Baby Names Reveal Parents’ Political Ideology

Stephanie Pappas, Live Science, June 5, 2014

Quick, make a guess: Are Liam’s parents Obama voters, or did they pull for John McCain? How about Kurt’s mom and dad?

If your gut suggested that Kurt’s parents might swing conservative while Liam’s are liberal, congratulations. A new study of baby names does, indeed, show that parents in liberal neighborhoods are more likely to choose softer, more feminine sounds, such as “L,” for their babies’ names, while conservative parents go for macho-sounding K’s, B’s and D’s.

The same research finds that liberal, well-educated parents are more likely to pick obscure names for their children, while conservative, well-educated parents take a more conventional naming path. Both methods seem to be a way of signaling status, said study researcher Eric Oliver, a political scientist at the University of Chicago–though it’s unlikely parents realize what they’re doing.

“I don’t think people are really aware of why they’re being drawn to certain names,” Oliver told LiveScience.

{snip}

The researchers used birth records from the 545,018 babies born in California in 2004, representing 52,589 different names. (This number includes unique spellings, such that “Madison” and “Madyson” would be counted separately.)

Using U.S. Census data and 2004 California precinct voting returns, the researchers were able to match the birth records to neighborhoods. Americans tend to sort themselves into neighborhoods that more or less match their ideology, so neighborhood-voting patterns were used as a proxy for the parents’ political leanings.

{snip}

Given that proxy measure, Oliver expected he would not see any differences between liberal and conservative parents, he said. He was wrong.

“The fact that we would find any kind of systematic differences, much less the magnitude of differences that we found–I really did not anticipate that,” he said.

The results revealed that overall, the less educated the parent, the more likely they were to give their child either an uncommon name (meaning fewer than 20 children got the same name that year in California), or a unique name (meaning only one child got that name in 2004 in California). When parents had less than a college education, there were no major ideological differences in naming choice.

However, among college-educated whites, politics made a difference. College-educated moms and dads in the most liberal neighborhoods were twice as likely as college-educated parents in the most conservative neighborhoods to give their kids an uncommon name. Educated conservatives were more likely to favor popular names, which were defined as names in the top 100 in California that year.

For boys, 46 percent got a popular name in conservative areas, compared with 37 percent in liberal areas. For girls, 38 percent were given a popular name in conservative neighborhoods, compared with 30 percent in liberal neighborhoods.

Notably, the kinds of uncommon names chosen by upper-class liberals differed from the unusual names picked by people of lower socioeconomic status, Oliver said. Lower-status moms tend to invent names or pick unusual spellings of common names (Andruw instead of Andrew, for example).

“Educated liberal mothers are not making names up,” Oliver said. “They’re choosing more culturally obscure names, like Archimedes or Finnegan–or, in our case, we named our daughter Esme.”

{snip}

The sounds of liberal and conservative names varied, too. For both boys and girls, liberals tended to pick more feminine-sounding choices, such as Liam, Ely and Leila–names that include lots of L sounds and soft-A endings, including popular choices Ella and Sophia.

Conservatives, on the other hand, tend to pick names with more masculine-sounding K’s, B’s, D’s and T’s, such as Kurt. A couple of famous national political families demonstrate that pattern, Oliver said: The liberal Obamas named their daughters Sasha and Malia, both names heavy on A’s and L’s, whereas the conservative Palin family picked more masculine-sounding names for both their boys and girls, particularly Track, Trig, Bristol and Piper (although third daughter Willow got a softer-sounding moniker).

{snip}

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  • Puggg

    I wonder how “Norman” fits in here.

    • IstvanIN

      Just call me chubbsy-wubbsy (if you are old enough to get that).

      • CallahanAuto

        Oh, Miss Crabtree!

    • Lagerstrom

      What about “Barry”?

    • Alexandra1973

      I think Norman is a decent name. I had a maternal uncle named Norman, he died of cancer, we believe it had something to do with Agent Orange (he was a Marine).

      My maternal grandmother had a brother named Norman. He was in the military, died in 1943 in Kasserine Pass in North Africa, fighting Rommel’s guys.

  • DaveMed

    Archimedes? Wow – I have certainly never encountered one of those.

    Quite a name if one can pull it off.

    • I’ve always like Nicodemus.

      • bilderbuster

        There once was a Negrodamus who claimed he could see the future.

        • John R

          No. Nostradamus could see the future. Negrodamus was able to complain about things even before they happened!

    • TruthBeTold

      Years ago, a Canadian radio comedy program was discussing a list of names that had ‘fallen out of favor’. One was Pontius Pilate.

      • DaveMed

        Haha! No kidding.

    • willbest

      Probably ends up being called Archie. Personally, I couldn’t conceive of naming a kid after one of the Greeks.

      • bilderbuster

        Alexander/Alex or the feminine version Alexandra/Sandra?
        I think the Greek names are Great!

        • willbest

          I guess I mean more along the lines of exceptionally famous names that haven’t been appropriated for common usage. So from a modern perspective Alexander is a common name that has several famous users. But there is only one Archimedes or Plato or Aristotle. Then again about 3,000+ people each year name their son Jesus…. which just blows my mind.

        • Alexandra1973

          My name also seems to be popular among Russians. I was named after a grandfather whose name was Alexander, and his father was from Belarus.

          • bilderbuster

            Greg or Gregory are Greek names from Gregorios (Watchful or Alert) that seem to be popular with Russians and Saints too.

          • LHathaway

            Boys and girls all over the world seem to be named different variations of the name Alexander.

          • Alexandra1973

            Yep. I have an uncle on my birth father’s side named Alexander, and a first cousin once removed on that side named Alexandria (I don’t spell mine with the i, apparently she does).

            I wouldn’t have minded giving my son the middle name of Alexander, but while my husband decided on Tyler for his first name, his middle name is his father’s name.

            We were trying to avoid William and Robert due to the number of relatives on his side with those names, and the large number of my relatives named Robert. My step/adoptive father’s name was Robert, I have a maternal uncle named Robert, my late aunt named her last child Robert…and that’s for starters.

            Though Roberta would have been more fitting a name for my sister than Rosalind, granted….

          • CallahanAuto

            Alexander is a popular name, at least in our New Jersey town. There are three Alexes in the third grade, including my son. There are a few Aidens and Jadens, too.

    • cranky_1970

      Kind of partial to Pythagoras, myself.

  • IstvanIN

    Most of the modern names are stupid sounding, including Malia, Track, Trig, Bristol and Pipe and Sasha is a boys name, not that those two would know that.

    • APaige

      Please YouTube George Carlin’s ‘guys named Todd.’ To paraphrase, soft names make for soft people, 10 out of 10 times Vinnie, Billy, and Eddie will beat the hell out of Kyle, Tucker and Todd.

      • bilderbuster

        Off topic, but the Tucker as a first name reminded me of some pet food commercials I’ve seen lately.
        I’ve noticed on television at least, that pet names are Anglo Saxon last names like Cooper and Baxter.
        Why don’t they give them sporty names like Buster?
        Or silly names like Keniesha?

        • Anglokraut

          Ha! Guilty, my Aussie shepherd mix is named Rufus, but my mom picked the name because she wanted a good name for a puppy that looked like he was going to be big.

          • bilderbuster

            My friend’s very large German Shepherd is named Rommel.

        • Who Me?

          One of my dogs is named Tucker. When I got him 6 1/2 years ago, my mother exclaimed she had never heard of someone naming a dog Tucker. I looked it up and at that time it was #12 on the most popular dog’s names, sooo

          • bilderbuster

            That does it.
            Our next dog will be named Willie Nelson!

      • Those are just short for Vincent, William and Edward.

        The most absurd “modern” white name I have encountered is Quartney. It is pronounced “Courtney”, but the girl’s 15 year-old mother was a drugged-up Skanktardistani, and thought it was cute. Since it is 31 years later, the poor girl probably goes by Courtney.

        • Rurik

          One of the “best” names I’ve heard is LeMonjello. Of course it is diverse.

  • David Ashton

    In Britain the white lumpenproletariat like boys with monosyllabic grunt names starting with K or D. Teachers are wary of Bradleys and Chantelles. Blacks do not yet have the amusing range of US female names, though I did teach a Terylene. Muhammad in various spellings seems to be rising to the top of the BAME list.

    • I understand that British blacks started the fad of hyphenated surnames (they seem aristocratic) that our blacks are taking up more and more.

      • David Ashton

        They are unlikely convincingly ever to surpass descendants of Admiral the Honorable Reginald Aylmer Ranfurly Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax. Nor are any of their women likely to look as beautiful as Gabriella Zanna Vanessa Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe aka Gabriella Wilde (whose incredibly sexy Movie Award legs can be [go]ogled on-line) before she married a relative commoner.

      • The greaseritos do that too. The funniest hyphenated name I have encountered was when a subcontinental Indian gal named Mangalopoli married a Greek, Mr. Phillipopolis. Of course they hyphenated the name.

    • TL2014

      Bame?

      • David Ashton

        Black & Minority Ethnics (following LGBT…s).

        For “colored” details see on-line “A Portrait of Modern Britain” by Rishi Sunak & Saratha Rajeswaran (Policy Exchange), Executive Summary, p.6.

        • Lagerstrom

          Jay-zuz! This gets worse everyday.

    • Rurik

      You be dissin’ Shitheadra now?

  • Georgia Boy

    “Lower-status moms tend to invent names or pick unusual spellings of common names (Andruw instead of Andrew, for example). “Educated liberal mothers are not making names up,” Oliver said. “They’re choosing more culturally obscure names, like Archimedes or Finnegan–or, in our case, we named our daughter Esme.”

    And if you’re not lower status but want to play one on the Internet, you’d mix the two styles and name your kid … Ta-nehisi.

    Thanks for clearing that up.

    • willbest

      Its actually a pain in the ass dealing with those people on a regular basis because they take pride in having a name that is spelled incorrectly.

      • Who Me?

        Even people with normal names have to spell their names just to avoid a problem with the perpetually offended types. My sister was asked for her name. She said, “Rose (_place VERY common last name here_)”. The woman at the desk asked her how to spell that. Sis gets this perplexed look on her face and says, very slowly and carefully, “R-O-S-E.” Then the idiot doing the asking says, “Oh, just like the flower!” (Ummm, yeah Ms. Clueless.)

    • MBlanc46

      “For Esme-With Love and Squalor”, a J.D. Salinger story of 1950. Lovely name.

      • Anglokraut

        If that name is getting more play now, it is probably because of the Twilight books. Esme is the matron of the Cullen vampire clan.

  • Mason Gull

    It disgusts me when people invent new spellings for common names. It looks stupid on paper and it doesn’t make the name more “unique”. It’s also a great way to mark your kid as white trash.

    • Germanicus

      It’s a nightmare for teachers, especially teachers of oh-so-sensitive, hormonally warping, junior-high girls. It all becomes another opportunity for the teacher to get dragged to the principal’s office for a reprimand for not being open to the feelings of the young monster when the teacher misspells one of the 27 variations of Kathy or can’t even come close to remembering the name, Twashanesha. It’s all dopey, info scramble which is the antithesis of intelligent order, but it gives the young, White, Leftie, feminists in training, soured by their premature sexual encounters, and the illiterate black, welfare-baby makers power over da Man. Superficial, ersatz individuality. I had a book, St. Augustine’s Confessions, which I set on a counter as I placed an order at a fast-food joint. The young black girl asked me what that (well really, ‘aks me what dat…’) book was about. I tried to explain. Searching for some common hook of experience, I asked if she had heard of St. Augustine, Florida…okay…more general concept, the New Orleans Saints. “Do you know what a ‘saint’ is supposed to be,” I asked. “No,” was her answer was, of course.

      When will the American cities with offending names be re-named? Bets αnyone?

      And Whites are chasing the blacks to the bottom of the trash basket. Did anyone really think that through integration of cultures that White culture would win out? The designers of integration certainly did not.

      My preference is for Christian names. One gets a feast day to celebrate every year plus one of “the great cloud of witnesses” interceding for you.

      You don’t buy that crap you say? Okay. Be my guest. But it has its natural, social function as well if you insist on thinking only in the temporal plane.

      • IstvanIN

        And Whites are chasing the blacks to the bottom of the trash basket.
        Did anyone really think that through integration of cultures that White
        culture would win out? The designers of integration certainly did not.

        As my grandmother always said, water always runs down hill. Civilization requires work, effort, rules and brains to maintain, otherwise it just runs downhill.

        • Germanicus

          If you can’t compete, violently toss the chessboard in the air. You know, that part I understand, actually. You pop into this world, find yourself black, and in particular a black that is not gifted, and it does seem like a very raw deal when the harsh reality starts sinking in. You blame Whitey, but deep down, you know that is not it–but it is so easy to hate Whitey.

          • John R

            I see what you are saying. But in reality the fact that you are born black is not White peoples’ fault. What they should think is: “I was born the most backward and inferior race of humans still existing. But, damn, I am so lucky to be born into a society that my ancestors had little part in building and I actually have the same rights as my betters.”

          • Germanicus

            John R, or what I say when considering myself and Asians or more talented people in general: I am going to do what I can with what I have. That is usually pretty good stuff regardless of the limitations of my talents. We each occupy a niche where more talented either do not occupy or can’t. Often times, less talented people can succeed in that niche by going laterally. Really talented people are sometimes encumbered by drill-down specialization. A good society puts it all together–that is–allows it to be put together without artificially interfering.

      • TL2014

        Hey, at least she asked you about the book!

        • Germanicus

          Yes, true. That’s the good part of the story.

        • Spikeygrrl

          At least she recognized “a book” on sight.

      • John R

        Just one comment: Of course with integration, black culture would win out. Things always go downward more easily than upward. Bad companions will always corrupt a good person easier than good companions will improve a bad person.

      • Rurik

        How about the name Chlamydia for the baby-girl?

        • Germanicus

          Rurik, I kid you not, I had a client named Clamydia, …let me rephrase that, … No, I don’t think I can. It would make an interesting name for a trashy novel wouldn’t it? And I really wasn’t kidding about her name.

    • Who Me?

      Try “Nevaeh”, which they say is Heaven, spelled backwards–and it is. It was also THE white trash name of choice a few years ago. Terrible. Bad enough spelled properly, but when they go to spelling things BACKWARDS….

      • Rurik

        Drut!

  • This is another example of our pincher society (overclass and underclass against the core middle). Both people in the elitist overclass (rich white liberals, SWPLs, etc.) and the lumpenproletarian underclass (among others, Africanus Bellcurvius), are the ones giving their children names that are somewhat unusual to downright garish. The normal names are coming from normal people, middle-ish income white traditional nuclear families.

    The same pattern presents in the two-party voting habits in Presidential elections.

  • Nancy

    Please, oh pretty please, someone do a study on the “class” of people who’s parents make up unintelligible, unpronounceable, nonsensical African-sounding names with random dashes, apostrophes, and the all-important letters V and Q.

    I’m giddy with anticipation for that one. :/

    • Who Me?

      Not to mention all the “royalty” names,such as King, Prince, Queen, and don’t forget the all important Marquis–in all it’s many and varied spellings (and pronunciations)…

      • TL2014

        Kingissac has to be a favorite..

    • Garrett Brown

      I’m quite partial to Shaquayquay.

      • Shientienchi G

        If I changed my name to that I bet I could get hired easier

    • italian guy

      I don’t know if the will do that, but those people need to stop using Latin and Italian names like Dante, Marcus, Rufus, De Andrè, etc. etc. i was looking for an English definition of the name Dante and I’ve seen people saying it’s a black name, the father of the Italian language must be turning in his grave.
      They stole the name Tyrone too, a long time ago you would expect some red-haired Irish man to have that name, now it’s associated with criminal behaviour…

  • If Sayaka and I have a boy, he will be named Owen.

  • tetrapod

    Is anyone surprised that leftist f*ggotry is now showing up in the names milquetoast white parents give their boys?

  • Bandmoo

    I thought the most popular for White males is “Ben Dover”, just by looking around and seeing what is going on.

    • tetrapod

      Perfect, given the decades-long castration of white men in movies, TV, and advertising.

      • Lagerstrom

        Yeah, but if you take notice of what the television tells you…

  • Bandmoo

    For blacks more like……322485-26

    • bilderbuster

      In oh so many cases that really is their legal name.

  • willbest

    Liberals seem somewhat keen on resurrecting names that haven’t been popular since the 1920s. It sort of feels like they are commemorating a great aunt that recently passed away.

    • Alexandra1973

      You’d think they’d want to stay away from what they consider to be ancient history. That great-aunt might have been a realist.

      • Spikeygrrl

        I dug DEEP into Old German to name my only child, and settled on Alaric. VERY unusual today; also very historic (there was a whole string of King Alarics). He’s now in his mid-30s and still loves the name that has made him a “one-namer” (like Bono and Beck) since grade school. “Alaric? Sure. EVERYBODY knows Alaric!” All in all, a memorable name for a memorable man.

        • Lagerstrom

          My son’s middle-name is ‘Ulric’, a little salute to the bit of German on my mother’s side.

      • Who Me?

        Just waiting for Ethel and Edith to come around again. Ugh!

  • Alexandra1973

    My son Tyler is named after some character in “Fight Club.” His dad liked the movie.

    Now I see–and hear of–girls named Tyler. One of my cousin’s daughters is named Taylor.

    I was named after a grandfather.

    • My mother’s high school boyfriend was “Michael”. I’m not his kid, but it probably nettled my dad a bit. My high school girlfriend was “Diane”, and my own daughter is Ariadne, after the wife of Theseus. It’s a classical name, easy to spell, and she’ll probably be the only Ariadne she knows. If we have another girl, she’ll be Penelope.

  • MBlanc46

    Liam is an old-line Irish/British name that I doubt very much would be considered feminine across the pond.

    • Lagerstrom

      Liam definitely is not feminine.

      • MBlanc46

        I believe that Ian Botham, the great Somerset and England all-rounder, named his son Liam. Beefy would not give his son an effeminate name.

        • Lagerstrom

          Yes, he did. I remember ‘Beefy’ quite well and saw him play several times back in the day.

  • none of your business

    Liam???? I know a mucho macho proud Irish electrician with a son named Liam. He is conservative as they come,married, homeowner in a 90 percent White suburb, his opinions of blacks are similar to the more moderate amren posters, goes to church, surfs, takes his family camping and fishing at their summer cabin etc etc. He’s also big and loud and gruff.

    Liberals absolutely loathe and despise people like that especially since they make an excellent living without having a BA in marxist anti White propaganda although many of them went through college while waiting for an apprenticeship to open up.

    Liam is a macho celtic name, Liam what’s name was perfect for mucho macho man Rob Roy.

    • Spikeygrrl

      The actor was Liam Neeson. No nancy-boy he!

  • Spikeygrrl

    I’m not buying what this “research” is selling. Both Liam and Kurt are names with a lot of White history and culture behind them. My first assumption was that Liam’s parents were probably of Irish extraction and Kurt’s of Germanic extraction.

  • none of your business

    There’s always Wyatt Trash. Very popular among rich Whites and jews are the medieval workers names like Tyler, Mason, Thatcher, Taylor, Draper, Fletcher Cutler, Sadler, Porter, Carter aka truck driver. Weird that a $500,000 a year stockbroker 5th generation White collar worker names his son Porter which was and is a very low paid unskilled job carrying things. At least a skilled occupation like Tyler or Fletcher. Wonder if hod carrier or lumper will become stylish.

    Maybe a thousand years from now stylish names among the rich will be welder, plumber, mechanic, , technician, bus driver, framer, clerk, drywall.

    • Valmont

      In Japan, Porter’s colleagues would call him Porto-San .

  • Valmont

    Once at a McDonald’s in Hong Kong, the lovely young Chinese woman at the cash register sported Aeroport on her name tag.

  • none of your business

    I don’t know if the monitors will let it pass but my son was in 8th grade with a chinese immigrant boy named Woo Suk Dong. Poor kid was in the yearbook too. Moral of the story, assimilate.

  • none of your business

    There have been many Princess Alexandras,very popular among N and E European royalty.

  • none of your business

    There was a set of boy girl twins in the south named Winn and Dixie after the supermarket chain. Actually it’s not bad. Winn could be short for Winston and is ok for a boy. Dixie is cute for a girl.

    • Valmont

      Good thing the parents didn’t shop at Piggly Wiggly.

  • none of your business

    Sushi is cute. Tempura is pretty and feminine, so is Sashimi, Broccoli is more masculine with the r and hard cs. Beets is a short, tough boys name probably grow up to be a lifer marine. Oats is another short tough boys name. Turnip is another tough boys name. Some hippies I heard about named their girl Celery

    isn’t Sasha a Russian boys nickname for Alexander or something? Well Obama’s mommie was a commie,surprised she didn’t name him Paul Robeson or what’s his name Du Bois who went back to Africa to start a revolution.

    • Valmont

      Doesn’t Condaleeza Rice have a younger sister named Sushi?

    • Rurik

      Yes. In Russian Sasha is a nickname (diminutive) for either a boy Aleksandr or girl Aleksandra.

  • none of your business

    Ninel was a girls name in the 1920’s. It was the reverse of Lenin popular with the progressive left.

    • Rurik

      The Bolshies had all sorts of weird names
      Vladlen.
      Melor (Mars Engels Lenin Oktobryskaya Revolutsiia)
      Zhores (the Russian spelling of the French Jaures)
      etc.

  • none of your business

    Finnegan is not obscure. It is a fairly common Irish last name.

  • none of your business

    100 years ago there was a rich guy in Texas named Hogg. He named his kids Ima, Shesa and Hesa. The girl Ima used her inheritance to establish museums

    • LHathaway

      Them Duke boys!

    • Ike Eichenberg

      Big Jim Hogg, he was governor of the state after Ima was born.

      Hesa, Shesa, or the commonly claimed Ura, were not names given to his children.

      The name Ima came from a poem written by Big Jim’s brother Thomas Elisha Hogg.

  • none of your business

    Brittany is a French province that has somehow morphed into a very popular girl’s name. When she was pregnant my sister joked she would name the baby after other French areas such as Perigord, Dordogne, Alpes-Maritimes. She named the baby Sarah oldie but goodie.

  • none of your business

    Valmont
    “Doesn’t Condaleeza Rice have a younger sister named Sushi?’ I think it’s a boy named Fortissimo.

  • LHathaway

    What the hell is a liberal neighborhood? A place that is, ironically, more racially segregated than most?

  • Shientienchi G

    If I get married all my children’s names will be of saints

    • Who Me?

      “If I get married all my children’s names will be of saints”

      That right there! “If I get married.” THAT’S the difference between the two types of names! Conservative White people get married, THEN have children and name them together. Certain other demographics have unwed single mothers who dropped out of school and gave birth to the child at 14 years of age, and gave the baby some godawful weird name she thought was cute or would impress her girlfriends.
      Most men want their child to have a name that is easy to remember, pronounceable, and easy to spell. Men are usually more sensible about what to name a kid. (White men, anyway.) At least they are more likely to give a boy a name that he is less likely to get teased about.
      (When I worked at an elementary school I noticed that the kids who had 3 or more given names, strangely spelled names, and many of the kids with hyphenated last names either had single mothers or mothers who were single when the child was born.)

      • When I was growing up in south Boulder, CO, my schools were overrun with variations of “Kristen”. There is nothing wrong with the name, but parents in the mid-to-late 1960s apparently lost any sense of originality.

        • Who Me?

          How many girls named Jennifer do you think there are that were born in the late 70’s to mid 80’s. For some reason that had to be the all-time most popular name in recent American history.

  • Douglas Quaid

    There is much in a name, a name should connect us to a family/cultural legacy and inspire us to imitate past greatness, our next boy will be named “William Wallace”. By way of contrast, I came into work a couple of months back and I saw the name of a new employee on the board with whom I would be working that day, “Nekosha”. That name alone gave me a pretty accurate idea of what I was in store for.

  • none of your business

    The Palin names are very unusual and neo hippie, new age neo pagan or something weird. Bristol is a town. How about Omaha for a girl and Seattle for a boy?

    • Who Me?

      Brooklyn and Dallas are pretty common girl’s names too.

      • Dallas is a family name, like “Scott”. Giving boys the first name “Scott” was faddish in the late 1960s. Roderick Stanley Dallas was the highest-scoring Australian ace of World War One (Robert Little may or may not have gotten more).

        Bristol, however isn’t even a family name. It’s Old English for “the place at the bridge”.

  • none of your business

    Remember when all the black girls were La Dumbo or La something? Now they are senior civil servants still just using up precious oxygen and White taxpayers money.

    • Chris Granzow XI

      I once had a black girl in my class named “LaQuanca.”

      • There was a black gal in my friend’s son’s class in junior high who’s named was pronounced “Shith-aid”. The moderators will never let the real spelling through. I actually met the poor gal later on, in 2005.

        • Who Me?

          She couldn’t scrape together $150 to get her first name legally changed?

  • none of your business

    Spikyygirl
    Didn’t an Alaric conquer Italy cerca 400 AD?

  • B.A_2014

    Benjamin William Alexander Mac Mhurchu. Masculine or feminine you decide?

  • John R

    “I knew my son would grow up without a father, so I gave him a name that he would have to defend and be tough to survive. I named my son Sue!”
    -Johny Cash

  • John R

    Gosh, I am named after my father, as he was named after his. Gee. We must be politically to the right of Genghis Khan.

    • WR_the_realist

      Ha! If I had a boy I’d name him Genghis and really tic off the liberals.

  • Who Me?

    And then there are people like my husband and I that thought we gave our son a manly, but fairly scarce name, and when he went to school, found out he was one of several boys his age with the same first name… Now it;s becoming increasingly popular as a girl’s name of all things. One of my nephews is named Quinn, and that too is becoming a girl’s name.

  • Mark Caplan

    “Conservatives, on the other hand, tend to pick names with more masculine-sounding K’s, B’s, D’s and T’s….”

    Ku Klux Klan has a nice masculine-sounding ring.

  • Shientienchi G

    Key and Peele has a funny skit with a sub teacher that can’t get any of the students names correctly. Hint, the teacher previously taught in the inner city.

  • sulbernick

    La Victom D’Oppressed. Any idea who that name might belong to? Or how about God L’Omnipotent?

    • Who Me?

      Some idiot(s) in the news a year or so ago named their kid Messiah…Judge made them change it, I think.

  • Ike Eichenberg

    I needed someone to tell me liberals are pansies, no way I could have figured that without a study.

  • none of your business

    Ike Eichenberg
    Big Jim Hogg, thanks live and learn.

  • Leon NJ

    Leon is a nice strong name. I had a childhood friend named Charles which also sounds conservative and an overall good name.

  • PvtCharlieSlate

    One place where I worked the manager was Dr R K A_____. He signed everything that way: two initials and surname. A few of his old-time co-workers called him “Roy.” It was years later that I learned (accidentally) that his parents had christened him “Royal King.”
    He was a wee bit odd.

  • none of your business

    A teacher told me about a black girl named La-a. It was pronounced La Dasha cuz a dash don be slien