Free Money From Obama’s Stash

Combs Spouts Off, October 8, 2009

Remember when they promised us the $780 billion in “stimulus” spending would produce jobs, funding shovel-ready projects that would get the economy moving? Not in Detroit. There, they just created a lottery for free money. Instead of creating jobs, they stimulated a chaotic mob scene, with fights and injuries and a near-riot. Welcome to Obama’s redistributionist America.

Via The Virginian, here are a couple of transcripts of WJR’s Ken Rogulski interviewing some free money lottery participants (emphasis added):

ROGULSKI: Why are you here?

WOMAN #1: To get some money.

ROGULSKI: What kind of money?

WOMAN #1: Obama money.

ROGULSKI: Where’s it coming from?

WOMAN #1: Obama.

ROGULSKI: And where did Obama get it?

WOMAN #1: I don’t know, his stash. I don’t know. (laughter) I don’t know where he got it from, but he givin’ it to us, to help us.

WOMAN #2: And we love him.

WOMAN #1: We love him. That’s why we voted for him!

WOMEN: (chanting) Obama! Obama! Obama! (laughing)

And the other one:

ROGULSKI: Did you get an application to fill out yet?

WOMAN: I sure did. And I filled it out, and I am waiting to see what the results are going to be.

ROGULSKI: Will you know today how much money you’re getting?

WOMAN: No, I won’t, but I’m waiting for a phone call.

ROGULSKI: Where’s the money coming from?

WOMAN: I believe it’s coming from the City of Detroit or the state.

ROGULSKI: Where did they get it from?

WOMAN: Some funds that was forgiven [sic] by Obama.

ROGULSKI: And where did Obama get the funds?

WOMAN: Obama getting the funds from . . . Ummm, I have no idea, to tell you the truth. He’s the president.

ROGULSKI: In downtown Detroit, Ken Rogulski, WJR News.

{snip}

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOZ-Etb0k0Q; 1 min., 29 sec.


Scuffles erupted as several thousand Detroit residents jockeyed, pushed and shoved Wednesday to get free money being offered to only 3,500 of the city’s recently or soon to be homeless.

Several received medical treatment for fainting or exhaustion while frantically trying to obtain the applications for federal housing assistance. The long lines and short tempers highlighted the frustration and desperation that Detroit residents feel struggling through an economic nightmare.

{snip}

Members of the Detroit Police Department’s Gang Squad and other tactical units were called in for crowd control. Several people reportedly passed out from exhaustion and had to be treated by emergency medical personnel. Some minor injuries were reported, and no arrests were made.

{snip}

Before Wednesday, Detroit Planning and Development workers already had spent two days handling long lines at City Hall and other locations. Rumors that $3,000 stimulus checks from the Obama administration spurred heavy turnouts.

{snip}

The city distributed more than 50,000 applications for the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing program over the past several days before running out Wednesday morning. Only 3,500 people who qualify will receive the money–a maximum $3,000 per applicant, Dumas said.

{snip}

To be considered, applicants must have lived in Detroit for the past six months, been homeless within the past year and be of low to moderate income. A single applicant is ineligible with an income of more than $24,850 annually; the maximum annual income for an eligible family of four is $35,500.

Individuals and families meeting the income criteria and facing eviction and foreclosure also are eligible. Being able to maintain housing after getting the assistance also is a condition of the program.

The program also provides money to keep utilities turned on.

The deadline to submit applications–originally Wednesday–has been extended a week because of the “enormous number” distributed, she added.

{snip}

[Editor’s Note: AR carried an earlier story on this hand-out program here.]

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfGLB8LO1aM; 4 min., 3 sec.

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