Christians, women and gay men are among the groups of asylum seekers needing their own accommodation in Germany after facing attacks by fellow migrants.

In Stuttgart, 30 Christians have been moved into their own digs after frequent attacks by other migrant-seeking Muslim men.

Elsewhere gay men are being persecuted, and women, some who have been sexually abused by ISIS militants, have been moved to secret locations.

The group of Middle Eastern Christians in Stuttgart were moved into new homing after they had their bibles torn up and crucifixes smashed by fellow migrants.

The city council finally acted after a campaign group complained about the abuse and a petition signed by 17,000 people demanded they be better protected.

It said: ‘We call on the city to make it possible for them to have a communal place for Christians and protect them from further threats and attacks which they are suffering in the central gathering place for asylum seekers.’

The move was a significant one because until now Germany had been trying not to separate refugees on ethnic or religious lines.

The local evangelical church spokesman Stefan Walter said: ‘The Christian refugees come from lands where Christians are under threat.

‘Putting them all together is to ignore the right they have to protection, and is an insult to the victims of Islamic oppression.’

However, the violence shows no sign of dying down any stage soon.

Martin Lessenthin, the CEO of the International Society for Human Rights, said he knew of many similar conflicts in accommodations in Barton Wurttemberg, but also in Berlin and Nuremberg.

He claimed the abuse was mostly directed at Yazidis and Christians, adding the answer was to make everybody accept German law.

‘Ethnic or religious separation is not the answer, anyone who arrives here needs to follow German law in its entirety.’

The German government has also provided support accommodation at secret locations for female victims of ISIS.

Winfried Kretschmann, Baden Wurttemberg’s Minister-President, has a special program to help a total of 1,100 female victims of ISIS.

Klaus-Peter Murawski, the program’s co-ordinator, said the victims of sexual assault included one girl as young as eight.

The women, many of whom were Yazidis or Christians from northern Iraq and Syria, were sexually abused and beaten, and many of them were kept as slaves after being taken from their families.

In Lower Saxony, the region was the first to agree to take 70 women from a special allocation of refugees who cannot be placed in with other refugees.

And it also funded special psychological care and medical assistance for the women as a result of what they had experienced.

As well as non-Muslims and women, LGBT refugees are also now needing their own accommodation.

Jorg Steinert, managing director of the Lesbian and Gay Association in Berlin-Brandenburg, reported that since last year the number of attacks has skyrocketed.

He said: ‘In particular, small, petite, feminine gay men are often beaten or sexually assaulted.’

He said that as a result in Berlin and Nuremberg there are already separate places where they could be accommodated being made available and the first residents would be able to move in shortly.

There are also growing numbers of reports citing violence between the mostly Muslim groups that remain, with frequent police callouts to tackle the violence.

Recent incidents this week have seen pitched battles involving nail-studded planks and knives being used.

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