The Background of Real Conflict in the World

János Bencsik, Jobbik, November 15, 2013

Why is Turkey important, do we need to ally with Muslim countries and what do Western European radical patriots have to say about it? Interview with Gábor Vona about his lectures in Turkey as well as about Islam and immigration.

During your trip in Turkey, you held lectures at several universities. Have you established contacts with political and economic players?

I held lectures at four Turkish universities, and I had an almost unimaginably positive reception. Of course, it wasn’t just for me, it was for Jobbik and the entire Hungarian nation. Even the standing room was completely occupied at my lectures, many people just couldn’t get in. Naturally, I also met political and economic players during my trip. For example, the leaders of 25 NGOs of Istambul organized a ceremonial dinner in my honour one night. Perhaps, the effect of this trip and my reception is best shown by the fact that I was recognized by several people in the streets of Istambul, a city with a population of 20 million. A U18 Turkish international soccer player came up to me and hugged me in the underground station. Visiting them as a brother and not as an enemy meant a lot to them.

Why is Turkey so important?

I have been talking about the strategic importance of Turkey for years. It is a country with a population of 80 million, which has the second largest army within NATO and its economic development of the past 10 years can only be compared to that of China. Its political and economic influence impacts the entire Muslim world, especially Central Asia. Not to mention that it was the state that sent ships with humanitarian aid to the Gaza Strip. So it’s a safe assumption that Turkey is a great power and is getting stronger and stronger. The Turks–in spite of our struggles and confrontation in the past–love us. Remembering our struggles, they say it was a very tough fight. There’s a Turkish saying: You don’t know what fight means before you fought a Hungarian. There is a large road in the centre of Istambul that is called the Road of Hungarian Brothers.  At school, they teach their children that Hungarians and Turks are relatives. A huge number of people participate in the Kurultaj with great enthusiasm. Considering all the above, Hungarian foreign policy would make a grave mistake if we allowed this relationship to deteriorate, when we are lacking international allies.

Will Hungary directly profit from the visit of Jobbik’s president to Turkey?

Yes, it will.

What will the benefits be?

If a country of this size is increasingly interested in us, in fact they consider us friends and brothers, is a great benefit in itself. This may bear countless economic, political and cultural fruits. I am working very hard to achieve that. Many skeptical people will be greatly surprised.

In your lectures, you were talking about Turanic cooperation as well as Islam, which in your words is the last beacon of light of humanity in the darkness of globalism. What did you mean by that?

I mentioned this in an article back in 2010. I said then that the real distinction is not between different religions, countries and cultures, but between communities attempting to preserve traditions and anti-traditional, global liberalism. If you look closely, you can see it is the Muslim world that still can best resist the monopolar world order dominated by the United States. They do have a lot of problems, countless worrying phenomena, such as the unpredictable course of events in the Arab world. Comparing it to the Christian civilisation in our region however, you can see that Muslim countries are much less dependent.

Does this mean that we Hungarians should ally with Muslim countries?

We should ally with those fighting for a just world order. This could be a country, a community and it could be Christian, Muslim or Buddhist. The point is that they should not be the servants of global liberalism. Hungary now names as allies the countries that have destroyed our economy, exploit our cheap labour, have taken our markets and feed us their own products, force us into completely pointless wars, tread on our national traditions, label us as racist all the time and do not respect us at all. Is this good for us? I ask.

Nevertheless, isn’t it strange that the Roman Catholic president of a party advocating Christian values in a Christian country is making pro-Islam statements?

It is. Especially, if they are misinterpreted. My statement did not mean that I advocate Islam at the expense of Christianity. What I said was that the Islam civilization protects its own tradition more strongly than Christianity does. And that is a fact. I wish Christian churches were more courageous and efficient in protecting national traditions, I wish they clearly and explicitly condemned the intellectual and mental environmental pollution poured on us by liberalism. As a Roman Catholic, I have pointed out several times that the church should not be content with just being a social institution and letting lies exercise their destructive effects. They should undertake the ideological fight as well. So I was not speaking out against Christianity, I was speaking out for it.

What does Christianity mean for Jobbik and you?

Jobbik is a political party that defines itself on the basis of Christian values. The relationship with God is of course a personal matter. Being a European and a Hungarian, for me Christianity means the universal human values that are common in all major religions. Therefore I consider inter-religious dialogue to be very important. At national level, this means ecumenism, while it means the cooperation of religions on a global scale. The role of Turanic alliance can be exemplary in this regard, since there are Christian, Muslim and Buddhist Turanic nations as well as ones with other religions. I don’t know if you noticed that the president of Jobbik, a party considered aggressive and xenophobic, is talking about the dialogue between cultures and religions. I don’t think this interview will make it to the front page of atv.hu, the website of a liberal Hungarian channel. It doesn’t fit their prejudices about us. We are the ones actually stereotyped.

Aren’t you afraid that these statements will block a potential cooperation with Western European national radical parties?

Those who suffer from the problems caused by immigration in Austria or France will find it very difficult to look upon Islam as an ally in the fight against liberal globalism. I understand their anger. However, they must also understand that they cannot judge a community of 1.5 billion people based on the behavior of the immigrants in their country. Similarly, my standpoint about Islam neither means that Europe should become Muslim nor does it mean that I support immigration. In fact, I often emphasize that I appreciate all nations and cultures and I would love to learn more about them–in their own countries.

What’s your opinion about Muslim extremists?

Extremism is relative, obviously. We, Jobbik members know it very well, since we are regularly labelled as extremists by the liberal media. Of course, I condemn terrorism, just like the invasive wars marching under the pretentious banner of anti-terrorism. I think this is the most gruesome practice in the world today.

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  • Spartacus

    “At school, they teach their children that Hungarians and Turks are relatives.”

    ———————————————————————————————————————

    Is there anything I need to add ?

    • Zaporizhian Sich

      Hungarians and Turks were enemies, and still are enemies thanks to Ottoman invasion and occupation of the country in the 16th century.

  • bigone4u

    Many Hungarians have a dark complexion and look like Mexicans to me. I suppose that’s the effect of invasions by Genghis Khan, Attila the Hun, and rule by the Turkish empire. I’m not sure I understand this article, but it seems to me that the best course of action for all of Europe would be to preserve what racial and religious purity is left.

    • Spartacus

      I met quite a few Huns in my life, I never had the impression their complexion is dark. The ones you saw might be hungarianized gypsies. In Hungary, huns were a minority, so they tried to assimilate Romanians/Serbs/Slovaks/Gypsies/Jews/Pols/etc. But most Hun gypsies that I know of and that have been assimilated are still gypsies, they just speak Hungarian and have hunic names.

      • bigone4u

        I earned my doctoral degree from a university that is heavily Jewish. I used to see some of the female Jewish students with white skin and “Chinese eyes.” I’ve seen “Chinese eyes” on Hungarians too. I’ve always assumed it was the asian genes coming out in the shape of the eyes.

        • M.

          Generally, the slant-eyed Europeans of today have either some Hun or Alan ancestry.

        • Bossman

          Yes, some Jews may have acquired Asian genes even if they are not aware of it.

        • NoMosqueHere

          what are chinese eyes? I haven’t seen many whites or jews with chinese features.

      • I think what you wrote with this is that you do not want to have the Magyars an ethnic homeland. We’d be better off saying that there is really no such thing as “England”.

        • Spartacus

          Huh ?

    • Jefferson

      The late Charles Bronson was a dark Hungarian. He definitely did not look like a Nordic Aryan.

      • bigone4u

        Right. Charles Bukowski (aka Charles Bronson) early in his career played Apache indian roles and I think even Mexicans.

        • Jefferson

          The 1970s commercial with the “Indian” man with a tear in his eye, was actually played by an Italian guy.

          it was common back in the days for Hollywood to cast darker Caucasoids in Native American roles because of the lack of real Native Americans in the entertainment industry.

          • Bossman

            I read somewhere of some well-known American Indian icon was really an Englishman who chose to go through life masquerading as an Indian. I’m sure a Google search could show his identity.

          • Jefferson

            I wonder how many fake American Indians there are in the U.S. Meaning people who have little Amerindian admixture or even no Amerindian admixture at all yet they go around claiming to be 100 percent Geronimo/Pocahontas.

          • Bossman

            The big question is why would they do that? Is there some profit in it? Do they like American Indians very much? Some very attractive people in the movies, past and present, have claimed or are claiming to be part native American. Why would they do that if they don’t have to?

          • Bill_der_Berg

            Archibald Stansfeld Belaney became famous as Grey Owl. He lived in Canada.

          • Bossman

            Thanks for that bit of information.

          • Katherine McChesney

            I read that the ‘crying Indian’ was an Italian Jew.

          • Bill_der_Berg

            Some Red Indians resented the fact that Hollywood employed Jewish and Italian actors to play Indians. They called them ‘Schmohawks’ and ‘Wopahos’.

      • Xerxes22

        Charles Bronson (real name Charles Buchinisky or Buchinski) was of Lithuanian and Lithuanian Tatar descent. That’s where he got his asiatic features. He didn’t even learn English untill he was in his teens.

    • M.

      I don’t think those are ethnic Hungarians. I watched lately a TV report on Budapest, and the people in it looked completely European to me. Practically all of them had either brown or blonde hair, and were fair-eyed too.

      Anyway, here’s the ethnic composition of Hungary:
      83.7% Hungarians
      3.1% Roma
      1.3% Germans
      14.7% undeclared

      So I think those who don’t look European must either be part of the Roma gypsies or the undeclared.

  • sbuffalonative

    He’s right about one thing and one thing only. Muslims aren’t giving into the demands of the globalists to transform their nations, culture, and religion to accommodate modern politically correct ideals.

    Other than that he’s very misguided because Muslims have every intent on transforming other nations, cultures, and religions to their world view.

    You can admire Muslims at a distance for bucking the trend but to believe they will add something positive to your culture or that they will be accepting and accommodating to you is beyond ignorant.

    The fox wants to get into the chicken coop not to make friends with the chicken but to devour them.

    • NoMosqueHere

      Islamists may be bucking political correctness in the nations they control, but they are using it to infiltrate and impose sharia law on feckless white nations. Would you rather live in a liberal white society or an islamic sharia state stuck in the 7th century? Muslims have nothing to offer white nations except conflict.

    • ThatguyinTN

      I think he was spot on when he talked about ” I wish Christian churches were more courageous and efficient in
      protecting national traditions, I wish they clearly and explicitly
      condemned the intellectual and mental environmental pollution poured on
      us by liberalism.” and ” my standpoint about Islam neither means that Europe should become
      Muslim nor does it mean that I support immigration. In fact, I often
      emphasize that I appreciate all nations and cultures and I would love to
      learn more about them–in their own countries.” I think about the only way to get our white heritage back is thru the churches. People tend to listen to what churches have to say as being morally sound and not many people condemn churches. Besides lets not forget what the US was founded on.

  • Sick of it

    So Jobbik is fighting liberal globalism…by adhering to liberal globalism? Just the pro-Islam variety.

  • Pelagian

    I like the idea of an anti-liberal world coalition. He was saying some good things. But this is where I jumped ship: “The relationship with God is of course a personal matter. Being a European and a Hungarian, for me Christianity means the universal human values that are common in all major religions. Therefore I consider inter-religious dialogue to be very important. At national level, this means ecumenism, while it means the cooperation of religions on a global scale. “

  • Rhialto

    I don’t know the potential value of Turk-Hungarian alliances, so I won’t comment. On the other hand, White men are in a desperate situation and must be ready to cooperate with any groups if it is the advantage of White men and to their race.

  • Franklin_Ryckaert

    The best Muslim is a remote Muslim. Keep these “allies” at a distance! Has this man never heard of the Turkish siege of Vienna? Does he even know that Istanbul once was a Greek city called Constantinople? Ever heard about jihad and its role in Islam? This flirting with Islam is insane.

    As for Hungarians being “Turanian” and being akin to Turks, there is some truth in that. The Magyars were a Finno-Ugric people living near the Urals before they invaded Hungary. During their migration they allied with a Turkic tribe, hence there are Turkic elements in the Hungarian language. They were however a minority in their new homeland and assimilated with the Europeans living there. Nowadays Hungarians are racially mainly European. Flirting with an “Asian” identity (they even include Koreans and Japanese as their “kinsmen”!) makes no sense for these Europeans. If they don’t feel at home in Europe then let these “Turanians” go back to the steppes of Central Asia!

    • NoMosqueHere

      Islam is a warrior and inherently violent religion, so flirting with them is very dangerous for a christian nation.

      But the warrior nature of Islam is its primary appeal. Many blacks in american prisons find Islam appealing — it appeals to their violent nature. And I suppose some whites, including these Jobbik guys, find it appealing for the same reason.

  • dd121

    I was in Turkey and that picture is atypical of Turks. There are some blond hair blue eyed people from Europeans who got mixed in but the majority have brown hair, brown eyes and flat heads in the back.

    • Martel

      I don’t know even one single immigrant Turk who looks like that. I live in an area infested by Turkish immigrants.

  • M.

    Yeah, that’s a descendant of some abducted European slave right there!
    Not representative at all of the average Turk. The real Turks belong to the Turkic peoples. They’re closer to Mongols than they are to Europeans.

  • hastings88

    “However, they must also understand that they cannot judge a community of
    1.5 billion people based on the behavior of the immigrants in their
    country.”

    Why not? It’s a good sampling. Actually, those in Europe are probably the most intelligent and enterprising of muslims. (And that’s not saying much.)

    • ThatguyinTN

      He has a point you can’t judge based on the actions of a few but you can judge based on their violent holy text. Their own doctrine is violent and oppressive so if we compare their religious icon to christianity’s or Jesus to mohammed (sp) and assume all good christians try to emulate christ and all good muslims mohammed. The differences are glaringly obvious and the violent nature of mohammed is all I need to know about muslims to know I don’t want to be around them.

  • Martel

    He should have supported Turkish Nationalism, not Islam.

    • TEE207

      I pray that my comment is not deleted like my previous ones. It seems that AmRen’s editors do not like views that do not reflect their outlook. So much for freedom of expression.
      Gabor Vona is right. Perhaps he is the ONLY European nationalist today who has understood History in contemporary times and past times. The only force that stands against the “Gog & Magog Globalization” is Islam (not Turkish Nationalism) and to a lesser extent Orthodox Christianity. Although he should NOT seek to make an alliance with the NATO Turkish government but with the Turkish people living in rural Anatolia. The NATO Turkish government is part and parcel of the Gog & Magog world order and would stab Hungary in the back just like it is stabbing Muslims in Syria. It matters not that they got Israel to apologize or helped in the Gaza blockade.
      Europe is too far gone to be saved as a whole save perhaps some Eastern European countries like Ukraine, Greece etc. The National Socialist Germans were perhaps the only Western People to try to liberate themselves from the unholy usurious Judeo-Christian alliance which eventually turned Christendom into the Godless West and look what the rest of their European cousins did to them! Gabor Vona knows this (not to mention that Western Europe stabbed Hungary in the back post WW I) & wishes to save Hungary and Europe CANNOT & WILL NOT do that as Europe is the heart of this Gog & Magog World order which ultimately seeks to impose upon Mankind a (messianic) rule from Jerusalem with NATO being the latest military wing of this world order. The only force(s) in the world that
      can stand up to this last phase of Gog & Magog’s (aka Modern Western Civilization) quest to transfer power to Israel are Islam and Orthodox Christianity. There will be an alliance (there are signs of this occurring slowly) between the Islamic world and the Orthodox World to fight against Israeli/Jewish/NATO oppression. Jobbik would do well to make an alliance with these two forces and help liberate Constantinople from Khazar led NATO. It would be unique for a Catholic country to do so in this age.

  • SFLBIB

    Why is Turkey so important?

    Because it controls the Bosphorus and the Dardanelles.

  • Spartacus

    The Hungarian kingdom had an assimilation policy for non-huns in their lands. That’s what I meant.

  • Mark Hillyard

    I’m reading a small book Faith and Obedience an introduction to Biblical law, by Rousas John Rushdoony. “When Wyclif wrote of his English Bible that “This Bible if for the government of the people, by the people, and for the people,” it reminded me of something I read some time ago. Now where was that?
    Anyway, the book points out that there is no possibility for people to say “We don’t want religion dictating morals to us!” That’s an impossibility simply because morality is defined by some form of religion, weather it be humanism, Christianity or some other religion. There must be a standard of moral law.
    That word “antinomianism” is new to me as in that I’ve heard of it before but had no idea that some Christians, according to this book, believe that there is a Christian Dispensation in which we are under Grace and not law. Therefore the followers of such a thought are “anti-law, which may explain why Christians aren’t as defensive in guarding their nation and law as Islam is, as stated in the article.