When It’s OK to Be a Racist

Will Offensicht, Scragged, August 30, 2012

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The New York Times responded to the attack in the Sikh temple by claiming that hate crimes are under-reported:

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. told the Senate in 2009 that “we have a significant hate crimes problem in this country.” The recent murders at the Sikh temple in Wisconsin have raised this issue in the public consciousness.

The Times is worried that a lot of hate crimes are prosecuted as if they were ordinary crimes and don’t show up in the statistics.  The Times ignores the fact that a significant number of hate crimes are fakes.  Theyargue that we need to find more hate crimes to punish, specifically hate crimes committed by white people.

The shooting rampage on Sunday that killed six people and wounded three others at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin exposed the continued dangers of white power extremism in our midst. The shooter, Wade M. Page, was affiliated with a range of neo-Nazi skinhead groups, and during the last decade, he played in several prominent bands in the white power music scene.

The Times would have us believe that thousands of neo-Nazis thrive in the “white power” music scene, downloading Aryan music and chatting online about offenses committed by non-whites.

Law enforcement and anti-racist activists should pay close attention to the scene as a motivating force for hate crime because when extremist ideas endure, so does the potential for extremist actions.

The Times believes that police should pay disproportionate attention to white groups which sing certain Aryan songs because of the “potential for extremist actions.”

What About Black Hate Songs?

Has the Times never heard of rap?  These lyrics are by “artists” who’ve won Grammy awards, the music industry’s highest honor.

“Kill the white people; we gonna make them hurt; kill the white people; but buy my record first; ha, ha, ha”

“Kill d’White People”; Apache, Apache Ain’t Shit, 1993, Tommy Boy Music, Time Warner, USA.

“I kill a devil right now … I say kill whitey all nightey long … I stabbed a fucking Jew with a steeple … I would kill a cracker for nothing, just for the fuck of it … Menace Clan kill a cracker; jack ‘em even quicker … catch that devil slipping; blow his fucking brains out”

“Fuck a Record Deal”; Menace Clan, Da Hood, 1995, Rap-A-Lot Records, Noo Trybe Records, subsidiaries of Thorn EMI; called The EMI Group since 1997, United Kingdom.

It doesn’t take much googling to find a great many “hate songs” urging black people to commit violence against whites.  The Times assumes the tiny handful of  white people who sing songs about murdering non-whites will commit murder and therefore ought to be watched.  The Times’ own statistics say that the average black person is 20 times more likely to commit a violent crime than a white person.  Why not watch black people who sing songs about black people murdering whites, particularly when there are so many more of them and, unlike totally obscure white-power music, violent rap songs are blasted across the public airwaves from coast to coast?

If the Times were serious about monitoring singing groups to forestall violence, they’d look at black groups who sing about murdering whites.

The Black Crime Wave

The Wall Street Journal reports that the black murder rate is increasing even though overall crime rates are dropping.

More than half the nation’s homicide victims are African-American, though blacks make up only 13% of the population.  Of those black murder victims, 85% were men, mostly young men.

An average black is more than 4 times more likely to be murdered than a white.  The article reports that 6% of black murder victims are killed by whites whereas 14% of white murder victims are killed by blacks.  Blacks kill twice the fraction of white murder victims as whites kill black murder victims; if the writers of white-power music are trying to incite whites to violence against blacks, they’re nothing like as successful as rap artists doing the same thing in reverse.

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