Cultural Amnesia on Sesame Street

Jane Weir, American Renaissance, September 29, 2014

Airbrushing the lefty roots of a cultural icon.

At Lincoln Center in New York City, the Library of Performing Arts has just mounted a fresh new retrospective exhibit on Sesame Street (“Somebody Come and Play: 45 Years of Sesame Street,” September 18, 2014–January 31, 2015). This once-controversial kiddie show is now older than most of the mothers who are crowding in with their toddlers and baby-strollers. I dropped in the other day and was hit with a blast of cultural amnesia.

The exhibit suggests that Sesame Street was always about Big Bird, fluffy puppets, and silly songs. It was never about urban slums, racial conflict, or any of those other “relevant” social themes of the late 60s that the newspapers always talked about when reviewing the program. Looking at this exhibit, you wouldn’t have a clue that when the first program was broadcast in November 1969, its “target child” was a “4-year-old inner-city black youngster” (according to the New York Times) or that the original opening sequence showed black children in a gritty playground, with Harlem “projects” towering behind.

Sesame Street‘s most striking early innovation was its “inner-city” studio set. Many people assumed it was meant to be Harlem. There were brick tenements with fire escapes, laundry hanging on clotheslines, garbage cans on the sidewalk; as well as an old brownstone inhabited by a black couple who wore afros. A kiddie show set in the “slums” (as the Times put it) seemed like a hip and edgy idea.

But hip, edgy ideas get old quickly. Within a year or two after the show’s launch, Sesame Street‘s producers began to rethink the “ghetto” idea. Gradually they gentrified the neighborhood, to the point where they now deny that they ever had Harlem in mind. Indeed, they now tell us that the Sesame Street set was inspired by the tony, picturesque blocks of Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Or so they claim in the exhibit brochure: “The brownstone building of 123 Sesame Street . . . was designed to look like the typical middle-income brownstone homes on Amsterdam and Columbus Avenue in the 1970s and 1980s.”

Not quite. The set was designed in the late 1960s, when the decaying blocks between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues could hardly be described as “middle-income.” Up to the 1980s, in fact, most of that neighborhood north of 72nd Street was “transitional” at best.

The exhibition assures us that Sesame Street was an extraordinary “cultural, educational, and media phenomenon,” but it shies away from telling us why. A 2007 New York Times retrospective was more frank: It warned that the characters in the first episodes live in “a dismal basement apartment,” and that the series is a “frightening glimpse” of the 1960s. The conclusion about early episodes? “Don’t bring the children.”

There were many reasons for Sesame Street to pull away from its early grittiness. In its first year, that look-and-feel seemed a little too aggressively left-liberal; radical, even. Some educational-television stations were hesitant to carry it. Famously, the state-supported PBS station in Jackson, Mississippi, briefly banned it. But a more significant reason for Sesame Street to mend its ways was the boom in kiddie television in the early ’70s. Such “educational” programs as Zoom (from Boston’s WGBH) and The Electric Company (from the producers of Sesame Street, for slightly older children) came on air. They were funny, innovative, and highly popular; they weren’t set in a slum, freighted with ideological agenda, or obviously aimed at inner-city non-white children.

One amusing aspect of Sesame Street’s revisionist history is that it makes its first Muppet superstar a non-person. That’s right, Kermit the Frog–crooner of that 1970 hymn to racial self-acceptance, “It’s Not Easy Being Green”–has gone down the memory hole. You will find no photos of Kermit in the Lincoln Center exhibit. No mention of him in the brochure. Now, it’s true that Kermit departed Sesame Street after the first year, and that he had a rich and rewarding career afterwards. But surely there’s no need to excise him entirely?

The exhibit suggests that Sesame Street was the first popular “educational” program aimed at pre-schoolers. Of course, it wasn’t. The ’50s and ’60s had Ding Dong SchoolCaptain KangarooMisterogers, and others. They were tremendously popular, wholesome, and entertaining.

The trouble was that poor black children didn’t watch Captain Kangaroo. And in the era of Head Start, Vista, and The Inner City Mother Goose, this was imagined to be one of the key reasons why they didn’t do well in school. From the very beginning, therefore, a primary objective of Sesame Street founders Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett was to come up with something that a black four-year-old welfare kid in Bedford-Stuyvesant would watch.

This is the essential fact about the origin of Sesame Street, but the curators of this exhibit won’t talk about it. I don’t think it’s hard to understand why. It would be an admission that Sesame Street, like all the other black uplift efforts of the 1960s, was an utter failure.

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Jane Weir
Jane Weir is a former journalist and current (unpublished) novelist now living in New York City. She has been published in Punch, The Spectator, Food & Wine, and San Diego Home-Garden Lifestyles.
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  • JackKrak

    Thank you, than you for this. For years I’ve wondered if anyone has noticed that SS does everything except have a North Korea-style intro to the show, with patriotic march music over a close-up of a hammer and sickle flag. I have a little girl and I will watch anything – a.n.y.t.h.i.n.g. – with her on Youtube to avoid another episode of SS where the black host and the mulatto minor character introduce some ghetto soul sista muppet and talk about how her hair is beautiful too or how some kids are sad because their daddies are “incarcerated” (word of the day!). These days, no SS sketch is complete without a gratuitous shot of a frizzy-haired halfrican nodding his head up and down to the beat of some (c)rap song about how reading is cool or how you learn multiplication tables while “raising the roof”.

    I remember when I was a kid I used to watch the same episode twice every day, but this was back when we had four channels and before PBS was staffed and run by diversitards.

    • notyranny

      Homeschooling is the only way to protect your children

      • jayvbellis

        It’s a start. But, we need to build on success. The best home schooling moms should move on to teach private schools. The last group to make a mission out of establishing effective private schools for endangered White children was the Catholic Church from 1900-1965

        The American Catholic Church ain’t doing it for White children anymore, someone else needs to step up.

        • newscomments70

          You’re not kidding. Catholic Schools embrace liberalism and diversity. Catholic schools are switching to common core. They are aggressively recruiting blacks and other non-whites. Minorities are allowed to attend for free, including upper middle class Indians. The blacks are let in under the guise of “sports scholarships” or whatever. The whites have to pay $15,000 or more for tution. You pay all that money and you still have to deal with the low lifes.

          • Raymond Kidwell

            Also interesting the Amish are adopting all kinds of people from outside their group and diverse backgrounds

    • Zimriel

      RTA. ‘PBS was staffed and run by’ the diversity crew from the start of Sesame Street.

      Although, in 1979-81, when I was watching the show, there was I think a lull when they weren’t driving PC as their primary mission.

      • The Worlds Scapegoat

        I watched the show in the early 70’s. I probably watched it when it first came out in the late 1960’s. From the very start I hated that show except for the Muppets. At that time it seemed very communistic. It was like they were trying to make poverty stricken Harlem or other black slums look cool.

        If you look at the two creators of the show, Joan Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett, you can begin to understand why it is communistic.

        “Cooney = …She attended North High School
        in Phoenix, where she was active in school plays. She stated that her
        biggest influence as a teenager was her teacher Bud Brown, whose
        lectures about the Civil Rights movement, poverty, the free press, and anti-semitism in Europe “absolutely inflamed” her and changed her life. Brown was later investigated as a Communist.”

        .

    • They sure love promoting themselves some “diversity”. This is the commercial I see approximately 15k times a day as my kid watches Curious George: https://www.youtube[dot]com/watch?v=uxipJKI1Gv8

      • The Worlds Scapegoat

        In one of those pictures it looks like two black guys (gays) with a halfrican girl.

    • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

      Sesame Street has always been Negrophilic garbage. I have good memories of watching Captain Kangaroo and Mister Rogers as a kid.

      • Alexandra1973

        I also watched Mr. Dressup, a Canadian show. In the Detroit area you could pick up Canadian stations; back in the 70s and 80s it was Channel 9.

        • Ron Cheaters

          Mr. Dressup alays had something going on. the first 15 minutes were always good. then the imagination crap was too much. when he’d go for the tickle trunk I knew it was time for lunch.

          • newscomments70

            That actually sounds kind of creepy.

        • Seminumerical

          Other way around. In the sixties We’d watch Mr Dressup and the Friendly Giant in Canada and then catch Captain Kangaroo from Vermont. It was a weak signal with terrible static. to this day I am not entirely sure what the Captain looked like.

      • LexiconD1

        The Electric Company was one of my favorites.

    • Lagerstrom

      I banned SS a long time ago.

    • woog

      And then there’s Tickle Me Elmo who… well, never mind.

    • Raymond Kidwell

      That sounds like a pretty funny show. Are you sure this isn’t comedy?

  • D.B. Cooper

    My peak SS years were 1976 and 1977, but I didn’t pick up on anything social about it. I would actually sit through the entire hour of Electric Company hoping the Spider-Man segment would come on.

    • Easyrhino

      Be careful, the crazies at the $PLC might extrapolate your statement to mean you’re a former member of the Schutzstaffel.

    • Rurik

      I was a month into my Viet Nam year when this Sesame Sh!t began. I learned about it only later after I returned. Judging by the enthusiasm for a “kiddie show” of all my stoner acquaintances’, I figured out from the beginning what it was and have made serious efforts to avoid any exposure or acknowledgment of it, to this day. See… Going to Viet Nam was good for something. 🙂

    • Ron Cheaters

      I watched SS for Super Grover and Bert & Ernie. the rest was dreadfully boring and repetative. 123-45-678910-11tweellve.

  • revilo evola

    If the bird showed up in the original hood today, it would be raped and robbed. Or worse, plucked alive and made into fried chicken. I’m surprised that PBS hasn’t resurrected Mr. Rogers as an “Asian” Muslim. But that might be something the BBC could better look into.

    • Though I understand that Harlem is being gentrified like there’s no tomorrow.

      • cherrie greenbaum123

        troo, dat! Gnome sane?

      • E_Pluribus_Pluribus

        No surprise. To make room for all the ‘diversity’ being moved out of Harlem, Westchester County has been under heavy assault from HUD. Here’s the Westchester county executive in the WSJ last year:

        “HUD has told Westchester that any limits on the size, type, height and density of buildings are ‘restrictive practices.’ It demands that the county sue its localities over such common zoning regulations, which are not exclusionary by any stretch of the imagination. If HUD can define what constitutes exclusionary practices, then local zoning as it is known today disappears. Apartments, high rises or whatever else the federal government or a developer wants can be built on any block in America.”

        Democrats are going after suburban GOP-leaning strongholds big time.

        • newscomments70

          I live in a complex that has some Section 8. It has given me a sense of humor.

    • newscomments70

      Season 1, episode 1 in 1969 actually showed little black kids in Harlem for the opening credits. They through in a couple of white kids in the last few seconds to make it look less obvious. I hope they gave them security guards. The new gentrified Harlem would actually be safer.

        • newscomments70

          I just saw that. It’s kind of horrifying that many of us loved this show.

          • bilderbuster

            That show gave me the creeps when I was a kid.
            It looked filthy and to this day I still can’t stand Big Bird and those stupid Muppets.

          • newscomments70

            The “Electric Company” gave me nightmares. I just didn’t get into it; and the funk and psychedelic sounds were just too bizzare for a child.

          • The Worlds Scapegoat

            All that was created by jewish communists and blacks. You should have been repulsed by it.

            .

          • newscomments70

            Well Morgan Freeman was part of it.

          • kikz2

            the muppet show in the 80’s was great 🙂

          • Alexandra1973

            Swedish chef FTW! Loved that guy!

          • The Worlds Scapegoat

            Beaker and Muppet labs

          • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

            Same here! Never connected Kermie being green with blackness as a youth. Kermit the frog was passed off as this gentle soul who loved his Ms. Piggy. If Jim Henson thought Negroes are anything like Kermit, he hadn’t been around many Negroes. Henson must have been from Vermont!!

          • kikz2

            i was too old for it other than the puppets were waaay cool…….. i was a captain kangaroo kid 🙂 i remb, i was in college when they finally took him off the air.. i cried. i still miss his silliness 🙂 and i hate my kids didn’t get to grow up w/the captain…..

          • newscomments70

            There are probably recordings of Cpt Kangaroo on youtube. You can show your kids normal TV via the internet.

          • Remember Clarabell the clown on Howdy Doody? The same guy was also Captain Kangaroo.

          • kikz2

            that’s right.. keeshan was clarabell… 🙂 doody however was just before my time… 🙂

          • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

            Same here. Captain Kangaroo was my favorite show. I remember adjusting the rabbit ears on Mom and Dad’s TV to better tune in this show. My Grandma, who had voted for George Wallace and was a strong segregationist, felt Sesame Street was for Darkies, and forbade me from watching a show that glorified Darkies.

          • newscomments70

            I remember being about 3 years old, waiting for Captain Kangaroo to start. i would sit in front of the black and white television with the rabbit ears and static/snow, patiently waiting. The news was on first…that boring adult with the horned-rimmed glasses kept saying, “it’s five minutes past the hour, it’s ten minutes past the hour, etc”…and finally.

        • antiquesunlight

          Yuck. I never realized Sesame Street pushed diversity so hard. But I always thought that stupid song was the most grating, depressing junk I’d ever heard. I HATED Sesame Street when I was a kid. It made me want to claw my eyes out. I loved Mr. Rogers, though, and still do. He was so sincere and interesting.

          • kikz2

            too old for that as well.. i couldn’t stand the puppets, but there was something about mr rogers.. he was wonderful..i guess his zen quality, an adult who had time… for you…………….. but… mr. mcFEELY wasjust beyond creepy. (shudders)

          • antiquesunlight

            ha ha yeah, Mr. McFeely was weird and some of the castle puppets freaked me out. I mainly liked the songs and the parts where he’d sit around and talk about things. Mr. Rogers was an excellent musician in real life and it came through in the show. That piano was pretty wild.

      • Alexandra1973

        Much as I like hearing Pastor Manning, he complains about Harlem being gentrified. Doublespeak/doublethink.

    • cherrie greenbaum123

      You owe me one keyboard, buddy! 😀

    • They’d make Big Bird fight Oscar the Grouch to the death before they plucked and fried him. Michael Vick would hold the bet money.

      • antiquesunlight

        I’ve got 200 on Oscar by KO late in the third. He looks pretty tough.

    • propagandaoftruth

      Most of what I see on Disney an Nick TV is the modern direct descendent of this.

      With corporate dreck thrown in for extra vomitsome appeal.

  • According to my mother, I never liked watching Sesame Street, even the version that, by the time I was old enough to watch TV, was non-ghetto. She tells me I was big into Electric Company and 3-2-1 Contact and Square One, though the latter show was short lived and came along later in my childhood.

    Today’s Sesame Street can have of all people Sonia Sotomayor on as a guest. Maybe she was scouting the Cookie Monster as a new law clerk to help her write a decision that would let Bert and Ernie get “married.”

    • kikz2

      none of those held my attention….. however.. Johnny Quest.. now there was a show for a kid! Komoto dragons, evil Asian villians, yetti’s, mummies, spider robots.. 🙂 i remb, Race even kissed some femme fatale once.

      • newscomments70

        I think he had a Muslim friend.

        • kikz2

          no, hadji was hindu.

          • newscomments70

            Oh ok, I recall now. They all look the same too me…actually those two groups want to kill each other though. So much for diversity.

        • Garrett Brown

          Lol Hadji the Muslim.

      • Lagerstrom

        Yeah, I liked that one!

      • Tim

        Her name was Jade and she was quite the Kowloon B-girl…

    • Lagerstrom

      I saw ‘Ice (mf’n’) T’ on it one day (during the course of a rare ‘channel flick’) demonstrating for the littlies some rhyming words. Must have nearly killed him to avoid muttering ‘m-f-er’ and ‘@ss’ for a solid minute.

    • silviosilver

      The opening sequence I remember (or think I do) had a couple of black girls playing double dutch. Never liked the show much myself.

  • newscomments70

    I was a demographic for this show in 1975 or so. The racial propaganda and social agendas were there, but they were less radical and aggressive. I ate it up. The liberal media hooked my young mind. I eventually graduated to such shows as “Good Times”. “Good Times” was probably my favorite childhood show. Bring the funk out, I loved it. Liberal media indoctrinated me successfully. They did an amazing job, no exaggeration. I was theirs until about age 26. After that, I somehow ended up on AMREN supporting race realism. How did that happen?

    • Kenner

      It all starts when you notice things…

    • Though as far as black shows went, Good Times was not that bad. John Amos’s character was the strict disciplinarian. Though we know it was TV, not reality.

      • newscomments70

        It can happen, probably more back then. The few black males I know who are somewhat civilized had such a father. John Amos seems pretty anti-white though.

      • John R

        Funny, if that same show was put on the air today, it would probably be criticized for it’s “insensitive” portrayal of “African Americans” as “poor, living in ghettos and belonging to gangs, and being lazy (The JJ character.).”

        • newscomments70

          I believe it was criticized for perpetuating stereotypes. You have to love the “stupid white people” scenes.

          • bilderbuster

            The Jefferson’s White neighbors won that stupidity contest.

          • newscomments70

            Even though that was a form of anti-white propaganda, I still liked them: Archie Bunker, Mr. Bentley, and Tom. Tom was even used the N-word once. He said something like, “Stop calling me ‘honky’. How would you like it if I called you ‘(n-word)’?” The scene is on youtube, it’s not something you see these days. Mr. Bentley was a stereotypical English liberal. He deserved the abuse from George. English liberals really are stupid. Anyhow, I still like the “Jeffersons”.

        • Rurik

          It would have characters with names like Lashonda, Chlamydia, Ja’Nator, Jameel, and Sy’Phillis.

          • mobilebay

            Don’t forget La’civious.

        • silviosilver

          The Fat Albert cartoon had some intensely dumb, virtually illiterate black characters in it, if I recall.

      • bilderbuster

        I hated that show too.
        John Amos and Andy was always looking for a job and blaming someone or something for their crappy life and Michael with his fro and Black Power BS.
        I could barely watch TV without Norman Lear’s propaganda slimeing our family’s living room during the 70’s.

        • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

          Exactly. My Grandma detested All In The Family. She pointed out that not liking Blacks reflected common sense, and that Archie’s anti-White hatred of Irish, Italians, Poles was stupid. My Grandma was also old enough to be Archie’s Mom, and had a different outlook on life from his generation. She was German descent herself, always detested native born Whites who had ethnic hatreds of European Immigrants. Her idea of a good show would have been an upstanding, intelligent working class main character, with parents born in Europe. Friends of several White nationalities, neighborhood fine until Negroes started moving in and making trouble for everyone.

          • bilderbuster

            Grandma had the right idea for a great show.
            It would’ve been funny to watch them always finding out what those loopy Blacks were up to next to on each episode and how the Whites dealt with them in a very un-PC way.

          • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

            Her neighborhood had been ruined by Blacks in the late sixties, She and Grandpa had moved out along with many dear friends and neighbors when the Blacks came. She always told how, before the Blacks came, everyone got along nicely. There was so little crime that most residents left their keys in their cars in the driveway, and would sleep with the front door unlocked. The neighborhood was also all White. German, Italian, Polish, Slovak were the big nationalities. The Blacks destroyed the neighborhood. They brought violence and noise, and the older people moved out.

          • bilderbuster

            That’s happened to so many nice, clean neighborhoods and cities in America.
            Ferguson was 100% White in 1970.
            What’s so frustrating is that this could be stopped immediately and could be completely reversed in less time than it took us to go to the moon if we are determined enough.

          • Alexandra1973

            That’s one thing that rubbed me the wrong way. I’m half Polish (and I do have German ancestry), and there’s nothing wrong with us Pollacks.

            Your grandmother had some sense. She’s the kind of person Tim Wise fears.

          • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

            She was an awesome lady. She’s been gone almost 20 years now, but I still miss her. The Libtard thought police types would not know what to do with an elderly female segregationist, that is for sure. She was honest about people, and was not afraid to give her opinion. I remember seeing Don Rickles flattering Negroes on that one comedy with Dean Martin once. She told me that there are Jewish People, and there are K$kes, and that Rickles was the latter, that She wished Deano would have told Rickles off right there on TV.

          • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

            Definitely nothing wrong with being Polish. My wife is mostly Polish descent. Hard workers, stoic, excellent cooks. Polish immigrants were mostly very poor money wise upon coming to America, but worked hard, obeyed the law, loved their families and loved Jesus. Hamtramck, MI was quite the Polish community years ago, a very nice community from what I have read. Drove through there about 10 years ago, it appears to be mostly Negro/Islamic now.

          • Alexandra1973

            Yeah, Hamtramck was once a Polish enclave, now it’s all Muslim. That’s what my mother told me. She still lives in the suburbs.

          • The Worlds Scapegoat

            I hated All in the Family; especially Archie and his nasal whining wife. Meathead was a stupid commie. I only like Gloria, and that was because she was a young blond girl. After she started doing those African commercials, I stopped liking her also.

            .

      • kikz2

        sanford & son………

        • bilderbuster

          Of all of those types of shows Sanford & Son was closer to the truth.

          • Steven Bannister

            What I liked about the character of Fred Sanford is that he was just a SIMPLE OLD BLACK MAN and the writers didn’t try to make him into a genius or a superhero or an oppressed victim. He was who he was.

          • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

            Exactly. No magic Negro bull crap. Just a true to life depiction of the typical older Black man. Rather stupid, rather mean spirited, thinking he was much smarter than he actually was. Always trying to scheme, but everything always crashed and burned. Today, Fred Sanford would be a prescription pain meds dealer with marijuana growing in the back yard.

        • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

          Used to enjoy this show as well. A realistic portrayal of Negroes, with all of their constant scheming and degeneracy. Red Foxx was hilarious?? He depicted the typical older Negro from back then perfectly.

          • bilderbuster

            Ugly Aunt Ester and drunken Uncle Woodrow.
            “Fred Sanford! You old Heathen!”
            “Shut up you old fish eyed fool!”

          • kikz2

            it was a redux of an english show.. steptoe and son..

    • John R

      How? The rise of the Internet, that’s how. No longer do we have to depend on pre-packaged messages being fed to us by major corporations. We can explore what is REALLY going on and come up with our own conclusions.

      • bilderbuster

        Race mixing and non-Whites are vastly over represented in online advertising and make TV commercials look pale in comparison. (pun intended)

        • antiquesunlight

          I haven’t noticed that Internet ads are unusually pro-mixing, but I wouldn’t be surprised if you’re right. I have noticed that they use a ton of non-white actors. But as far as TV goes, do you remember this commercial from a few years ago? It makes me sick. youtube dot com/watch?v=tjbII5xqG8s

          • Garrett Brown

            Watch Youtube without ad block for a day. This past week they’ve been advertising an oil driller and his wife that teach us dumb whiteys how to take care of your home.

          • Alexandra1973

            Swiffer commercials?

          • Garrett Brown

            My ugly black wife knows everything commercials.

          • Alexandra1973

            I had a free trial for Amazon Prime videos. Showed a white guy with a black woman on the welcome screen.

          • Garrett Brown

            At least you know they’re being well fed. Too bad the guy has STDs.

      • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

        Exactly. We can turn to AmRen to get the truth, and read opinions from a racial realist slant.

    • CallahanAuto

      I think 1970s-era Sesame Street was entertaining, despite its lean to the left, and Joe Raposo gets most of the credit for that. He was a brilliant kids’ songwriter, and his songs were not driven by a political agenda, with the possible exception of “It’s Not Easy Being Green.” There’s no subversive agenda for “I’m an Aardvark.” His departure was a hole in the show that could not be replaced.

      I liked the black muppet, Roosevelt Franklin. He spoke in rhymes and was rambunctious in class. Not very politically correct! No wonder he was eliminated.

      “Good Times” was pretty funny, plus it seemed to be a show true to black culture, with some sugarcoating perhaps. But it didn’t appear to be an anti-white show. I used to watch “What’s Happening!”

      • newscomments70

        hi hi hi hi. those shows were awful, but I have nostalgia for them.

  • TruthBeTold

    Mrs. Weir.

    Great piece of work. I didn’t know about the exhibit and would never have know this white wash(?) was going on.

    I don’t know how this relates to minorities but the first SS controversy I remember hearing about was the complaint that they were flashing numbers and letters and it was blamed on decreasing kids attention span and causing hyper-activity.

    I suspect the change may have been made because of race.

    It’s likely blacks kids weren’t learning the lessons but simply being black and their natural black behavior was erroneously linked to flashing images.

    So SS was blamed for decreasing the attention span of blacks and the fast flashing segments were removed.

    Did it work to help black kids learn?

    No.

    • Rurik

      But hit helped turn White kids Black.

  • Uncle Bob

    I’m amazed to see how many people spent their youth being educated by the junk-pile puppets in the hood on Sesame Street or around Bill Cosby’s landfill. They must have been literally trying to fill kid’s heads with garbage at a young age!

    • newscomments70

      They did teach us some basic reading and math. They even taught us to count in Spanish (hurrah!). I’m not sure how the minority children reacted to those lessons, but it was a good head start for us beginning school. i.e. memorizing the alphabet in some ridiculous, monontonous song actually works with four year olds. The characters were mostly likable, but it taught white children the false and dangerous lesson: third world minorities are safe to interact with. “They are just like us.” That is obviously untrue in most cases. I’m sure many whites were raped and killed because of this illusion.

      • John R

        Yes, it was an educational show. But, then again, I am sure even the North Koreans want their kids to do well in school. It was the propaganda that went along with it that was bad, and dangerous.

        • newscomments70

          Very true, and it’s much worse now. i recently saw a video. I believe it was released by Apple. The video was “why everyone should learn computer programming”. I thought it was something advanced, but it was a sesame street level video for kids. All of the kids were non-white, mostly black and hispanic. There was not one white child in the video. The message was, “we are the future” etc.

      • bilderbuster

        My mother taught me that stuff and today that’s called “White Privilege”.

      • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

        Never bought into the Negroes being harmless propaganda as a child. I could see how scary their neighborhoods were, and was warned about their penchant for violence and bullying by Parents/Grandparents.

    • Alexandra1973

      I grew up on Sesame Street, Electric Company, Fat Albert, and the like.

      Thankfully the garbage has long since been taken out over here. 😉

    • TruthBeTold

      Do any of the people posting comments seem to be brainwashed by Sesame Street?

      It seems like a few people who did watch it end up being race-realists.

      Smart people (even young kids) quickly learn that the fantasy they see on TV and in the movies isn’t what they actually experience.

    • Fat Albert at least had a useful moral message in each show, like not using drugs, and so-on. The last time I was in the county jail (11 days), a kid about 18 or 19 was with me at intake. He had been smoking black tar heroin and was a complete wreck. At my release, he was just bonding out after 11 days cold-turkey in detox, and was still a complete wreck. If they’re going to put any children’s/youth programming at all on TV, more messages about not using drugs would be a good place to start.

      • Garrett Brown

        HEY HEY HEY! Wanna know how to catch yo momma’s boyfriend with a bear trap?!!!

      • Alexandra1973

        Not that black kids would listen, though.

  • LHathaway

    Excellent, excellent article. Thank you Jane Weir.

  • John R

    Interesting article. So, in reality, Sesame Street was just another example of the Left looking for a way to improve black success. That was fifty years ago almost. When will these people just acknowledge the obvious? The races just are not equal.

  • Tim_in_Indiana

    Wow, a lot of things about Sesame Street make sense after reading this that I never thought of before…the effort to fill in where the schools were failing, the gritty “inner city” set, Oscar, who lived in a trash can, Kermit’s singing of “It isn’t Easy Being Green” and, of course, the heavy depiction of the idyllic, perfectly “diverse” neighborhood (that never existed in real life.” All of this, of course, perfectly tied in with the “hippie sixties” time period in which it debuted.

  • MekongDelta69

    What black ‘uplift’ project wasn’t, isn’t and always will be an utter failure?

  • Truthseeker

    I loved Sesame Street when I was a kid. I still enjoy looking at old segments from it that bring back memories. Of course, this was in the 1980’s, before hyper-PC and after the gritty inner-city origins. There were enough Whites on the show that I didn’t feel like it was preaching to me about anything racial.

    Since growing up and becoming more racially aware, it’s been interesting to look back on some of the things I liked as a kid and notice all the subtle brainwashing attempts they contained. I’m glad there was no irreversible damage. It gives me hope that some of today’s youth will also be capable of snapping out of it when faced with reality.

    • silviosilver

      Punky Brewster was one of the first shows I noticed those subtle attempts when I decided to relive some childhood memories through youtube. Nothing particularly egregious, just obvious production decisions to slant things one way rather than another. There’s obviously a limit to how impactful this is because it clearly never prevented me from getting to the bottom of the story, and in fairly short order too.

  • je suis paganisme

    So it goes.
    In the late sixties, both karate and yoga were pretty radical. Some thought that they were the province of demonic entities.
    Now . . . karate is for kids, and yoga is a health practice.
    Much of the fear of the Left is just booga-booga nonsense. They are ghosts that flee before the dawn.

    • Zimriel

      I *still* think yoga is a foreign fad for Citizen Of The World yuppies.
      Karate, as a martial art, has merit. We learn from it. We take from it what we need; we leave the rest.

    • Garrett Brown

      Yoga is still booga-booga nonsense.

  • Simonetta

    I’m old enough to remember that my dad would always watch “Romper Room” with me, and saying that the blonde teacher was ‘really cute’.
    But he was always too busy to watch Capt. Kangaroo or Howdy Doody with us kids.

  • IstvanIN

    My brother and I were way too old for Sesame Street but my sister is 2 years young than SS. My mother put an end to her watching SS when lil sis started speaking Spanish. Glad I grew up with Captain Kangaroo, Romper Room, Gene London and of course, the original Flintstones.

    • Alexandra1973

      I remember Romper Room. Just today my 12-year-old was asking me about the Flintstones. I told him watch it on YouTube.

      • IstvanIN

        The Flintstones are great, especially the technology.

        • John

          Yabba, dabba dooooo…….

    • newscomments70

      Spanish is actually a European language. There are even white nationalist chapters and websites for Spanish speakers. Furthermore, it is widely used in the business world. It is not useless. One can make a better living knowing the language. I don’t blame you not wanting it pushed on you as a racial agenda though.

      • IstvanIN

        America is an English speaking nation. I resent Spanish as the language of the invaders.

        • newscomments70

          I hear you, but I enjoy speaking it while at work in Madrid and Buenos Aires. I’ve actually made some good money doing that. Furthermore, we have immigrants from Africa whose first language is English…over a million actually. You could resent English for the same reason. Europe is Europe. There is even a “stormfront en español”

          • IstvanIN

            I am sick of press one for English, press two for Spanish. I watched the entire installation of King Philip II and have a great respect for the Spanish people. The Latin American sucm who are invading the US, not so much. As for Africans whose first language is English, don’t want them either. And their first language isn’t English, but usually some tribal thing, English is just their official language.

          • newscomments70

            “I am sick of press one for English, press two for Spanish.” I am, too. As I said, I like it in Buenos Aires and Madrid…not Boston.

          • Garrett Brown

            Proper Spanish, royal Spanish, REAL Spanish.

  • We’re too far from Pueblo to get decent TV reception from there, and too close to Monument Hill to receive well from Denver. We also don’t have cable, so this means my daughter doesn’t get much exposure to the bilge on TV. Ours is only for watching movies on DVD. I did get her the complete Wallace & Gromit collection this summer, but heck, I’m a big claymation fan, too.

    The South African version of Sesame Street includes a muppet with AIDS. Since muppets don’t have genitalia, I imagine this means the critter caught it by shooting up heroin. Quite a trendy, hip message, that.

    • Rurik

      Or perhaps somebody fisting it up its muppety backside.

      • Zimriel

        In Africa? More likely a carrier did the muppet in order to be pure and clean again.

    • Zimriel

      Some people got it from transfusions, especially during the early-mid-1980s. Isaac Asimov was one of them.

    • PvtCharlieSlate

      If you haven’t already, buy for your daughter a complete set of the “Chronicles of Narnia” by C.S. Lewis.

      • jayvbellis

        Narnia is very boring.

        Nothing even remotely close to the excitement of The Lord of the Rings.

    • LHathaway

      I hear Hulu Plus and NetFlicks, over the internet, allow you television access of some kind, so you too your mind sucked out.

  • kikz2

    wasn’t Elmo’s black “handler” found out to be a pedo? i f*ckin hated Elmo by the way…. that third person high pitched whine…. i really didn’t let my kids watch ss too much.. but, i hated the insipid Barney even more.. that crap was not allowed on in my home……

  • Barney was actually worse than Sesame St., due to the total lack of attention given to negative events and feelings. It was 100% up-beat, which does absolutely nothing to help kids deal with reality.

    • TruthBeTold

      What I don’t like seeing with children today is how kids are surrounded by primary colors and hand-drawn letters that are often backwards.

      You want to raise childrens’ consciousness not lower it to the youngest common denominator.

      If you set your young children to see their childhood as different from adults especially based on bright, primary colors, I believe it confuses a child.

      This may be what causes problems with ‘tweens’. They were brought up on stereotypes of young children then they have to make a now artificial transition to adulthood.

      • Usually Much Calmer

        Ah, but when the white kids are stultified by bad pedagogy. . . we ARE all equal.

        That’s why I appreciate that AmRen runs stories about cuts to gifted and talented education.

  • Saggin Gin

    Why anyone would waste time, effort, & money trying to teach a negro anything is beyond logic. Same outcome as trying to teach basic arithmetic to a worm. But hey, someones is getting paid to go through the motions.

  • Reverend Bacon

    Yet another lost battle in LBJ’s “Other Vietnam War.” Except this one: was completely unwinnable; has gone on for 50 years; and has cost about 100 times the $trillion or so Vietnam cost in today’s money.

  • Very well done. More Jane Weir in the future, please.

  • Lord Sandwich

    Gilligan’s Island was my idea of diversity as a kid. White people from all walks of life stranded on an island. They don’t know how lucky they were to never be rescued.

    • Ringo Lennon

      Yeah, Sammich, That’s the kind of diversity I like. Hahaha. What about Ginger and Maryann? Mmmm. Mmmm. Both were table grade.

      • Lord Sandwich

        Indeed. High IQ talented beautiful children at that.

      • My favorite TV actress from that era was Barbara Eden in “I Dream of Genie”. A choice between her or Yoko Shimada – “Mariko” – would have been rather difficult for me.

  • Garrett Brown

    I love when older women who have lived through these past decades shut down all the propaganda and revisionist BS. Why would anyone let their beautiful white children watch Sesame Street in the first place? Ever?

  • Garrett Brown

    Yes, absolute garbage.

  • Garrett Brown

    I and my sisters were Mr. Rogers kids. F*** diversity, I liked puppets.

  • From what I’ve seen EVERY kids’ show in America is now a vehicle for leftism and negrophilia/negromania. Apparently SS was the pioneer in this.

    • Melvin Bonzarelli

      Studies have repeatedly shown that black children and lower class white children being raised by single mothers or by grandmothers watch considerably more television than white children and children being raised in traditional, intact families. So the medium of tv is the way to reach and indoctrinate the next generation of Gentle Giants.

  • OHDeutscheKlezmerRebel

    West Side Story was realism. Violent Hispanics, a White cop with a good German last name trying to instill some sense of decorum and respect.

  • TruthBeTold

    If I had seen that as a kid I would have seen it as creepy.

    For some reason, I’m picking up a transsexual vibe.

  • I used to watch Sesame Street as a youngster in the early to mid 80s. I haven’t given it a second thought since…..so it was a bit of a surprise to read the article about what was really going on. Well, I say a surprise, but of course I should not be surprised given what I know about our situation.

    Obviously as a child, I took none of this as being an agenda – but in hindsight now, it most clearly was – and provably so.

    If I told my immediate (non-political non racially aware) friends that Sesame Street was a left-wing multiracial propaganda outlet they would think I was insane and “reading too much into things”….but here it is, a reality non the less.

    This is how dominant “left-wing” culture has been upon western nations, where it becomes part and parcel of life itself.

    There was another old show I used to watch as a kid in the 80s, forgotten the name, where there is an angel (highway to heaven?) that helps people in need or to get their lives back on track. I caught a show on ITV4 here in Britain, which shows a lot of old programs like that.

    The episode I saw was dealing with ‘white supremacists’ as it happens (!)…. complete with the most comedic (now) stereotypes. Now that I am aware of what the situations actually are, the messages of the program were not so gently massaged into the program – but more laid on with a trowel very thickly.

    At the time I would have just ‘taken it all in’ as being realistic and that the program was morally right. It just goes to show how so many TV shows have been chipping away with propaganda and agendas for years, hardly noticeable to the everyday viewers who are not ‘switched on’ and really looking into things.

    • Tim

      I remember that very episode . The mother at the end becomes enraged at her husband for turning her son into a racist also. She shrieks at the end how she won`t go thru all the hate again with her child that she did her husband. I too, thought it was powerful stuff at the time…

      • After watching that episode fairly recently, I looked up Michael Landon on wikipedia. His “early life” and family connections started to explain the episode (in a Kevin McDonald kind of way).

  • Lord Sandwich

    I never missed an episode of Kung Fu with David Carradine in the 1970’s. When I began training in martial arts 4 years ago, I went back and watched the pilot episode on Youtube. The bad guys were evil white racist capitalist overseers and the episode ends with Cane torching the railroad they had built on the backs of the poor Chinese laborers. I thought, “man, I had no idea I was being indoctrinated by Hollywood leftists back then.” Go watch it. You’ll see. Blatant as hell.

    • Melvin Bonzarelli

      David Carradine ended up committing suicide, hanged himself, wearing woman’s underwear, red stockings and a red garter belt. So perhaps he also realized how he was being used by Hollywood at the end.

      • He also did it in a hotel in Thailand. Most people who take sex vacations in Thailand go there for a different, non-solo sort of entertainment.

  • Melvin Bonzarelli

    Sesame Street, the brainchild of Joan Ganz Cooney and the Childrens Television Workshop. was a money-making machine from Day One. After the first season, way back when, it became apparent that the white, middle and upper class mothers were taking very little interest in seeing how the inner-city, impoverished underclass lived. So the change took place in season two and continued from there.
    Years ago, when I was living in a well-to-do Jersey suburb, I took my children to see “Bob”, the Sesame Street live character who was travelling in family-oriented shows along with the Sesame Street characters. We went to a Saturday performance at the Millburn-Short Hills High School. The audience was jammed with kids and parents. I don’t think that there was a family there that had less than a six-figure income. The REAL target audience for PBS, Sesame Street, and the Childrens Television Workshop. Bottom line, for anything that the Left does, it ends up being all about the benjamins.

    • CallahanAuto

      Ain’t this the truth. Look at one of Sesame Street’s main sponsors on PBS — Beaches Resorts. That’s not a cheap vacation!

  • jayvbellis

    Some good news that often goes unreported. Harlem is no longer an all Black slum.

    Let’s all learn from successful White gays on reclaiming blighted urban slums.

    Also learn from big city Liberals about the benefits of birth control, abortion rights for the underclass. And gun rights that work OK in rural areas of Alabama and Montana don’t work in underclass areas ofCamden New Jersey are Hartford CT.

  • jayvbellis

    PBS had a good side in the 1970s. Classy all White dramas produced by the BBc in England and run out of PBS in Boston. Masterpiece Theater hosted by Alister Cooke. Anglo American Civilization at it’s best – quite different than Ken a Burns PC, pro Black rapists &$&@ of today.

    • I still have the complete “Poldark” collection on DVD – Masterpiece Theater, late 1970s. It’s a period drama set in late 18th Century Cornwall: great stuff.

    • jayvbellis

      Agreed. British BBC, Boston Brahmin PBS promoted excellent classic British culture and comedy. My favorites were I Claudius and Fawlty Towers.

      The collapse of a White Britain is in many ways more shocking than the collapse of awhile America.

  • Garrett Brown

    You mean species?

  • Brady

    Oscar the Grouch must be a holdover from the shows ghetto roots. Stock stereotype of a homeless guy.

    • margotdarby

      There were protests in that first year that Oscar was an insulting depiction of ghetto dwellers…that they lived in trash cans and didn’t want to better their circumstances. As I dimly recall, Oscar was gradually dimmed down to a minor character, though at first he was as big as Kermit or Cookie Monster.

  • TXCriollo

    I never watched sesame street unless i was visiting family in new york, buffalo not nyc. My grandparents never really said much about it, but one time i had to be 5 years old and my grandfather said sesame street is not a place you want to live. For some reason i remember that, we went back to Texas and my mom asked if i wanted to watch it, after he said what he said I never watched it again

  • Ragnarök

    Instead of watching TV as a child my Dad read to me at night. One of my favorites was the “The Hobbit”.

  • silviosilver

    It’s one thing for those in power to want to keep the gravy train going, but doesn’t it amaze you that so many researchers can remain so blind (wilfully or otherwise) to the basic racial realities for so long? What goes in their minds? Why do they waste their talents and lives on projects that don’t stand a chance of working? I would dearly love to know because these people don’t make any sense to me at all.

  • Katherine McChesney

    Yuck.

  • There was a gay dentist in Florida who injected patients with his own HIV+ blood along with Novocain. He infected quite a few people.

    • kikz2

      wow.. somehow i’d missed that…..!!!!

  • I can’t remember the lyrics to the genuine Sesame Street theme song. What comes to mind is:

    Pushing drugs,
    Filling some creep with slugs
    Goons and thugs
    and the hideouts where the bosses meet
    Those are what we got right here –
    got right here on Mafia Street.

  • Napoleon Zarathustra

    Funny thing is, the “gritty realism” of Sesame Street wasn’t real at all.

    When I was little and noticed that at least where I lived, Black and White neighborhoods were separate, and Black neighborhoods were not multiethnic, magical, cohesive and “family oriented” nice places. I also knew that New York in the mid 70’s was a terrible place because people talked about it and it was on the news ALL the time. Most major cities were in bad shape at the time and experiencing a heavy dose of urban decay.

    Yet Sesame Street was clamoring to “Come and Play” because everything would be A-Okay. No it wouldn’t. You’d be raped, robed, beaten and killed in those places. Sesame Street was always condescending fantasy propaganda with an underlying directive for kiddies to be obedient in life.

    It clashed with me intellectually as a youngster because I was fed more of the classical European storytelling that involved adventure, exploration and nonconformity. Think Peter Rabbit, Alice In Wonderland, Hansel And Gretel. So yeah, I was more of a Mister Rogers kind of guy and I think he had the best advice for a little White kid at the time:
    Be smart, get an education and then get a good job so you can buy a house in a nice, small, White neighborhood where you can use you’re imagination to create and escape to any world you want that’s not this one.

  • jayvbellis

    Nah, it s a sexual self thing to get blood to certain parts, it s a rather pathetic self accident way to die.