Busting Out All Over: Black Mob Violence

Colin Flaherty, WND, April 12, 2013

Welcome to the new normal: Large-scale black mob violence is busting out in Philadelphia, Chicago, Utica, Jacksonville, St. Louis, Wilmington (Delaware), Greenville (South Carolina), Grand Rapids, Peoria, Springfield (Ohio), Newark, Boston and Brooklyn.

All in the last three weeks.

Police say they are baffled. Others say it is a regular meteorological event: “Large crowds and fights are not uncommon in the city in the warm weather,” said the ABC affiliate in Philadelphia.

The latest example of the new normal took place Tuesday in Philadelphia: 200 black people on the streets of the downtown financial district: fighting, vandalizing, rampaging, refusing to disperse, tossing bottles at police. It began at 4 p.m. and took police 90 minutes to restore order.

At the epicenter of the violence, an employee of Wendy’s said no one was surprised.

“It usually happens when the weather breaks,” Lakia Garrick told the local Fox affiliate. “They come in here and go crazy. It was really expected.”

Fourteen black people were arrested and charged with misdemeanors.

The riot came less than a month after the political and media establishment of Philadelphia rose up in outrage at an article in Philadelphia Magazine called “Being White in Philly.”

The article documented how racial violence was an every day fact of life in the City of Brotherly Love; and how most white people were afraid to talk about it because they were afraid of being called a racist.

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In St. Louis, 65 hours earlier, police responded to reports of a mob of 100 to 200 black people fighting and shooting guns at Leclede’s Landing, near the famous arch. Police refused to release an incident report on the violence, other than to say they thought it was a flash mob.

One man was shot. He was also the only one arrested after police found marijuana in his clothing at the hospital.

Kevin McBryan told KSDK TV news that racial violence in St. Louis is not hard to document: “I witnessed ‘flash mobs’ running thru VP fairs sucker punching white people on 3 different occasions.”

The VP Fair is an annual St. Louis celebration held in the same area commemorating the “Veiled Prophet.”

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A few hours earlier in Utica, N.Y., more than 100 black people were having a “riot.”

Officers described the scene as “very chaotic with numerous fights breaking out,” said the local NBC affiliate.

“Police say they were greatly outnumbered.” Six black people were arrested.

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In Greenville, S.C., a few days before that, a group of 20- 30 black people rampaged through downtown, assaulting, vandalizing and robbing in at least three separate incidents. One on video.

Just a few days before that, in Wilmington, Del., a mob of more than 100 black people were fighting in the streets. One person was shot, police described the action as a “large fight” and no one seemed alarmed or thought it was anything out of the ordinary.

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In Chicago, one week before that, 500 black people rampaged through the upscale shopping district known as the Magnificent Mile. They destroyed property, assaulted at least one police officer, sent one other person to the hospital with injuries.

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Chicago Alderman Emma Mitts told the Chicago Sun-Times that we are way past that:

“They’re taking over the streets. They’re taking over the restaurants,” Mitts told the Sun Times. Mitts said it’s not only happening in downtown but also in other Chicago neighborhoods. “They dance all over the street [and] in the restaurants, and they’re stopping traffic.”

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In the Boston area, two weeks before that, a group of 15 to 30 black people surrounded a bus at 1:15 a.m. and attacked the driver. “It is unclear what prompted the assault,” dutifully reported Metro.us.

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Post Script: And Wednesday of this week, two hours after this story was written, in Springfield, Ohio, 50 black people fought police with aluminum baseball bats at 4 p.m. Three people were arrested and charged with rioting.

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