A Year to Remember: 2016

Chris Roberts, American Renaissance, December 31, 2016

Some reflections.

In 1992 the late libertarian polymath Murray Rothbard proclaimed:

With the inspiration of the death of the Soviet Union before us, we now know that it can be done. We shall break the clock of social democracy. We shall break the clock of the Great Society. We shall break the clock of the welfare state. We shall break the clock of the New Deal. We shall break the clock of Woodrow Wilson’s New Freedom and perpetual war. We shall repeal the 20th century.

I am too young to remember the jubilation that followed the collapse of international Communism, but I think the election of Donald Trump could be as important as the fall of the Berlin Wall. Both moments proved the pessimists wrong, and Herbert Stein right: “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.” Communism is an unnatural and inhuman state of affairs, a form of government suitable to none. So is the reign of political correctness, egalitarian managerialism, and open borders. Donald Trump may yet disappoint white advocates, but whatever he does, the world will never be the same.

We Shall Repeal the Twentieth Century

Mr. Trump has proven that it is possible to fight the regime and win; that you can talk about Mexican rapists and become president; that the media can wage total war against you and still be defeated; that you can use social media to speak to voters directly.

There is much to celebrate but there even more yet to be done. We in the West set aside the dawn of a New Year for reflection. Let us reflect on three lessons from 2016.

 

1) We are who we have been waiting for. This election shows that we need not wait for a catastrophe in order to work for our own interests. We can act now. Mr. Trump is an imperfect vessel for our aspirations, but his victory means that what was impossible has become possible. He instinctively feels the call of his people.
There have been other men who arose to fight dangers facing our nation. We have heroes from the past from who we draw inspiration, men such as Washington, Jefferson, and Lee. But white advocates also have a special pantheon of heroes. Here are some who should be our models.

Josiah Tattnall

Madison Grant

Lothrop Stoddard

Sam Francis

Philippe Rushton

 

2) Real news changes people’s minds. Ever since the election, the elite media have decried the “fake news” that reportedly duped voters. Of course, it was the very reverse. Some horrors were so stark even the mainstream could not cover them up:

Horrific Fate of South Carolina Teen Who Vanished Seven Years Ago: 17-Year-Old ‘Was Gang-Raped, Shot, and Fed to Alligators,’Daily Mail

Being Raped by a Gang Is Normal—It’s About Craving to Be Accepted,” Guardian

Protesters Punch, Throw Eggs at Trump Supporters in San Jose,” AP

Other sources were even more specific:

Why Milwaukee Burns,” City Journal

Black Lives Matter: Hysteria and Lies,” American Renaissance

There Are No Successful Black Nations,” Foreign Policy

It is now easier than ever for Americans to get past the pleasantries of “diversity is strength” and “we are a nation of immigrants.”

 

3) Elite contempt for whites brings people to our side. Donald Trump so infuriated the elites that they could no longer conceal what they think of us:

Lena Dunham Posts Video Celebrating the ‘Extinction of White Men’ on Twitter,” Breitbart

Activist: White People Should Kill Themselves to Atone for ‘White Privilege’Info Wars

Yes, Half of Trump Supporters Are Racist,” Washington Post

White Fragility” Is The New White Guilt Concept,Progressives Today

It’s Time to Stop Talking About Racism With White People,” Washington Post

Three lessons: We have the blood of heroes in our veins. The complete failure of the liberal project is clear. The increasingly obvious scorn our rulers feel for whites drives people into our camp.

This year was a breakthrough. In 2017, we must hold faith with the memory of our heroes, never lose sight of our goals, and work harder than ever.

 

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Chris Roberts
Chris Roberts is the former Director of Special Projects at American Renaissance.
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