Violent and Chaotic, Central African Republic Lurches Toward a Crisis

Adam Nossiter, New York Times, August 7, 2013

The two men lay still in the back of the pickup truck, staring up. Over them stood the uniformed rebels, rifles pointing out as the truck sped forward.

The rebels had just picked up two more citizens, caught reading fliers calling for a general strike, their friends said shortly after. Beaten as they were shoved into the truck, the men were unlikely to be heard from again, the friends feared. A similar seizure had occurred nearby the day before. Four had been shot dead and dozens wounded protesting another abduction less than a week before that.

The rebels, known as Seleka, or “alliance” in the Sango language, make the law in the Central African Republic, where coups and violent seizures of power have outnumbered fair elections four to one since independence.

Now, even their handpicked prime minister calls the country’s condition “catastrophic.” The rebels have held unchecked sway since they swarmed into this bedraggled capital in March, looting, abducting, raping and killing—even breaking into an orphanage to steal whatever they could, according to Amnesty International.

With its suffering largely cut off from the outside world, this landlocked former French colony, population 5.1 million, has catapulted into place as one of Africa’s most troubled countries. It has a rebel leader occupying its presidential palace, an ousted president who fled for his life into exile and a Constitution that protected residents’ rights minimally before being suspended.

Nowadays, the rebels cruise conspicuously in their Toyota Hilux pickups in the sparse traffic here, ragtag fighters from the lawless north, some of them Chadians, turbaned or wearing looted fatigues, guns bristling. Rifle-wielding boys as young as 12 have been spotted in the trucks. The men are accustomed to living in the bush, but in the capital there is not much left to steal. Many of the battered storefronts are shuttered or empty. The citizens keep their distance; everyone has an abduction story.

{Snip}

“It’s anarchy, a nonstate,” said the prime minister, Nicolas Tiangaye, a former human rights lawyer kept on by the rebel leadership as the emissary to an outside world that does not recognize it. “Looting, arson, rape, massacres of the civilian population—they are sowing terrorism,” he said, staring at the floor in his darkened office.

Local residents have accused Seleka rebels of killing 15 people last month because the minibus in which they were riding contained T-shirts supporting the deposed president; the bodies of seven, recovered from the Ubangi River, showed signs of torture. The International Federation for Human Rights, a French group that sent a delegation here, said the rebels had killed more than 400 people since they took power.

{snip}

The United States abandoned its embassy here months ago. “Now we are in a phantom state,” said a Western diplomat who has stayed on here. “It’s extremely dangerous. People are afraid for the future, and they are right.”

The crisis has been a long time in the making. Isolated in the middle of the continent, with few roads out or natural resources, the Central African Republic became independent in 1960 after a brutal six-decade colonial reign by France. But the former colonial power would continue to meddle in the cycles of coups, rebellions and violent transitions that have marked the country’s history ever since, though it is taking a back seat now. “Weariness” has overtaken Western officials faced with the turmoil, the diplomat here said.

The state had already nearly disappeared under the corrupt rule of Mr. Bozizé, who was president for 10 years before being chased out by the rebels. He had led a previous rebellion himself and is now in hiding, probably in the region, though even the government says that is not certain.

The rebels emerged from the barren, more-Muslim north, angered at the neglect of a region inaccessible from the capital for half of the year because of heavy rains and poor roads, accusing the president of reneging on an agreement to integrate some of their fighters into the army.

{snip}

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  • A black African country is on the verge of crisis and chaos?

    How can you tell?

    • Spartacus

      They probably stopped confirming they got the aid packages 🙂

      • Oh I get it. The dictator’s Swiss bank accounts are running low, so it’s time to lurch toward a crisis so that the gullible white do-gooders of the world will open their wallets.

        • White Mom in WDC

          ‘We are the world, we are the children,’ ….Live Aid 1985

          • Some Guy

            I remember watching that and thinking, “We can make a difference!” Then my eyes opened and realized, stop wasting time and money on a low IQ nation that can’t even help it’s self. I would like to see someone do at Ethiopia now and then. Nothing has changed, except the population more than like doubled.

          • Romulus

            If you’d like to have a laugh at their expense, check the film “The gods must be crazy”. Hysterical.

    • NeanderthalDNA

      Natural state of being.
      People with IQ’s of 13 year old white boys rule selves – Lord of Flies.

      • Or, more accurately, Birth of a Nation.

      • China_Rising

        And then you must correct for the much lower crime rates of 13 year old White males, and then you see that the Negro is actually far more incapable of civilization than previously thought.

      • Cannot Tell

        I think 13 year old white boys could do a better job of ruling nations than black Africans have done.

    • APaige

      (hand raised) I know…I know…the term African.

    • dukem1

      Because it’s tough to get people together due to the fact of the heavy rain that occurs.
      Everything there would be hunky-dory if not for the treacherous weather.

  • Spartacus

    “Local residents have accused Seleka rebels of killing 15 people last month…”

    ———————————————————————————————————————

    WOW ! That’s a lot less than in Detroit !

    • Strider73

      Or Chicongo.

  • GeneticsareDestiny

    “Rifle-wielding boys as young as 12 have been spotted in the trucks. The men are accustomed to living in the bush, but in the capital there is not much left to steal. Many of the battered storefronts are shuttered or empty. The citizens keep their distance; everyone has an abduction story.”

    Just another average day in a majority-black country.

    • Puggg

      Just another average day in Detroit.

  • NeanderthalDNA

    Lurches toward crisis, zombie-like, from previous crisis. Aw heck, just a big huge pathetic cascading crisis known as “black rule”. Let’s send more money!

    If not they might commence chopping limbs off their sprogs and assaulting us from afar with pictures of it. Ooooh! Ahhh. Stop pleeeaase! Here, take some money poor blackies. This is somehow my fault for blood diamonds or imperialism or something. Have sex with my daughter!

    Not another penny. Quarantine and study from afar like aliens watching Earth unseen…ha ha.

  • Nick Gherz

    The rebels had just picked up two more citizens,
    caught reading fliers calling for a general strike . . .


    ___________________________________

    At least their schools aren’t a total disaster!

    • George

      ‘Reading’ is a highly subjective word. I’m guessing the ‘flyer’ was loading with pictures and had minimal type.
      In Africa, owing to mass illiteracy, ballots often use the party/parties’ colours or symbols.

  • Creepy as crackers!

    “The Central African Republic became independent in 1960 after a brutal six-decade colonial reign by France.”
    I would bet that French Colonial rule was not nearly as brutal as the current state of affairs today.

    • Romulus

      Well, the article is in the J. York times. Nuff said.

  • Mahound

    France’s colonialism wasn’t brutal, it kept brutality at bay. But with the white man gone horror and brutality are back with a vengeance.

  • din_do_nuffins

    Violent and Chaotic, Central African Republic Lurches Toward a Crisis

    Translation: Vibrant and Enriching, Central African Republic Keeps It Real

    • JackKrak

      Dem Eurpean countries? Dey old school. Cetral Afican Republik, dey new school.

    • Erasmus

      I stay away from places labeled “culturally vibrant” Everyone with more than half a brain knows “culturally vibrant” means you don’t walk through the neighborhood at night, but if you must, be sure you’re packing heat.

  • David Ashton

    Millions of unhappy Africans need only apply for asylum…..

  • bigone4u

    Without whitey to organize an economy and keep blackie from killing blackie, the label “country” becomes meaningless. None of these places are countries in any traditional sense of the word. Whites can label maps and world globes with country names, but these are basically tribal warfare zones. I like my label “The Central African Warfare Zone.” A republic? Tell another joke, blacks.

  • Bantu_Education

    Since, according to the NY Slimes, French colonial rule was so brutal then they must be hankering for the good ‘ol days of Emperor Bokassa. It was either he or his comrade cannibal in Equatorial Guinea who used to play Mary Hopkins “Those were the days my friend” whilst doing some spring cleaning at the jail. At least he had a good sense of humour.

  • Sick of it

    At least someone finally backhandedly mentioned that the rebels are muslim.

  • IstvanIN

    How many times could they mention France?

  • Charles W.

    For anyone who wants to know how ‘glorious’ sub-Saharan Africa was before the evil White Man went and stole the magical curly-haired man’s juju, check out the unbelievable book of early travelers’ accounts called “The Negro in Negroland,” which can be found free online.

  • After cannibal emperor Bokassa, even chaos is an improvement.

  • Rhialto

    Note the NYT statement:

    “…1960 after a brutal six-decade colonial reign by France. But the former
    colonial power would continue to meddle in the cycles of coups,
    rebellions and violent transitions that have marked the country’s
    history ever since,…”

    This illustrates a rule of Liberal journalism: If Blacks commit evil acts, blame White men as much as possible.

    • Bantu_Education

      Exactly – they blamed whites for the Rwandan genocide, not once but twice. Firstly, white colonials supposedly laid the basis for the genocide by favouring the (somewhat better-looking and slightly more intelligent) Tutsi in the colonial administration. Secondly, whites were blamed for not intervening in the genocide. Of course the liberals never mention what happened to the small force of Belgian UN peacekeepers who foolishly surrendered to the Hutu rebels. They were castrated and skinned alive amongst other unspeakable things.

      “Half devil, half child” (Rudyard Kipling)

  • JackKrak

    If there’s a better template in journalism, I haven’t seen it –

    “Violent and Chaotic, (INSERT AFRICAN COUNTRY) Lurches Towards a Crisis”

  • White Mom in WDC

    Dude, this is news? When isn’t Africa or one its turd nations in crisis? Next article ….

  • Epiminondas

    “Weariness has overtaken Western officials faced with the turmoil…” It would be nice for whites if reality would also overtake them.

  • evilsandmich

    It’s anarchy, a nonstate

    The whole idea of the nation-state is just not a good fit for vast swaths of the globe.

  • Calling these folks “rebels” seems a bit dishonest. They’re really just armed criminal gangs.

  • freddy_hills

    A central African country descends into chaos & violence? It must be whitey’s fault.