Protesters are gathering in support of Michael Brown in and around St. Louis as they nervously await what many believe will be an inevitable no-indictment vote in the coming days by a grand jury for the officer who shot him.

Demonstrators held a ‘die-in’ Sunday to mark 100 days since the unarmed Ferguson, Missouri teen was killed. They also convened to, among other things, prepare for the imminent court decision by issuing ‘rules of engagement’ for police there for crowd control, the New York Times reports.


Many of the the high-profile protesters met with President Obama and discussed the matter November 5, including Reverend Al Sharpton. It was a meeting the Gateway Pundit notes was not included on the president’s daily schedule.

Sharpton told the Times that Obama urged the group to ‘stay on course.’

‘[Mr. Obama] was concerned about Ferguson staying on course in terms of pursuing what it was that he knew we were advocating. He said he hopes that we’re doing all we can to keep peace.’

A crowd of a couple hundred demonstrators, angry about the fatal August shooting took to the streets of St. Louis on Sunday, briefly blocking a major intersection in protest.

Dozens of people lay down in the street outside of a downtown theater hosting a film festival, pretending to have been shot by other demonstrators playing the role of police officers in an action intended to evoke the memory of 18-year-old Brown, who died 100 days ago in front of his home in the suburb of Ferguson.


Marchers went on to briefly block a major intersection near Washington University and the event ended without any of the violence that was seen in Ferguson following Brown’s shooting death by police officer Darren Wilson.


‘We’ve decided not to wait for that decision. We’ve decided to get started,’ said Rockit Ali, a 22-year-old organizer of Sunday’s demonstration, who marched in a Spider-Man mask.

While Sunday’s event had been planned as a nonviolent action, Ali said that violence could not be ruled out if the grand jury finds Wilson without fault.

‘Rioting and looting are the tools of those without a voice. The rioting and looting, while I didn’t participate in it, was necessary. Without it we would not be standing here today,’ Ali said. ‘There is no revolution without violence.’


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