UPDATE: “Race Card Project” — Final Competition

Henry Wolff, American Renaissance, February 3, 2014

See which submissions were most popular.

Last month, inspired by a series by National Public Radio called the “Race Card Project,” we invited readers to submit haiku-like six-word statements about race. We were overwhelmed by the quantity and quality of the submissions–which, as you can imagine, were rather different in tone from those submitted to NPR. As always, we are impressed by the wit and insight of our readers.

Our “Race Card Project” got a total of 1,580 comments–easily a new record for an AmRen article!

A number of readers urged Jared Taylor and Henry Wolff to contribute statements, but we were so impressed by the quality of reader submissions that we beg off from the official competition. We did, however, exchange “race cards” as follows:

Wolff: “We could have gone to Mars.”

Taylor reply: “We could have stayed on Earth!”

We chose the 34 best submissions, based on reader upvotes and our our own preferences. Each of the 34 is its own “comment” below, and we invited readers to vote for their favorite(s). We offered the author of the winning submission three books from our store.

Based on the votes below, here are the runners-up:

“Tolerance is directly proportional to distance.” — Berserker, 87 upvotes

“Proximity to diversity cures white guilt.” — Jane Johnson, 90 upvotes

“Your race card is maxed out.” — Michael Christopher Scott, 95 upvotes

“White guilt is a social construct.” — bigone4u, 95 upvotes

And the winning “Race Card”:

“Whites create, Asians imitate, blacks desecrate.” — PvtCharlieSlate, 141 upvotes

PvtCharlieSlate, please send us a contact us with your address and the books you would like.

We hope all our readers have enjoyed this as much as we have.


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Henry Wolff
Henry Wolff is the assistant editor of American Renaissance.
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