{snip} Macy’s, unlike many other businesses (see Chipotle a/k/a “Sh-tpotle,” America’s largest illegal alien smuggling ring), went the extra mile to verify that its employees are here legally and eligible to work. But the Obama administration no likee that and went after Macy’s in a federal civil lawsuit filed by the Obama (in)Justice Department, which Macy’s just settled for $275,000 (nuisance money) and a whole lotta legal fees.

Yes, it’s not a lot of money for a major retailer, but only a few immigrant employees were involved and it’s a disturbing harbinger for how the Obama administration will actually “secure” the borders and the interior under amnesty, as in . . . NOT AT ALL. {snip}

Macy’s Inc. will pay a civil penalty of $175,000 to settle allegations the department-store operator engaged in unfair documentation practices against immigrant employees who had work authorizations during an eligibility reverification process, according to the Justice Department.

Under the settlement, the retailer agreed to create a $100,000 back-pay fund for individuals who lost wages or seniority as a result of the company’s employment eligibility reverification policies and procedures, which Macy’s agreed to revise. Also as part of the accord, Macy’semployment eligibility verification practices will be subject to monitoring and reporting requirements for two years.


According to the Justice Department, Macy’s employs 180,000 people in the U.S. The investigation stemmed from several calls to a worker hotline for potential immigration-related unfair-employment practices. Immigration law prohibits employers from treating workers differently in eligibility or reverification processes by demanding more or different documents, or by limiting the worker’s choice of documents, based on an individual’s immigration status or national origin.


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