Is Trump a Cuck?

Gregory Hood, American Renaissance, December 20, 2017

He’s trending that way.

President Trump has become an avatar for white identity politics. The Alt-Right championed his candidacy; the leftist media has endlessly denounced him as a racist, a bigot, or a white nationalist himself. Yet President Trump has acted no differently from any other president when it comes to bowing before the idols of political correctness and multiculturalism. He continues to embarrass himself by honoring “civil rights heroes” and otherwise pandering to non-whites who loathe him. More importantly, President Trump has never once spoken out in explicit defense of European-Americans.

Donald Trump poses with representatives from the Historically Black Colleges and Universities. (Credit Image: © Aude Guerrucci/CNP via ZUMA Wire)

This critique should not be overstated. No one expected President Trump to solve the most pressing problems facing European-Americans, but there has been progress, including increased immigration enforcement, pressing foreign nations to accept their deported criminals, and pulling out of the UN migration pact. And only President Trump pushed back against a unanimous Congressional resolution condemning “hate” after the Unite the Right rally,  He attached a signing statement that criticized “hatred, bigotry, and racism in all forms,” not just the evil “white nationalists.” President Trump’s condemnation of the NFL’s “Take A Knee” protests is also a welcome repudiation of Black Lives Matter and its anti-white, anti-police message.

But even during his candidacy, President Trump was never a champion of European-Americans as such. His immigration policies were, in substance, no different from what liberal Democrats such as Barbara Jordan were proposing not long ago. And while President Trump has been termed a “civic nationalist,” he also specifically appealed to black Americans as a group.

Just before the election, in the critical swing state of North Carolina, Mr. Trump delivered a speech calling for a “new deal for black America.” Speaking before an audience the Charlotte Observer noted was “predominantly white,” President Trump promised he would “never ever” take the African-American community for granted. Like every other Republican campaigning for the black vote, Mr. Trump seized on “school choice” as a panacea, listing it as the first point on his “plan for urban renewal.” More importantly, President Trump clung to the usual narrative about how African-Americans serve as the moral leaders of the nation.

“African-American citizens have sacrificed so much for our nation,” Mr. Trump said. “They’ve fought and died in every war since the Revolution. They’ve been in the pews and the picket lines. They’ve lifted up the conscience of our country in the long march for civil rights.” President Trump also bemoaned the high rates of poverty and unemployment among African-Americans.

Of course, President Trump lost the black vote overwhelmingly—88 percent to 8 percent. But President Trump was still able to win the election, partially because Hillary Clinton did not generate the kind of enthusiasm she needed to get the black turnout required for a Democrat victory. Now, however, there are signs that increased black hatred of President Trump will cost Republicans seats in the 2018 mid-term elections and in 2020. Higher-than-expected black turnout doomed President Trump’s candidate, Roy Moore, in the recent Alabama Senate election. According to Pew Research Center, President Trump’s current approval rating among blacks has fallen from an already dismal 14 percent in February 2017 to only 7 percent by December. The fact that blacks seem to be doing better economically under President Trump makes no difference.

This decline continues despite President Trump constantly paying rhetorical tribute to civil rights and trying to appeal specifically to blacks. Earlier this month, President Trump lauded Rosa Parks on the anniversary of the Montgomery bus boycott. He said Parks had defended “the truth etched into our Declaration of Independence, that all of us regardless of the color of our skin are created equal by God.”

The President’s speech was met with scorn by most blacks. “Mr. Trump needs to take Rosa Parks’ name out of his lying mouth,” black columnist Leonard Pitts  Jr. wrote. “He sullies it by speaking it.” On Twitter, leftists and journalists (but I repeat myself) also interpreted Trump’s praise as an insult, and a host of articles gleefully reposted criticism of the President and implied he was a racist. As one black singer demanded, “Don’t you dare utter any words our Queen #RosaParks uttered.”

Similarly, President Trump recently visited the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Mississippi. He dutifully repeated the party line:

The Civil Rights Museum records the oppression inflicted on the African-American community—the fight to end slavery, to end Jim Crow, to gain the right to vote—so that others might live in freedom. Today we pay solemn tribute to our heroes of the past and dedicate ourselves to building a future of freedom, equality, justice, peace.

Jackson, Mississippi, is the beleaguered city that elected Chokwe Lumumba—the former “Vice President of the Republic of New Africa”—mayor in 2013,  The mayor died soon after taking office and was succeeded by his son, Chokwe Antar Lumumba, who promised to make Jackson “the most radical city on the planet.”

Needless to say, Mayor Lumumba boycotted the President’s visit and bragged about his decision on the far-left Democracy Now network. Congressman John Lewis of Georgia called President Trump’s visit an insult and refused to attend, as did Congressman Bernie Thompson of Mississippi. NAACP President Derrick Johnson called President Trump’s visit “an affront to the veterans of the civil rights movement.” There were protests outside the event.

The reason the museum even exists is because of the blundering of an archetypal cuckservative, former Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour. Governor Barbour, a passionate supporter of liberalizing immigration laws and a pillar of the GOP Establishment, had dreams of becoming president. But he made the mistake of saying he didn’t remember the tensions surrounding the civil rights movement in Mississippi “being so bad.” He was predictably crucified by the media. As a way to buy himself some positive public relations (with taxpayer money), Barbour pushed hard for $38 million in state financing for the civil rights museum, even lobbying individual members of the state legislature. Thus it was that predominately white Southern Republican taxpayers wrote the check to enable black Mississippians to lecture them about racism.

Unfortunately, President Trump is showing similar tendencies. He has gone out of his way to thank his black supporters. He has also thanked his Hispanic supporters and hosted an event celebrating “Hispanic Heritage Month.” He has specifically thanked his homosexual supporters and appealed for their votes. He even famously thanked his “poorly educated” supporters. Yet not once has President Trump specifically thanked the European-American supporters who delivered him victory. They are politically invisible, and unlike his black supporters, he takes them for granted. The closest President Trump has ever come to explicit recognition was when he retweeted a video from “Can’t Stump The Trump,” (now Comrade Stump) on Twitter, which featured a Pepe the Frog symbol and a screenshot talking about the importance of the white vote.

Indeed, President Trump, who is quick to take to Twitter to answer insults from obscure celebrities, has nothing to say about Twitter’s current crackdown on many of his supporters. Though President Trump’s FCC nominee has ended “Net Neutrality” in the face of furious media opposition and highlighted the political bias of companies such as Google and Twitter, the Commander in Chief has failed to make even a general statement in support of free speech. Though he constantly attacks media bias, he doesn’t make any real efforts to dismantle the enemy media by helping alternatives such as Gab.

Thus far, President Trump’s one major legislative victory is the recently passed tax cut proposal which mostly helps the upper class and has been applauded by the same establishment conservatives who opposed his candidacy. As Ann Coulter stated, this is Bush Redux. But the parallel may be deeper than she knows.

George W. Bush endlessly prostrated himself before blacks and even dispatched his Republican National Committee Chair to apologize to the NAACP for the “Southern Strategy.” (It was dismissed as an “empty apology.”) Ultimately, blacks’ view of George W. Bush was best summarized by Kanye West when he claimed that “George Bush doesn’t care about black people.” Incredibly, George W. Bush called this nonsensical insult from a rapper the worst moment of his presidency.

President Trump is tough with political opponents. He’s tough with media critics. He’s tough with his subordinates. But he’s in the same tired defensive crouch when it comes to race. Because President Trump is starting to lose some of his white evangelical and working class supporters, he could try something new. He doesn’t have to challenge the civil rights story. To all appearances he believes what he says about blacks and their struggles. But he could stop genuflecting. Instead, he could highlight the challenges facing the white working class.

A cuck praises people who despise him. President Trump is falling into this pattern. If he wants a second term, it’s white voters, not blacks, he needs to “never ever” take for granted. And before it’s too late, President Trump needs to stop wasting time in Jackson, Mississippi, and start spending some time in the Rust Belt helping white swing voters who are the only reason he got to the White House in the first place.

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Gregory Hood
Mr. Hood has been active in conservative youth movements in the US.
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