Chamber of Commerce Declares 2014 the ‘Year of Immigration Reform’

Elizabeth Harrington, Washington Free Beacon, January 8, 2014

Thomas Donohue, the president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, declared 2014 the “year of immigration reform,” Wednesday, during his annual state of American business address.

“We’re determined to make 2014 the year that immigration reform is finally enacted,” Donohue said. “The chamber will pull out all the stops—through grassroots lobbying, communications, politics and partnerships with our friends in the union, and faith-based organizations, and law enforcement groups, and others to get this job done.”

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“Throughout history, immigrants have brought innovation, ideas, investments, and dynamism to American enterprise,” he said. “And in terms of demographics, we need immigration.”

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During a press conference following his address, Donohue said he is “encouraged” by what he hears coming out of the House of Representatives and believes they will pass immigration reform later this year.

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“2013 we liked,” Donohue said. “We made a deal in the Senate, we did that with a cooperative basis with the AFL-CIO, and with lots of other people, then we started working in the House, where I believe we’ve received a very positive response—a different way of doing business—435 people, not just 100 of them.”

“We brought in faith-based [groups] and folks from all sorts of social activities, community leaders, and we brought business people in who see opportunities to create jobs, and what we’re going to do is a lot more of the same,” he said. “And we’re going to do it back home, as well.”

“My own view, I think Democrats and Republicans alike would like to go home and run for office with something they got done that’s significant,” Donohue added. “I believe we’re two-thirds of the way there.”

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