen that movie, a few of them. Black movies really need to move on to another plot. The one blacks make have long been tiresome as well as ludicrous.

  • tech

    I’m sure he believes the French stole that term from blacks. I will never be shocked by the sheer volume of white inventions that blacks think they “own”.

  • Romulus

    Steve McQueen? IMO an insult to the late great actor.
    Furthermore, blacks are from Africa NOT the UK.

  • jane johnson

    Pawn Stars

  • itdoesnotmatter

    The First 48 has been accused of being the “most racist program on TV,” by some black celeb, don’t remember which one. The truth is so painful.

  • itdoesnotmatter

    To split hairs, a roux is not a sauce; it’s a sauce base that thickens. Melt fat, add flour, cook until floury taste is gone or to the shade of your choice, blanc or noir.
    “Okie gravy” roux [blanc] is made with bacon drippings, flour, milk, salt and a lot of black pepper. MMM. Good.

  • itdoesnotmatter

    Rutger Hauer in “Hitcher” is a prime example of beyond the pale [no pun intended] blonde, blue-eyed, Northern European villainy.

  • Ryan Blades

    Where would Singletons career be without whitey paying to view his racially biased trash.

  • Nathanwartooth

    Go to the original story and read some comments. It reads just like Amren! Good stuff.

  • Brian

    Audiences, though, can smell what’s real and what isn’t.

    That explains why ‘The Butler’ reeks of bull$%^…the film butler has his father murdered and his mother raped by the white devil; neither happened in reality.

  • Brian

    My mom and step-dad went to see BBM, without reading the reviews. They heard it was a love story and a cowboy movie, so something for both of them… heh!

  • Jenkem Huffington

    How come we’re not allowed to talk about the “minority” group that seems to be grossly over-represented in proportion in Washington, Wall St. and Hollywood?
    Makes me wonder if there’s SIX MILLION moderators here culling certain comments about certain statistical anomalies. “There is not a truth existing which I fear” indeed….

  • Brian

    The Legend of Bagger Vance was especially nauseating with its magic negro element, and in just about every other way. I saw it on a flight and wanted to jump from the plane.

    • OlderWoman

      George Lucas chose a black director for his film Red Tail. Apparently, the guy was unfit to direct it as Lucas had to reshoot the majority of it.

      • Brian

        To be fair though Lucas thought he had to re-work some of his own Star Wars trilogy also….

  • Brian

    Who told you that Eurocentric slander? Everyone knows that the ancient, totally black Egyptians invented movies 3000 years ago, and the white slave traders stole the idea and destroyed all the Egyptian theaters, leaving no trace.

  • capnmorgan5150

    “sagacious”

    Had to look that one up, lol!

  • MBlanc46

    I think you’re missing the storm clouds on the horizon.

  • CharlesFinley

    Broheim should use only African technology to make his films.

    Broheim should drive only African-made cars and fly in African-made jets with African pilots.

    Broheim and all his broheims should choose women like their wretched, greasy mothers as

    their “wives”.

    Broheim can get phuckt.

  • Junis

    “White movies have the obligatory Black actor of course playing the part of the sagacious one who solves all problems.” Morgan Freeman?

  • jane johnson

    My mistake. I did watch an episode of the Detroit version, and it seemed that, without the tv show, the owners would have a hard time turning a profit, considering their clientele

  • Bardon Kaldian

    Hahhah…OMG.

  • itdoesnotmatter

    Thanks, Blaak O. Will look into on IMDB.

  • Brian

    Really? Never saw it but I bet I must have heard someone mention it. Strange how things like this stick in your head years later and you don’t know where it comes from.

  • gemjunior

    Well Mr. Singleton, speaking of co-opting stuff, everyone probably remembers the Epic Beard Man, the older white man harassed on the bus by a black thug egged on by his black female friend, on and on continuously until he eventually snapped and taught manners to the thug. However, Hollywood presumably got an idea from it going viral and immediately made it into a movie but switched the races – a decent, quiet black man (who was by no means considering or committing a crime at the time) going about his business while a white thug harassed him. Reality inverted, just like it always is these days. The hero – the good guy, you see, must NOT be white in racial situations but must always be black. White = bad, black = good. That is the formula. Black can be replaced by any other group (Hispanic, Indian, Middle Eastern, etc.) than white, but white must always be bad.
    About 20 or so years ago I was in Europe and we saw a movie about Sami people – I never remembered the name of the movie but I did remember the substance enough for it to ring a bell when I saw the “modern” version. The movie was called “Pathfinder” and it was about a teenage Sami boy who must find safety for his tribe to make up for the trouble he has caused them all by unintentionally leading some unfriendly Viking marauder types right to the Sami camp where they laid waste to the men, women, children, elderly, etc. without hesitation. This itself was not dwelt on too much in the actual movie but historically they were viewed with suspicion and treated badly as second-class citizens because they rejected Christianity in favor of their old shamanistic religion which was pagan – and for that they were unfairly treated for centuries.
    Anyway, the modern version of “Pathfinder” is about evil Viking explorers known as “dragon men” who are “not men, but beasts” according to the white man left behind as a boy by the dragon men on their last bloodthirsty visit (left behind by his unloving savage of a father who directed him to slaughter an Indian infant; when he hesitated his father knocked him down saying ‘you are no son of mine’ and sailed off home, leaving his son to rot in a strange land, at age 11 or 12. These savage white people were incapable of even loving their own children it seems) and raised in peace by the kind, goodhearted, non-violent Indians. The child named “Ghost” eventually becomes a man and defeats the demon dragon men, and then spends all his time watching the coast for them. In the meantime he has married an Indian woman whose dead father was the last “Pathfinder” and they live happily ever after. This good white man has rejected his own people – instead of asking to return with them to where he belongs – he is much better than a regular white – in his heart he has evolved into a peaceful Indian who would have nothing to do with such evil people and rejects their violence in favor of the civility and peace of the loving, welcoming native Indians…
    So again we see that nobody in Hollywood is above stealing a story, making it anti-white and politically correct, and selling it to the stupid idiots who lap it up – mostly white.