Police Chief Blames ‘Pilgrims’, Cops for Chicago Violence

William Kelly, Washington Times, June 27, 2012

It’s official: With more than 240 dead, Chicago’s murder rate has surpassed the body count in war-torn Afghanistan. But as the city death toll continues to mount, outraged residents are asking questions and city officials are scrambling for answers—at least, the politically correct ones.

Answers that usually involve blaming dead white guys or ones that are still kicking.

But is politically correct silliness really what Chicago needs right now? Has the rhetoric of civil rights victimization from Rev. Jesse Jackson and Fr. Pfleger benefitted anyone in the black community?

Or do Chicagoans really need an unvarnished reality check from their public officials?

If it is the later, Chicago residents may have their work cut out for them.

Recently, Chicago Police Supt. Garry McCarthy joined black political leaders and community activists in a live radio forum, hosted by Clear Channel-owned WGCI-FM, to discuss Chicago’s violence epidemic and what—or who—is really to blame.

{snip}

When asked about the “gap” between law enforcement and the black community, McCarthy reached back 400 years for an answer.

“It’s a big issue. It’s a long time coming. We’ve done a lot of things wrong in policing in this country. I’m willing to admit that,” said McCarthy. “But this goes back 200-300 years to the time when Pilgrims came here and things developed from that, the African American experience in this country.”

But the Pilgrims weren’t the only people being blamed for the violence. The superintendent also laid blame at the feet of America’s finest and inferred—without actually stating it—that white police officers are the problem.

“Who has been the people enforcing those laws that were problematic for the African American community all these years? And that’s to me where it all starts,” stated McCarthy. “It starts with the recognition of how we got here and figuring out how we are going to move forward. By first confronting the issue. Recognition is the first step towards reconciliation. So that’s what I bring to the table. It’s one of those things that a lot of police chiefs in this country are afraid to talk about. I’m not afraid to talk about it because it’s out there and we’ve got to address it.”

Then WVON host Warren Valentine chimed in, blaming the Jim Crow era.

“It takes a village to raise a child and I’m not giving the parents a pass. But we can’t just say this is all on the parents and it ain’t all on nobody else. The legal system is the new Jim Crow system in America,” said Valentine. “You go on and look at what is going on in America today and compare it to when we look in the past. See a lot of people don’t understand the history of America.”

{snip}

By the end of the two-hour radio forum, it was the callers—not the “experts”—that plead for a return to family values. They weren’t blaming Jim Crow or Reconstruction. They weren’t engaging in the same politically correct gibberish.

Many more blamed parents and single-family households for the disintegration of personal responsibility.

V103 radio host Ramonski Luv called out to the live audience, “Parents, do you know where your children are?”

Well, Chicago, where are they?

Maybe the Pilgrims or the El Rukns would know.

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