Senate Approves Immigration Overhaul

Fox News, June 27, 2013

The Senate on Thursday approved a sweeping immigration overhaul that would extend legal status to millions of undocumented immigrants while increasing border security, sending the bill to the House side where it faces a chilly reception.

The vote caps weeks of bipartisan negotiations and hands President Obama, who has made immigration legislation the cornerstone of his second-term agenda, a partial victory.

The Senate voted 68-32 to approve the bill, following a series of test votes that already demonstrated the legislation had enough support to pass.

The question is whether the Senate vote can compel the Republican-led House to follow suit. Some Republicans have already declared the Senate bill “dead on arrival” in the House, but House lawmakers are working on their own piecemeal version of immigration legislation.

House Speaker John Boehner, who says both chambers should act on immigration, declined to say Thursday how his caucus would proceed.

“We’re going to go home for the recess next week and listen to our constituents,” he said. “And when we get back, we’re going to … have a discussion about the way forward.”

{snip}

All Democrats, in addition to 14 Republicans, voted for the legislation on Thursday. All “no” votes came from the Republican side of the aisle.

{snip}

At its core, the legislation in the Senate includes numerous steps to prevent future illegal immigration, while at the same time it offers a chance at citizenship to the 11 million immigrants now living in the country unlawfully.

It provides for 20,000 new Border Patrol agents, requires the completion of 700 miles of fencing and requires an array of high-tech devices to be deployed to secure the border with Mexico.

Businesses would be required to check on the legal status of prospective employees. Other provisions would expand the number of visas for highly skilled workers relied upon by the technology industry. A separate program would be established for lower-skilled workers, and farm workers would be admitted under a temporary program.

{snip}

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., called it “the mother of all amnesties.”

{snip}

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  • John Smith

    “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largess from the public treasury.

    From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising them the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that a democracy always collapses over loose fiscal policy….

    The world’s great civilizations have progressed through this sequence: From bondage to spiritual faith; from spiritual faith to great courage; from courage to liberty; from liberty to abundance; from abundance to selfishness; from selfishness to complacency; from complacency to apathy; from apathy to dependence; from dependence back again into bondage.”

    Alexander Tyler (ca.1770)

    • Mr Plankton

      Alexander Tytler. Small Correction but what a prophetic genius this man was. I would also like to point out that with the passage of the 14th amendment, the states could no longer prevent this type of garbage from passing. This country has been to hell since April 9, 1865. The sooner the federal government goes into the dustbin of history, the better. Thanks Abe.

      • JohnEngelman

        After April 9, 1865 the United States went on to become the strongest and richest country in the world.

        • Mr Plankton

          You are correct. At the expense of states rights and 800,000 lives lost, we became the strongest and richest. Now we are heading in the other direction, weaker, poorer, and a police state like federal government that spy’s on it own citizens, worships at the altar of the almighty negro and allows millions upon millions of third worlders to enjoy the largess from the public treasury. Sweet trade off.

          • IstvanIN

            The USSR was horrible but it was much more powerful than the Russian Empire that preceded it or the CIS that followed. Switzerland was never a world power and probably better off for it.

        • kjh64

          It did, for awhile but is quickly fading due to several of the things Mr.Tyler said.

        • 1gravity

          Define your terms.

        • Sick of it

          We were nearly at that point prior to the Civil War. They just used what resources and industry we already had…

          • JohnEngelman

            If the Confederacy had won the Civil War, or if it had been allowed to leave the United States without a fight the divided Union would have been less of a factor economically and militarily.

          • IstvanIN

            Or perhaps there would have been two great nations. Or more likely a North American “Brazil”-type nation in the south and an industrialized “Canada”-type in the north.

          • newscomments70

            What makes you think the North isnt like Brazil? Have you ever been to Cleveland, Newark, New York, Boston, or pretty much any medium size to large city in the North?

          • IstvanIN

            Did you read my comment? “would have”.

          • newscomments70

            I did read your comment. What I meant is that it already is like Brazil. If the same liberals developed the country independent of the South, I believe the same immigration patterns would be in place. It would still be the same. I don’t think the South would be like Brazil because it probably would have continued to be under white, male rule.

          • Sick of it

            Obviously, for a certain span of time. But we had a monstrous amount of land, resources, and ideas. We still would have ended up probably the two richest and most powerful nations in the world.

        • Bossman

          That is correct. It became a continental power. A continental power with still lots of room to grow bigger and stronger.

      • Luca

        I find 1964 -1965 to be the turning point in modern times. Viet Nam, the War on Poverty, Voting Rights Act, Social Security Amendments, Civil Rights Act, the Immigration Act and all likewise legislation authored mainly by Liberals and intended to sound nice and wreak havoc. I think LBJ has done more to destroy the Euro-American culture than any other President, although clearly we have yet see the worst that BO has to offer..

        • Mr Plankton

          I agree, in modern times; sure, 1965 was the turning point. However, none of this would be occurring if the states had not been stripped of their sovereignty after 1865. I’m not looking to re-fight the civil war, I’m just pointing out that federalism died after 1865 and led to this pretense of federalism which we have today.

        • Sick of it

          The socialist garbage pushed by Roosevelt certainly did not help, nor did it help that several generations thereafter have expected government involvement in every aspect of our lives.

    • The__Bobster

      From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising them the most benefits from the public treasury
      _________

      In this case, it’s a small minority that is selling us out. The majority don’t want amnesty for the ugly brown squat monster invaders.

    • JohnEngelman

      Apprehensions about the durability of democracy expressed during the eighteenth century have not been borne out out by experience. Since Alexander Tyler said that democratic governments have spread throughout the world.

      • IstvanIN

        be honest, how many have been stable for as long as the US and the UK? Few.

        • JohnEngelman

          France has a good record, as to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. After a country has maintained a democratic government for three generations that government is fairly stable.

          • IstvanIN

            France? They are on their fifth republic with some Napoleons and restorations thrown in. Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are recent out-growths of the UK. The rest of the world not so much.

          • Camielle Belle Poole

            LOL…No…France is a horrible example. They are notoriously unstable in their government. Their current set up is doing alright, but for how long? Pick another.

          • David Ashton

            Representative democracy suits some cultures/nations/races better than others. It can be subverted by various interests, such as candidate funding, and its opponents, such as the marxists, have often employed the semantics of “democracy” as a tactic for its overthrow. The philosophy of good government is far too big a subject for snippets here. The best system is one in which individuals and families can enjoy “the good life” a state that oppresses them or alternatively a state which cannot protect them from crime or invasion.

          • JohnEngelman

            The best system for a black majority seems to be benevolent paternalism by whites. When blacks accept that, as in the Caribbean, the results are not too horrible. When they reject that the results are horrible. Either the whites become tyrannical and cruel, or they are overthrown with results that have been described on American Renaissance.

            The problem of plutocratic campaign spending can be solved, as it has been in many first world democracies, buy government financing of campaigns.

            The only established democracy I am aware of that was overthrown by Communists was Czechoslovakia. The Soviet Army occupied Czechoslovakia at the time.

            You could add Russia to the list, but Russia had a weak tradition of democracy going back only to 1905, and Russia had been devastated by World War I.

          • David Ashton

            “Democracy” has been a universal slogan of Marxist-Leninists whatever the targeted nation or form of government. Their largely – not entirely – fallacious “class analysis” holds that parliament is a fraudulent cover for capitalist rule. Lenin closed the Constituent Assembly in Russia when the popular vote went against him.

          • JohnEngelman

            The Bolshevik seizure of power in Russia was nothing more or less than a coup by an armed and well organized minority during a time when Russia was in chaos.

            Bertrand Russell and I.F.Stone were on the left. In one of his writings Bertrand Russell said that the Soviet Union was, “the greatest example of organized, systematic hypocrisy the world has ever known.”

            Before returning home from a visit to the Soviet Union I.F.Stone summarized his impression of the U.S.S.R by writing, “This is not a good society, and it is not run by honest men.”

          • David Ashton

            According to his biographers old Izzy Pancake changed his attitude to the USSR back and forth during his lifetime.

          • JohnEngelman

            That is because I.F. Stone had a mind that was open to new facts.

          • David Ashton

            Lenin bad, Stalin good, Stalin bad, Lenin good….!

          • JohnEngelman

            I mainly respect I.F. Stone as an anti war journalist during the War in Vietnam.

          • David Ashton

            In June 1933 Izzy Feinstein said a “Soviet America” would be a good option for its workers, and during the Great Purge years he was a minor “asset” codenamed Pancake for Stalin’s overseas espionage apparatus. My guess is that he was basically an “anti-fascist” and that because of threatened Jewish heritage. During the Vietnam war he was not a pacifist so much as a fellow-traveller of the communist warmakers.

            There were many more eminent “anti-communists” you could have quoted than old Stone (or even the brilliant Lord Russell). But I am probably boring readers with this little digression of detail, and boring our readers is not something you would ever do, is it?

          • JohnEngelman

            I never read anything by I.F. Stone in support of Stalin. I am confident that he changed his mind about Stalin by the time I was reading his Bi Weekly during the War in Vietnam.

            Like many Americans during the War in Vietnam he probably thought that North Vietnam was the lesser to two evils. What mattered was that the United States was devastating a country to prevent the ascension of a leader as many as 80 percent of the Vietnamese supported.

            If you want, click on my avatar. You will find my e-mail address. We can continue this conversation off line.

          • David Ashton

            Thank you, but no.

      • John Smith

        Yet they are observed to be following Tyler’s cycle nonetheless.

        • JohnEngelman

          Please give several examples. In the Scandinavian countries, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand domestic spending is more generous than in the United States, but no serious observer expects any of those governments to be overthrown by dictatorships.

          • evilsandmich

            I think that you might be proceeding from an opinion of democracy=freedom.

          • JohnEngelman

            “Freedom” has various definitions and interpretations. Republicans and libertarians see freedom from the viewpoint of employers. What they see as freedom can be seen as arbitrary power by employees.

            Also, we are discussing Alexander Tyler’s 1770 assertion, “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largess from the public treasury.”

            My point, using Scandinavia, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand as my evidence, is that there is no indication that a democratic government that manages a generous public sector of the economy paid for by steeply progressive taxation is unstable.

      • John Smith

        Political ideologies have swept the globe and then receded or collapsed with historic repetition. I’m not against democracy but rather pointing out one of many weaknesses with the system that must be guarded against and guess what, most of Western Civilization has not done a good job of guarding against them. In fact, they’ve done such a poor job since the rise of modern “progressive” liberalism, that we can actually see Alexander’s theory taking form.

        You appear to be quite eclectic in your views and myopic in your example selections but I’m not. I look at the West’s failing societies, failing education systems, failing economies and rapidly rising national debts and know they have allowed the inherent weaknesses associated with Democracy to transform their nations into ticking time bombs.

        What do you think will happen when the national debt reaches $50 trillion, the public education system is in the bottom 25% of industrialized nations no matter how much money we throw at it, society/government has become more corrupt, the common culture fractured to the point of balkanization, etc…

        Trends are very important in forecasting. You appear to be completely oblivious of both the trends occurring and the fact that they lead to real life consequences.

    • Romulus

      Unfortunately,you are quite right for the most part. This has happened to all the western republics all the way back to Greece. Republic,democracy, socialism, collapse. The difference in Russia was monarchy,social commie revolution, collapse. To put it mildly.

      • Sick of it

        More than a revolution. Reading literature from the time has really opened my eyes to how much the people of Russia had changed in their worldview by the time the revolution, or civil war if you prefer, finally started in Tsarist Russia. Thus I’m really creeped out by what our children and young adults are being taught in the U.S. today.

      • John Smith

        Yes. But not before the state atheists showed how murderously intolerant and devoid of transcendent goodies they really are.

    • connorhus

      As a nation we have already hit the loose fiscal policy ceiling. They are getting through the ceiling with the Fed and non-accountability. In a sense we are on new ground and how firm it is, is the big question.

    • David Ashton

      As someone long interested in the rise and fall of nations and civilizations, I can say that the sequences, spirals and cycles have been noted by many wise observers from antiquity to recent times. This one perhaps most closely resembles LeBon’s conclusion to “The Crowd”. The connection between “decline” and dysgenic breeding plus rapid demographic change is perhaps of most concern to us here. For the USA an immigration moratorium and an internal humanitarian eugenics policy would be a way forward, though this is politically contra mundum. We have at least a chance through modern science to overcome Spengler’s view that the west is locked in the trap of irreversible fatality – the “Faustian” factor is precisely what distinguishes us from the Classical models to which he was too imaginatively attached a hundred years ago.

      • Bossman

        Europe declined because America rose. Power shifted to the periphery. If you’re going to talk about the “West,” you should realize that Western civilization is now Global civilization. Hence, no decline of Western civilization.

        • David Ashton

          Spengler would have agreed about the power shift from Europe to America and then “globalization”.
          I do not wish to be drawn into semantic debate. I remain concerned about the survival and progress of my own people who are white and mostly English-speaking.

          • Bossman

            English is quite safe and secure because it is now the international language. White people will always be around because all the colored races want to be white.

          • David Ashton

            Your first sentence has no bearing on my definition of my own people, primarily the English of my own ancestral homeland and secondly their racial relatives in north America, Australia, New Zealand and Europe. Incidentally, the numbers whose language is Spanish or Chinese are quite considerable.

            The second sentence is bizarre: if all the colored races who wish to lighten the skin color of their descendants cross with whites, the relative number of actual whites will decline. As the distinguished geneticist and historian Professor Cyril Darlington put it, “Is there not then a third system, one of wider outbreeding, of real crossing, such as black-by-white? The answer is no…. The original types from which you started will never reappear: one can never recover the parental strain from the offspring of a wide cross” (“The New Scientist”, April 14, 1960).

            The important thing is for white people, from England to Estonia, to increase their reproductive rate for general benefit.

      • JohnEngelman

        For the record, I think some races are superior to others. That belief is what I consider to be the essence of race realism.

        David Ashton,

        I am sure you have studied the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Those who blame that fall on dysgenic race mixing should keep in mind that the racial influx into the Empire was of Germanic peoples. It was not of Negroes, or even of Semitics.

        • David Ashton

          I have noted but not yet read several recent diverse studies of the fall of the western Roman empire. I have immediately to hand only Gibbon, Cary’s “History of Rome” whose final chapter reviews various causes of decline, and Kagan’s collection of essays (including Tenney Frank’s “Race Mixture”). Several combined factors were no doubt responsible in different degrees. Ethnic pluralism (e.g. in army recruitment and slavery) undermined cohesion. There are still probably lessons for us today.

          Dysgenic breeding does not necessarily entail crossing with different immigrant races, though there were non-Germanic peoples in Rome. The Nordic invasions possibly contributed to a long-term revival that resulted in the subsequent civilization of Europe.

  • Manaphy

    Hardly any surprise here. but hopefully it will die in the house. Please, please, please call your respective representatives and scare the hell out of them into not supporting the mother of all amnesties.

    • Eagle_Eyed

      Logically it would. With midterms coming up, any Repub who votes against those who elected him by accepting amnesty should be toast. We’ll see.

    • 1gravity

      Scare might be too strong a word. Tell your representative how you feel, and why. Threatening a federal legislator with adverse consequences of any kind is too dicey.

      • Sick of it

        While we fear them and not the other way around…this is a tyranny.

      • Manaphy

        By “scare”, I meant that if a congressman gets repeated nonstop calls from his constituents, he would likely start to fear his job if he goes against them, so he will put his own opinions to the side and vote with his constituents because he knows that it is in his interest to keep his job. Of course if you do call your Representative, and I sincerely hope that you do, you shouldn’t sound angry or mean-spirited, just calmly tell them that you are against amnesty, and that you won’t vote for them if they support Senate Bill S. 744

    • NM156

      The House won’t vote on it. The House GOP is laughing about S744.

    • mobilebay

      Wouldn’t it be great if our elected reps would do the right thing simply because it WAS right and not have to be begged, threatened or paid off?

  • The__Bobster

    Even notice how Democrats have 100% solidarity on nation-destroying measures?

    • JackKrak

      Yep. In fact, there is no internal debate at all within the Democratic party. It’s as if they move in lockstep according to commands received from the mothership. Occasionally, there might be a holdout or two on particular bill but that’s only because they’re trying to squeeze more goodies from Uncle Sam Claus before giving their vote.

      • Sick of it

        I think it’s because, despite the varied nature of the groups supporting the Democratic party, all of them are equally interested in destroying the United States Constitution. They are all interested in getting rid of capitalism. All of them are interested in collectivization. All of them support the United Nations and so-called international law. All of them, despite their claims, are strongly anti-Christian.

  • All Democrats voted for it. Including Claire McCaskill and Joe Donnelly. Remember, back in 2007, in her first year in the Senate, McCaskill was an immigration patriot. I wondered back then whether it was her true blue beliefs or just a pure partisan reaction to the President pushing amnesty being a “Republican.” Now we know the answer, that it was the latter. And Joe Donnelly (Indiana) was another one that has just exposed himself as a fraud: Remember, even V-Dare was touting this guy and his big time B+ lifetime grade from Numbers USA from his time in Congress as proof that no matter who won in Indiana, either Richard Mourdock or Donnelly, we were cool on immigration. Well, fail that, and now I’m starting to wonder if Numbers USA grades mean all that much.

    The Republicans who voted for it, fourteen of them in all:

    Alexander (TN)
    Ayotte (NH)
    Chiesa (NJ)
    Collins (ME)
    Corker (TN)
    Flake (AZ)
    Hatch (UT)
    Graham (SC)
    Heller (NV)
    Hoeven (ND)
    Kirk (IL)
    McCain (AZ)
    Murkowski (AK)
    Rubio (FL)

    Surprises: Alexander (TN) voted against cloture but for the final bill, and Wicker (MS) voted for cloture but against the final bill. The two Georgia open borders heads, Chambliss and Isakson, voted no. I guess at least in those cases, all our phone calls made a difference. What surprises me is that the total number of yes votes wasn’t closer to 60, as I was fully expecting more of those who voted for cloture to vote against the final bill for outward appearances, as they knew it had at least 60 votes anyway.

    And also, Rand Paul’s no vote is the functional equivalent of a yes. He has made it clear the only reason he voted no was because Gang Bangers of Eight didn’t swing the borders open widely enough nor grant as many work permits and grant them quickly enough for his tastes.

    I’m sure the media, the Razatards and the EL CHEAPO labor lobby will now try to pressure the House to pass a bill, because, we can’t say no to a bill that got 68 Senate votes. Even though it only got 14 of the 46 Republicans and no Democrats broke party ranks; I fail to see how that should impress House Republicans. My recommendation to House Republicans is not to do anything, don’t pass any kind of bill, even a good one. For a good bill would go to conference with this bad bill that the Senate passed, and as you know, when you mix turds and ice cream…

  • JohnEngelman

    At its core, the legislation in the Senate includes numerous steps to prevent future illegal immigration, while at the same time it offers a chance at citizenship to the 11 million immigrants now living in the country unlawfully.

    – Fox News, June 27, 2013

    This is comparable to letting everyone out if prison while telling potential criminals, “Please obey the law.”

    • Sick of it

      This is why I’ve tried warning people I know about Fox News. They seriously tow the line.

    • Bossman

      That is not a good analogy at all. The bill will do much to prevent future illegal entry and will cut much of chain migration.

      • JohnEngelman

        The best way to prevent future illegal entry is to punish previous illegal entry, and to punish the employers of illegals.

        • Bossman

          That solution is not working and hasn’t worked in the past to solve the problem.

          • Greg Thomas

            It’s “not working” because very few in our government are trying to make it work. If they spent as much time deporting illegal invaders as they do pushing amensty, we might see a different result.

        • Camielle Belle Poole

          Oh no! We have to reward them with citizenship because they are only trying to escape poverty in their home countries due to corrupt governments who won’t take care of their own!

      • Greg Thomas

        Like what?

    • David Ashton

      It’s started in “England”. Nadhim Zahawi, a “Conservative” MP, wants all illegal immigrants to be granted amnesty (“The Independent”, June 28, p.14).

  • Matt

    I wonder if any of these liberals who support amnesty would also grant the same right to a thug who breaks into their houses and establishes himself there as an uninvited guest. This thug eats their food, sleeps in their beds, and uses their toiletry items while very seldom (if ever) contributing anything himself (rent, household chores, etc.). And to top things off, this same thug often smuggles food and household items to his thuggish friends who are out in the cold. I can’t imagine liberals putting up with this themselves in their own insulated corners of America, yet they feel they can shove it upon the country as a whole without feeling the least bit guilty or hypocritical.

  • Jesse James

    Thank you to Georgia’s Senators Saxby Chambliss and Johnny Isackson for listening to their constituents and voting NO on S.744. Georgian’s are already getting kicked in the teeth by a flood of illegal immigrants who are holding down wages and making employment opportunities more difficult for legal citizens to find. I just wish those other fourteen traitors get turned out during their next election cycle.

    • Sick of it

      Every state is having this problem now.

  • kjh64

    “That’s how it is with liberalism. Liberals make everyone else suffer with their degenerate policies just so they can feel righteous in the safety of their own communities”

    This sums it up in a nutshell.

  • kjh64

    Before the House vote, everyone needs to contact the senators involved, either by phone or e-mail. This legislation, if passed, could very likely destroy America economically and as a first world nation. Go to FAIR(Federation for American Immigration Reform), they have petitions and contacts of politicians.

  • Dave4088

    The border security provisions are merely words on paper and won’t be acted upon. This bill will legalize some 30 million illegals and everyone who overstayed their visa and we will still have an illegal immigration problem to boot.

    The countdown to the Brazilification of America and browning out of the white race has officially begun.

    • Sick of it

      The language in the bill allows Big Sister to choose whether or not the border security provisions are needed. So obviously she will decline to follow them.

      • kjh64

        She(Napolitano) will not follow them Obama and the federal government do not want her too. The government does not want to secure the border and never did.

  • DLRisVH

    Unfortunately this is quickly becoming a no country for Caucasians.

    • ricpic

      So when do whites get serious about separation? I have no idea how to start but if not now when? It will only get worse. And at warp speed. The area from the Dakotas through Wyoming, Montana and Idaho to eastern Washington and Oregon is still overwhelmingly white. What is needed is a leader. This will probably sound perverse: I am hoping for a catastrophic economic implosion. Yes, the suffering will be immense. That’s the point. The pressure generated by such suffering may act as a catalyst to action. Nothing short of that seems to have done the trick.

      • IstvanIN

        As sad as that would be I believe you are right, only a massive, nation-wide catastrophe will wake Americans (real Americans) up.

        • connorhus

          Agreed. Now if it would just start moving a bit faster because it is already in the works.

      • Ella

        I heard too much attention is placed upon Federal level but separation would start really on a State level. Of course the State will be “starved” financially and all federal funds removed promptly. Ron Paul talked about the possibility of States to challenge the Feds. and reclaim lost jurisdiction or powers of that State.

  • Dave4088

    No sooner than the ink dries on this nation killing legislation will we be treated to a laundry list of demands by these new “citizens”. And the stupid party will get on their hands and knees. Again.

    The white majority officially has no political representation and will have to consider other means to secure a future on this continent.

  • IstvanIN

    “I hate rebels, I hate traitors, I hate tyranny come from where it will. I have seen much of the world, and I have learnt from experience to hate and detest republics. There is nothing but tyranny & oppression, I have never known a good act done by a Republican, it is contrary to his character under the mask of Liberty. He is a tyrant, a many headed monster that devours your happiness and property. Nothing is free from this monster’s grasp. A republic has no affection for its subjects. A King may be ill advised and act wrong, a Republic never acts right, for a knot of villains support each other, and together they do what no single person dare attempt.”

    -Lord Horatio Nelson

  • NM156

    “Perhaps the one thing that’s certain about the House of Representatives and immigration is that the bill that just passed the Senate could never, ever pass the House. Indeed, it’s difficult to overstate how little regard Republicans there have for it, even with the border-security amendment added by Senators Bob Corker and John Hoeven.“Just like all the senators, I haven’t read it yet,” quips Representative Tim Huelskamp of Kansas. The House should “fold it up into a paper airplane and throw it out the window. Oh, is that not the right answer?” jokes Representative Mick Mulvaney of South Carolina. “The Senate is, at this point, irrelevant,” observes Representative Ted Poe of Texas, the chairman of the House immigration caucus.”

    • Sue

      I read ” House Immigration Circus”. I do hope you’re right.

      • NM156

        Read the article.

    • It’s good they won’t pass the Senate bill. But what’s even more crucial is that they don’t pass any bill. For any bill the House passes, even if its 110% of what we want, will have to be compromised with the Senate bill, and then whatever the compromise bill will have to be voted on as is by both chambers. The bill that would come out of conference committee wouldn’t be good for us, because Reid would appoint the Senate negotiators, and Boehner (open borders) would appoint the House negotiators (who would be all open borders RINOs.)

      • NM156

        We have to keep on them of course, but all indicators are that it will die. The majority of Reps don’t want the stench of amnesty anywhere near them going into 2014, an election year for many of them.

    • Bossman

      Are House Republicans paid to do nothing? They will have to do something.

      • NM156

        Any House bill proposal can fall apart. House members know why they are there, which in a large number of districts, is specifically to stop an amnesty. If a bill does come out of the House, it will be similar to the 06/07 bill, which the Senate won’t have.

  • Xerxes22

    It looks like we will have to reserve sixtyeight lamposts for a future necktie party.

  • IstvanIN

    The point of the quote was how a republic has no affection for its subjects. As is quite in evidence from our own experience.

    As for today’s monarchs, they have no real power, and if they do exercise the little power they have left, the politicians, as in Luxemburg and The Netherlands, quickly take it away. Mind you, not the public by referendum, but the politicians. A clearly written constitution, giving a monarch limited but well defined powers, that is difficult to amend, and only with broad public approval, might provide a defense against the politicians.

    A man can love, an institution can not.

    • connorhus

      I would disagree that a Constitutional Republic does care about the citizens. The problem is we now have a democracy of mob rule.

  • IstvanIN

    “I filed an amendment that would have corrected one of the most egregious aspects of the gang of eight bill as it intersects with Obamacare legislation, namely a penalty imposed on U.S. employers for hiring U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents. This bill says if an employer hires a citizen or a legal immigrant, the IRS can impose a $5,000 penalty on that employer. But if the employer instead hires someone with RPI status, that penalty will go away. That is utterly and completely indefensible.” Ted Cruz.

    • Very good. Everyone should read this, and then re-read it 50 times. The Zuckerberg-Gates funded ads on talk radio and Fox Noise Channel brag about how no illegals or legalized illegals will be eligible for ObamaCare. The dirty little secret in that is that that will be an incentive (by deliberate design, IMHO), for employers to hire the newly work permitted heretofore illegals instead of native born white Americans.

      • itdoesnotmatter

        Question Diversity, California illegals can and do receive gratis medical care. All one has to do is present him/herself, or one of his 10 kids, to an E.R. and voila, “indigent” care is given. The illegal is then registered for Medicaid benefits. Compliments of taxpayers, of course.

        • IstvanIN

          Same in NJ.

          • itdoesnotmatter

            Squatters will bring us down. That is the left’s plan, though isn’t it? I see the devolving scenario all around me. Whole neighborhoods trashed, almost overnight. Our E.R. waiting room packed with brown squat monsters not needing emergency care, insured whites waiting 5 hours to be triaged, let alone, seen.

        • Bossman

          “Indigent Care” is very inferior to those that can pay. E.R is just about the worst kind of care that you can get.

          • ms_anthro

            Good.

  • WR_the_realist

    Both of my senators voted for it, including alleged Republican Kelly Ayotte. It doesn’t only give 11 million illegal immigrants amnesty. It adds a total of 33 million green cards over the next 10 years, with a vast increase in H1b workers. Millions of American citizens will be put out of a job by that bill. I will actively work for her opponent in the primaries.

  • Greg Thomas

    Therefore, we have 68 traitors in the Senate I see. They should all be publically shunned. Of course, the illegal invaders on hand to cheer this poison all chanted “si pude si.” We are being invaded and those who voted for this treason are aiding and abetting this invasion.

    • George White

      You’re not going to believe this, but I’ll mention it anyway. When I was teaching here in Los Angeles, the students would taunt me and say, “We’re invading your country old white man! Haha! Nothing you can do about it!”

      Can you imagine? It’s a wonder I didn’t just strangle one of them. The abuse was beyond anything that anyone here would believe.

      • Ella

        I believe you. I knew Hispanics that bragged about constantly coming until our Govt. stops them. Nothing will as it seems.

      • Greg Thomas

        Perhaps Mr. La Raza bossman would care to comment on your experience. He’s quick to remind us what a blessing these parasites are.

  • these 68 traitors should be indicted, tried, convicted and punished for treason

  • NM156

    We’ll raise hell anyway, but the House does, in fact, intend to drop it. Telling the public that they have no allies creates apathy.

  • NM156

    BONER won’t bring any bill to the floor without majority (R) support.

  • Ella

    I don’t know if it is White people or educated, comfortable Middle Class -White or not. We’re not a “brainwashed” group and can cause serious problems. They want us at slave level.

  • Bossman

    It is about doing the nation’s business. Immigration reform needs to happen. I cannot imagine the House not producing a bill.

  • Bossman

    In most other countries, there are pathways to legal residency for an unauthorized immigrant.

    • David Ashton

      Let the burglar share the home.

  • Bossman

    Mexico ignores their unauthorized immigrants. They don’t have the resources to go after every immigrant. Even Canada ignores illegal immigrants.

    • Greg Thomas

      Another whooper from our resident La Raza disciple. I almost got thrown in jail by a mexican customs’ agent, for traveling through mexico without a current tourista card. Lucky for me, mexico is a corrupt country. The agent said he would handle the “paperwork” for a measly $40 bucks.

  • mobilebay

    Tell me, how long before these illegals….excuse me…these fine, upstanding, about-to-be citizens, get to vote?

    • Camielle Belle Poole

      Immediate. Then our President can be Mexican! OLE!

  • mobilebay

    Stentorian, you stirred a memory. Did Paulette Goddard also star in that movie along with Bob Hope? And did someone play an organ that opened a secret door? That’s the only scene I recall.

  • Ella

    Actually, you’re right but some States receive back more from the Feds than what they pay in and also works in reverse such as CA. CA actually pays in more–$2 for every $1 returned. (CA residents told me this.) If a large economy State like CA or TX tries to leave the union, the Feds will lose too much tax monies and use force in my opinion, but if AZ keeps up their good works, it may be different being a gentle start. Of course the Feds try to sue AZ broke.

  • NM156

    He’s a quisling, but stabbing the party in the back by ignoring the House rule requiring majority-party majority to move a bill forward will cost him his position as speaker. He knows this. If any bill originates in the House, it will look like the one the House produced in 06/07, which, of course, will go nowhere with the Senate. Nevertheless, he needs to be kept on a short leash. One look at his son-in-law will tell you he’s a kook who couldn’t care less about the interests of his own kind.

  • WR_the_realist

    That sounds like how the even more horrid John McCain won his last senate election. During the primaries he put out some anti-illegal immigration ads and said, “Build that fence!”. Of course he had been a sponsor of the previous 2007 amnesty bill. His primary opponent really was against illegal immigration. But voters have short memories and McCain was sent to the senate again. Now his voters are angry that he sponsored this amnesty. They have no one to blame but themselves.

    • David Ashton

      An empire of lies.

  • John Smith

    It is happening in real time. You’re just not observant enough to see it occurring.

    Your fascinating myopic obsession with Scandinavian countries might be part of your problem as it seems to have prevented you from observing the rest of the world.

    I’m well aware of the failings of neo-conservative economics just as I’m well aware of the failings of liberal economics.