The Stunning 335-Page Mega Report That Reveals the Radical Curriculum at One American College

Mytheos Holt, The Blaze, April 8, 2013

Bowdoin College, an elite university located in Maine, has recently found itself the nexus of a massive influx of controversy.

{snip}

Bowdoin President Barry Mills reportedly engaged in a golf game during the summer of last year with philanthropist and investor Thomas Klingenstein who, while not being a graduate of Bowdoin, was himself interested in the college’s approach to education. The result was an apparently awkward conversation during which Klingenstein complained of Bowdoin’s excessive celebration of “racial and ethnic difference,” in his words, rather than of “common American identity.”

It is unclear precisely how sharp the conversation got, but it evidently distressed Mills enough that he decided to mention Klingenstein (albeit not by name) in his subsequent commencement address as a particularly unpleasant golfing partner who’d interrupted his backswing to spout racist platitudes.

Needless to say, Klingenstein found this response galling. What he decided to do about it, however, is almost certainly unprecedented: Klingenstein decided to commission researchers to do an academic report on Bowdoin’s culture, both academically and outside the classroom, to see just what the college was teaching its students. The result was a 355 page report by the conservative National Association of Scholars that systematically broke down Bowdoin’s entire culture and worldview with extreme frankness. TheBlaze took a look at this report, and spoke to one of its authors, and you may be alarmed at the results.

What did that report find? That Bowdoin College, and indeed most of its peers in the elite liberal arts college community, is in fact:

A) Obsessed with identity politics to the point of using them as an excuse to teach irrelevant and/or trivial courses, and to admit underqualified and undereducated students

B) At once entirely unconcerned with fostering healthy sexual behavior in students and consumed with making sure they follow inconsistent and ideologically motivated norms; and

C) Disingenuous in their purported support for critical thinking, which only extends as far as thinking critically about topics which the college finds institutionally inconvenient

{snip}

A) Identity Politics

National Review’s Eliana Johnson, another reader of the report, summarized a few of its highlights on this point in an article last week:

The report documents an increasingly fractured academy that has no common curriculum and in which so-called identity studies take priority over a study of the West. It highlights, for example, the 36 freshmen seminars offered at Bowdoin in the fall of 2012. They are designed to teach writing and critical-thinking skills and to introduce students to the various academic departments. Some of the subjects are unsurprising: The Korean War, Great Issues in Science, Political Leadership. Others seem less conducive to critical thinking and fruitful classroom discussion: Queer Gardens, Beyond Pocahontas: Native American Stereotypes; Sexual Life of Colonialism; Modern Western Prostitutes.

Queer Gardens, an exploration of the work of gay and lesbian gardeners and of “the link between gardens and transgression,” simply “does not teach critical thinking as well as Plato’s Republic,” the report notes; nor does any subject that has “no canon of works that embody exemplary achievement in the difficult dialogic task of critical thinking.”

To many observers, such information might itself seem demonstrative. Yet the evidence goes beyond even these scattered examples. For example, in the section of the report that deals with distributional requirements, the authors observe:

When Bowdoin adopted the 2004 version of its distribution requirements, it took care to also provide a fuller rationalization for them than had been the case in previous iterations. In the new redaction the requirements were linked to a programmatic commitment to the ideal of “diversity,” which was in turn given a prominent place in the college’s new statement, “A Liberal Education at Bowdoin College.” Diversity serves an interesting function in the search for an underlying principle to give “coherence” to both the requirements and cohesion to the larger curriculum. It gives a warrant for politicization while at the same time frees faculty members, departments, and students to go their own ways. In effect, the elevation of diversity to the level of governing principle institutionalizes the incoherence that it ostensibly corrects. As far as divergent departmental interests go, it is an agree-to-disagree arrangement that demands very little of anyone other than deference to one of the shibboleths of the Left.

{snip}

Nor does this concern with presumptively underrepresented subject material or peoples stop in the classroom. The report’s section on Academic Preparedness recounts several faculty members agonizing over how affirmative action admits are academically ill-prepared for the university’s rigor, in spite of their professed commitment to “diversity.” In fact, the college apparently provides surreptitious extra help to these students to prop them up through their tenure at Bowdoin, in spite of their publicly professed belief that diversity and academic standards are not at odds. The report notes:

In the Minutes of the Faculty, the “underpreparedness” of students is most emphatically linked with the college’s pursuit of racial diversity. This probably reflects a genuine gap in the level of academic performance of black students and members of other racially-defined segments of the student population. That is not something, however, that we can document, and even if true it might disguise a larger problem. “Majority” students may generally perform better than black students, but majority students may also be “underprepared” in significant ways. Indeed, that’s what the data nationwide attests, and there is small reason to think that Bowdoin is an exception.

{snip}

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  • khesanh67-68

    Interesting. I think these worms feel a bit of pressure building. When these academics started their propaganda many years ago, they never envisioned it all turning against them.

  • Tom_in_Miami

    I don’t get it. Aren’t schools rated by how well their undergraduates do on GREs and further study at the graduate level? It would seem to me that the college is cutting its own throat by offering popular tripe instead of time tested classics in it’s undergraduate curriculum. What happens when word gets around that the typical student graduating from this institution or a similar one is unlikely to know who Plato was, or for that matter how to do a long division problem?

    • Nathanwartooth

      Has anyone else taken the GRE?

      I scored 79th percentile in verbal reasoning, 72nd percentile in analytical writing and 40th percentile in math. But I didn’t study for the math part at all and I am thinking about taking it again and studying for the math part.

      When I was applying for graduate school they told me that these percentiles were not good enough.

      Does anyone know which percentile you have to be in be considered high scoring enough?

      • The Final Solution

        Study abroad. You won’t have to take the GRE. I never took the SAT either and I’m starting a Ph.D program in the fall. Apply to schools in Northern Europe – the tuition is free for graduate/postgraduates.

      • pcmustgo

        I was 95th+ percentile on the SATS.

      • Cato

        Depends on your field. 40th percentile in math is abysmally low for anyone considering the hard sciences or Economics. It would be an OK score for someone considering English or History.

      • Riley DeWiley

        Depends. What color are you?

      • bigone4u

        I was applying for grad schools too many years ago to be able to say anything definitive. I applied to four, was admitted to two, and received support money from the one I attended. I graduated and had a successful 30 year career in higher ed. Schools vary in quality and reputation with the less picky ones more prone to let you in. For example, Lamar University in Beaumont Texas probably admits students with scores that would be unacceptable at Univ of Texas at Austin (the big flagship). I thought most schools stated in their catalog the minimum acceptable scores. You should be able to find that info in print; if not ask the dean of the college you are applying to what they consider acceptable.

      • Michael_C_Scott

        I took the GRE, but that was back in 1988.

    • Andy

      All that matters in academia is being a liberal. Unless you’re going for a degree in math/ science, opinion’s all you need to advance (as long as you’re not a white male, I hear).

    • E_Pluribus_Pluribus

      Colleges and Universities are rated by the quality of their admitted students (high SATs, GPAs, etc). Unfortunately, they are decided NOT rated by the quality of instruction, that,is, by what their students learn. . There is no pre- and post-testing, which is exactly the way the “higher” education empires want it.

      We do know, however, that today’s college graduates are less proficient than yesterday’s college graduates:

      “The average American college graduate’s literacy in English declined significantly over the past decade….When the test was last administered, in 1992, 40 percent of the nation’s college graduates scored at the proficient level, meaning that they were able to read lengthy, complex English texts and draw complicated inferences. But on the 2003 test, only 31 percent of the graduates demonstrated those high-level skills.”*

      *Literacy Falls for Graduates From College, Testing Finds [excerpts]
      By SAM DILLON
      New York Times
      December 16, 2005

      • pcmustgo

        I attended a top 25 university. It wasn’t super politically correct at all, but like most, students were liberal, but not aggressively so. Too busy partying and such to even care.

        That being said, I truly cannot thing of one new thing I learned there that I didn’t already know going in. Seriously.

        College is just something people “need” to have to get a good job.

        • pcmustgo

          Ok, maybe I learned like 2 new concepts thinking of it. Things I could have learned about by spending maybe 20 minutes reading 2 articles online.

          • concernedcollegekid

            This has been essentially my entire experience so far. I wish I felt like there was a better alternative for me that didn’t feel so pointless…

          • Bad_Mr_Frosty

            I dropped out of college because it was such a toxic environment. I was sick of constantly getting into arguments with my professors and being around students that had no place in an institute of higher learning.

            I can’t say I recommend leaving. If I had it to do over again, I would have gone for an associates degree in something very practical (EMT, X-Ray technician) rather than a 4-year degree in biology.

      • Colleges and Universities are rated by the quality of their admitted students (high SATs, GPAs, etc).

        Colleges have been lying about these numbers for decades.

        http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=crmas&p=colleges+lie+about+admitted+students+scores

  • dd121

    I am shocked and bewildered! Who would have thought that Bowdoin College would be a hotbed of leftist, communist thought.

    • The__Bobster

      Very few colleges aren’t.

      • edie

        I chuckle every time my alma mater sends me a form letter asking for alumni support in the form of cold cash………… hahahahahaha not frickin’ likely you manly-girls who would rule the world…….bwahahahahaha

  • sbuffalonative

    Well, turning on a light does make the cockroaches scatter.

    Queer Gardens, Beyond Pocahontas

    Keep exposing this foolishness until they understand how foolish they really are.

    • The__Bobster

      Start telling the parents what they’re paying for, and that their kids will soon be back home living in their basements.

      • Then they’ll be back in their underroos trolling AR.

      • The Final Solution

        The children of boomers and gen xers were raised on this crap. Probably had debates about identity politics over the dinner table.

    • Erasmus

      Bowdoin, Reed College, Evergreen State, Oberlin….some expensive lunatic asylums there.

  • anon

    I entered a small liberal arts college in 1969. Core requirements for all students were 1year Western Literature, 1 year history, 1 year science, 1 year math, 1 year foreign language, 1 year religion (one semester of which to be old or new testament), 1 semester writing, philosophy, social science, art or music, theater, 1 year phys ed. Our first two years were filled with core requirements.

    Every time I discuss anything with my peers or especially with people 6-10 years younger than I, I am thankful for my education. I acquired a basic outline of the history of Western Thought. Most graduates today can’t tell you in which century WW1 was fought.

    • Andy

      The only core requirements at my school that couldn’t be completed in high school were non-western culture, community service, and a multicultural music program.

      • jambi19

        Sad isn’t it? Your situation is certainly not unique.

    • mobilebay

      anon – I had the same experience, entering a small private university in 1962. I witnessed the difference in students of today when I saw a college group asked about Margaret Thatcher. Out of approximately seven young people, only one knew who she was. I don’t know what is being taught in schools today, but if they were any example the answer is: not much.

      • Midge

        Thats dreadful. These young people aren’t reading anything but Facebook.

    • Erasmus

      I vividly recall alluding to Boethius in a conversation with one young woman who’d graduated with an honors degree in philosophy and her having never even heard his name. Even if she hadn’t read The Consolation of Philosophy, I would have hoped that she might have at least heard of him.

      What passes for education today is pathetic. Children may not know how to read or write and haven’t a clue who the combatants were in The Hundred Years War, but, by God, they know how to unroll a condom over a banana and they sure feel good about themselves when they do it.

      • MBlanc46

        I suspect that very few Anglo-American philosophy students read Boethius these days (any more than they did decades ago when I was a philosophy student). That’s a pretty high bar. I’m more concerned that they might not know who Hobbes and Descartes are.

        • Epiminondas

          Or Herodotus and Goethe.

        • Erasmus

          Even if she hadn’t read Boethius, the poor lass, if she were a philosophy major, should have at least come across his name in a review course. While medieval philosophy wasn’t the last word in thought, it was key for what came later, and Boethius was key in the development of medieval thought.

          • MBlanc46

            Agreed. But even when I was a student, medieval philosophy wasn’t much discussed. All I ever formally studied was a bit in an undergrad history of Western phil course. A bit (not much) I picked up on my own. I don’t recall there being any medieval questions on the PhD prelim exams. I assume that the situation is rather worse now.

    • SFLBIB

      Words fail me when I think of the English 1A required by my community college. To this day, I cannot recall learning anything by analyzing a novel by Thomas Hardy, other than knowing how to analyze a novel by Thomas Hardy. For the final exam, we had to memorize [no notes allowed] a poem of minimum length, write it down in our exam booklet, and [you guessed it] analyze it. The purpose of memorizing it was not revealed. I will also never forget English 1B. We were handed a list of books from which to select for a book report. So I selected one that sounded interesting [at least it did to me]. When I got my grade for the report, I was disappointed. The instructor announced that he was available to discuss our grades, so I approached him, and he said, “Well, I really wanted you to select a book from the list.” That was 50 years ago, and I can still hear his voice. I showed him the list he handed out, and there it was, but he didn’t change my grade.

      At the end of my freshman year, my grades were terrible. The following fall, I met with my counselor who asked me, after seeing my grades, “You should be in math and science! Who told you to take liberal arts?” I informed him, not so kindly, that HE did. I never went back to him.

      I can truly say that this school TRIED to fail students. When I transferred to a four-year institution, I couldn’t believe it. They actually HELPED students who needed it. I have despised the liberal arts ever since.

      • MBlanc46

        I’m sorry that you had a bad experience. Many of us had very different, and much more positive, experiences.

        • SFLBIB

          I can’t even imagine how.

          • MBlanc46

            I think that says more about your poverty of imagination than it does about liberal arts education.

          • SFLBIB

            I don’t recall a certain level of imagination being listed in the course catalog as a prerequisite for English. I passed the two-week qualifying course. If I lacked sufficient imagination, the professor should have told me then.

          • MBlanc46

            Twas you who framed the issue in terms of your ability to imagine (“I can’t even imagine how.”).

          • SFLBIB

            Just an expression.

            “When I use a word, . . . it means just what
            I choose it to mean – neither more nor
            less.” – Humpty Dumpty, Through
            the Looking Glass
            by Lewis Carroll. [Emphasis in original]

          • MBlanc46

            The Humpty Dumpty theory of language: how postmodern. My only point is that it’s a bit over the top to condemn liberal education because you had a bad professor, All higher education is too PC for my tastes, and if I were paying for an offspring to attend a college or university, I’d sure look at the curriculum before signing any checks. But I’m quite sure that there are just as many identity politics courses at large state or private universities as there are at small liberal arts colleges.

          • SFLBIB

            It was a local community college. I would agree if it weren’t for the fact that it wasn’t just one bad professor. There were at least four: the two English professors, there were a bad speech instructor and a bad poly sci instructor. Reflecting back on my experience, I concluded that they must have taught the same subjects for so long that they were bored and needed to inject something in their classes to create comic relief. It was after them that I realized that half the battle of getting a college education is avoiding bad professors. Being 18 and idealistic, I guess I share in some of the blame. However, I would have killed for a website like ratemyprofessors.com. When my two boys started college, I warned them to be careful. One of them took my advice and turned in an essay that parroted the professor’s liberal line that he didn’t believe, and got an A.

            I share your opinion on the political correctness of today’s academy, although my experiences pre-date it by several decades. In fact, I have my own definition of it: “The rejection of truth that conflicts with ideology.” It requires that we pretend not to know something that we do. “The Emperor’s New Clothes” is the quintessential example of PC. Is this what classifies as learning?

            Today I contribute monthly to two legal advocacy groups who combat it for the benefit of students, like the one who was called a “fascist bastard” by his speech instructor who should have been fire on the spot; and the boy who was bullied by the school for stating his opposition to homosexuality on religious grounds; and the girl who was most recently punished for refusing to pledge allegiance to Mexico. When considering the large cottage industry of these groups, I conclude that the problem is far too great to ignore.

          • MBlanc46

            I can’t comment on your experience. I does seem to have been unpleasant. Sometimes teachers go on well past their sell-by dates, reading from the same old yellowed note cards, year after year after year. Fortunately, my school days predate PC as well. I work in scholarly publishing and see a good sample of what’s being written by faculty at a broad range of institutions. Some of it is great stuff. Some is PC fluff. Fighting PC is pretty difficult because the Ivory Tower is, by design, pretty insulated. Lawsuits are probably a good approach. Even if you don’t win, you can make it costly for them. How about posting some contact info for the advocacy groups you mention?

          • SFLBIB

            FIRE defends mainly free speech rights for students and
            professors:

            http://thefire.org/

            A list of cases:

            http://thefire.org/cases/all/

            The chutzpah of some schools is truly amazing:

            http://thefire.org/article/9865.html

            One of the more outrageous:

            http://thefire.org/public/pdfs/152_3346.pdf?direct

            The Alliance and Thomas More Law Center deal in a broader range of issues:

            http://www.alliancedefendingfreedom.org/

            http://www.thomasmore.org/

          • MBlanc46

            I certainly agree about FIRE.

  • The__Bobster

    It is unclear precisely how sharp the conversation got, but it evidently distressed Mills enough that he decided to mention Klingenstein (albeit not by name) in his subsequent commencement address as a particularly unpleasant golfing partner who’d interrupted his backswing to spout racist platitudes.
    __________

    There’s your problem. The inmates are running the asylum.

  • Bowdoin College, NOT elite anymore, is it?
    So, for all of you who are paying for your child’s “education”, did you have a hard time recognizing your son with his ZZtop beard? When you hugged him, was he reeking of marijuana?
    Does your daughter have her tramp stamp yet?

    Speaking of Maine, they just caught a hermit who has been living in the wild for 27 years, and he is accused of burglarizing 1,000 homes. I wonder where he went to school…

  • Robert Binion

    That course about gay sharecroppers looks interesting. Are they judged by the fruit of their labor?

    • Hunter Morrow

      Bananas and kumquats?

      • 1proactive2

        cucumbers

        • jane johnson

          Eggplant ( Italian version)

          • Robert Binion

            Now, Jane, let us not be bitter.

      • Bad_Mr_Frosty

        potatos

        • NeanderthalDNA

          Bad, bad, bad Mr. Frosty…

          LOL!!!

    • jane johnson

      What did you say to me? Deleted before I could catch it. Rephrase, please, counselor. Mods are tough today. Had 2 posts deleted, and I don’t know why…Never happened before, and I’m being no more obnoxious than usual…dang!

      • Robert Binion

        To moderate a white nationalist website must be the toughest job in existence. I love the abrasive writing found here.

        • jane johnson

          Tell me about it….now the post where I asked you to rephrase has been deleted! Guess there’s a certain amount of PC everywhere; even here. Wish I knew what the mod found objectionable…

        • Doing a root canal on a bengal tiger who has not been tranquilized is even tougher.

          • NeanderthalDNA

            I’ll take yer word for it. Keep up the good work, lol, and try not to think about bad mr. frosty’s amazing potato…

    • Riley DeWiley

      Are you nuts?

  • Bob

    The harsh reality of life will catch up to them after they graduate and have to find a job.

    No one is interested in their views of life. They want people who can think critically and get the job done.

    • Bill

      Like Apple, Microsoft, Home Depot, all governments on all levels, Starbucks, Sears, Penneys, etc etc I suppose? I could name a hundred others. And those trades run by unions? Fuggedaboudit. Unions are socialist these days, and will betray their members quicker than RINOs betray their base. The worms have burrowed far deeper into society than you could believe.

    • Cato

      You don’t understand. Just having gone to Bowdoin opens up doors that will remain closed to even the most competent graduate of a state university. Partly because a Bowdoin degree provides a signal (few can get in) and partly because the typical gregarious student will build a social network that will get them into Wall Street, the State Department, or wherever. They will get jobs, where they will eventually be in charge. That’s why it matters what they learn.

  • Andy

    “Queer Gardens”… This is why I almost opted out of college. (I found a reasonably conservative one, and now they’re wrecking it.)

  • The Final Solution

    A few days ago I commented about how white nationalists need to do more than just report race-related news and talk on forums and start exerting their influence. This is exactly what I’m talking about. This story is fantastic. Brilliant. We need to get organized and build institutions that support our interests. The left has a million organizations supporting their interests. There are a million foundations in America dedicated to advancing non-white peoples, closing the achievement gap, supporting the ‘Latino community’, etc. Why doesn’t someone with the means start a foundation dedicated to advancing our interests? What about AmRen? If I donate money to AmRen, what do I get in return? What goals are being accomplished other than daily news and the odd book publishing?

    • pcmustgo

      I think there will be more MODERATE racialist groups emerging for the emerging white minority. No neo-nazis, none of that.

      • pcmustgo

        Groups that try to change the image of how crime is reported, groups that openly discuss reverse racism in an honest, experential way, groups that work to change the image of whites just being slave owners, white history month groups, etc.

        • gemjunior

          Great idea, but how do we get to such people? Unfortunately they will usually be working on getting even richer and focusing on all the things that make our environment even worse – like mass immigration, advocating for humpty dumpty people coming across the border. On the other hand, Klingenstein’s reaction was out of character for a rich man so it seems some have feelings on this matter. There have to be some wealthy whites who are interested in helping to make these matters on your list happen.

          • SFLBIB

            “Great idea, but how do we get to such people?”

            All ideas start in the academy. I think we need to purge academia of those who talk nonsense that doesn’t support our founding beliefs, as in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, as originally understood.

    • Henry Clay

      Very good point. I wonder if Mr. K.could be asked to help round up a posse of similar people of means to give the financial “umph” needed to put the currently outnumbered and out gunned forces against political correctness on the offensive?

      Is there a strategic master-plan to turn things around?

    • Dr. X

      Your point is spot-on, but does not go far enough. As Jared Taylor reportedly said at the AmRen conference, it’s probably too late to save the U.S. We need a lot more than foundations and donations. We need a new country. Elite culture in the U.S is irrevocbly corrupt. Race realists — who, frankly, are simply “realists” — must appraise not only the racial situation and the immigration situation, but also the financial situation, the sexual revolution, political correctness, and, in sum, the entire countercultural victory of anti-Constitutional forces that now govern the U.S. It cannot be reformed. A new nation must be built upon the ruins of this one. The sooner the better.

    • MBlanc46

      Perhaps one thing we could do is check the current curricula of our alma maters and express our concern to the presidents if we’re displeased with the results. Of course, it would help if we could suggest that five or six figure checks might be forthcoming if we’re happy.

  • pcmustgo

    Why not add Oberlin and every other little 2-bit country college to the list? The more irrelevant the college, the more this stuff goes on. Yes, I knew an East Indian who went to Bowdoin and came out very angry and into the identity politics stuff.

    All “People of Color” get their a**es kissed at such universities. IMAGINE WHAT KIND OF ADDICTIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL POWER THAT MUST GIVE THEM? You guys question whether “Asian-Americans” can get into this stuff too. Why not? Don’t you see what this is about? It’s about all “People of Color” getting their butts kissed , put on a pedestal, worshiped, getting to be in control and in charge, at least on this front. It’s pretty tempting stuff, playing the victim.

    It’s about POWER. Including psychological power over whites.

    I would imagine only the most principaled among them would not get “into it”.

    • edie

      this is so utterly stupid………. whites are down to 9% of the world’s population……..

      these diverse ‘POC’ fill continents with their stone-age accomplishments or hard core communisms and feast on liberal shenanigans while laughing at how gullible and naive libs are.
      They have to wonder how the white race accomplished anything.

  • pcmustgo

    Also, Bowdoin is in Maine. We all know how the more white the state or place is, the more aggressively liberal.

    • pcmustgo

      And naive on race.

    • The Final Solution

      It sounds a lot like the infamous Reed College in Portland, OR or Evergreen College in Washington. I knew a working-class guy who attended Reed for a semester and ran like hell.

      • pcmustgo

        Many Whites seem to pimp out their working class or “I grew up poor” or “I’m not as rich as the next person” status too.

        Plenty of class resentment among whites. This mirrors the racial rage of non-whites. It’s picking classes of people, whether “the rich” or “whites” , as groups that deserve condoned hatred and punishment. They “deserve it” because they are oppressing people (not) and are “privileged”.

  • The Final Solution

    Man oh man their Board of Trustees must be red in the face! Hopefully this guy has the connections to get this report in front of the right people. This kind of thing could devastate their reputation and bottom line – everything from their enrollment, endowments, donations, and alumni relations to grants and academic rankings and everything in between. They should lose their accreditation and be stripped of university status if we lived in a sane world.

    • 1proactive2

      People with a healthy sense of shame get red-faced. Those without a conscience never do. The prototypical public university prof is a legend in his or her own mind which thus negates normal responses to their pathological/aberrant behavior.
      Any attacks on their silliness will be met with raging name-calling episodes such as “fascist, gun-totin’ redneck,” or “Bible-thumping religious zealot”. They truly feel they are superior to all of us tax-paying regular folk.

      • Erasmus

        Those without a conscience never do. The prototypical public university prof is a legend in his or her own mind which thus negates normal responses to their pathological/aberrant behavior.

        We are living in the age of the sociopath.

  • jambi19

    http://www.collegedata.com/cs/data/college/college_pg03_tmpl.jhtml?schoolId=138

    Tuition at Bowdoin college:$ 44,188 dollars per year undergrad. My doctorate program is half that. It’s interesting how I had to go to an independent website to find out the tuition. It is becoming a new marketing strategy for colleges not to reveal tuition until admittance…right around the time they are putting a FAFSA form in front of you to apply for your government college loan.

    • Garrett Brown

      44 grand a year to be brainwashed. Something tells me that isn’t worth it.

      • Erasmus

        You should get a whole lot more than brainwashing for $44K a year.

        • And I’m sure they do — Free condoms, abortifacients, levonorgestrel, dildos.

          Because…Freedom.

          And also…War on Women.

          • Erasmus

            For $44K they should wake you up with a hummer every morning.

    • Michael_C_Scott

      “Tuition at Bowdoin college: $44,188 per year undergrad. My doctorate program is half that.”

      You’re *paying* for grad school?

      I was *paid* US $3300 per month ($39,600 per year) to get my master’s degree. I wouldn’t have done it if I hadn’t been paid, and not a little RA stipend, either: “Research for free? You must have me confused with someone else!”

      • jambi19

        No one pursuing my degree is getting paid for it. Even full ride scholarships to Africans is unheard of. Only people that get paid sign decade long contracts with the military so they get full tuition back back one year for one year. So most end up doing 8 in education + 8 in full enlistment. So 16 years in total. That’s the only way to get paid in my degree program.

        • Michael_C_Scott

          That doesn’t sound like much fun!

  • Luca

    Colleges are now diploma mills whereby anyone with a student loan and an acceptable ethnicity can get in and pass while being properly indoctrinated and learning nothing of value. I went back to school as an adult and I recall a Chinese student in Speech class giving a speech that literally required an interpreter. He passed without knowing the rudimentary basics of English language or pronunciation. Then there was the Am. History prof. telling us all wars fought by the US were based on racism. After my blood pressured lowered to the 200’s I asked him if he ever heard of Pearl Harbor and did he know who we fought in WW1. The young kids in the class were clueless as to what I was eluding to. He told me his credentials outweighed my opinions.

    Academia is part of the Liberal mafia.

    • 1proactive2

      Yikes! What an experience! I’d have probably gotten some jail time after an exchange with that clown.

    • PesachPatriot

      Wow…that is a double facepalm…so george washington and thomas jefferson were racist against king george the third? Was US Grant racist against R.E Lee or was it the other way around? Was the war of 1812 more anti-british racism? Did america attack afghanistan because we dislike brown folks with beards and turbans or because they decided to remodel the manhattan skyline and a wing of the pentagon? I’m glad I have a few old history books in my house to read to my kid when she is older. Didn’t the professor understand that most wars in recorded history are usually fought over religion, political ideas or money/natural resources?

      • Luca

        The problem is, it’s just so hip and fashionable to be either gay, liberal, anti-white, anti-American or all of the above, that the snooty little twerp professor just couldn’t contain himself in front of all those impressionable 20-year olds. And to make matters worse he was hispanic.

        • PesachPatriot

          You should ask him to discuss the slave trade in mexico, spanish “racism” against the amerindian(and black) population down there(which continues to this day…amerindians in the USA got a much better deal than those south of the border), chattel slavery in the US ended in 1865….it didn’t end in brazil until 1888 or so….i am fairly liberal on certain issues(plants, foreign policy and gay marriage mostly), but to quote merle haggard “when you’re running down my country, you’re walking on the fighting side of me”.

          If this professor is feeling so threatened and unsafe in this imperialistic, bloodthirsty, war mongering racist country with the worst record in all recorded history he should feel free to enjoy the peace, love, kumbuya and egalitarian brotherhood and sisterhood in places like el salvador, cuba liberia,zimbabwe, gaza, syria or bangladesh. He’d be screaming to be let back in to this country within a week or less.

    • MikeofAges

      “alluding”, not “eluding”.

  • NYB

    It looks like Barry Mills insulted the wrong guy.

    Thomas Klingenstein is founder and principal of a New York money management firm, Cohen Klingenstein LLC. He is a board member of The Klingenstein Third Generation Fund.

    The Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation awards grants to major medical institutions for post-doctoral fellowships. Their stated mission is to “enlarge the academic and research pool by nurturing the talents of high-quality medical students and graduates from medical schools and graduate programs”.

    I can understand the irritation he must have felt, being belittled by a school president spouting off in defense of money-wasting, resource-sucking diversity.

  • LastBastionOfHope

    Let me guess…in the “Sexual Life in Colonialism” class, the main premise is “da so called white manz raped da brown girlz”.

    • gemjunior

      Dat wut da whole thing be about, how da massa be rapin’ all dem girls in dere cabins, like whut he dun did to Kizzy. And how stingy dey white wimmin was to dey man not givin him dat good lovin’ so da white man, he really only do it wit his wife to git doze white babies but he really like da brown girlz better cause dey is a whole lot sexier den doze white ladies with dere flat butts.

    • Bad_Mr_Frosty

      Well, for the Amerindians it raised their IQ an gave them genetic resistance to smallpox. I doubt it was rape anyway, I’m sure the native women were lining up to be with the exotic, intelligent conquerors.

  • bigone4u

    I’ve mentioned in previous comments that I was a university professor for 30 years. During that time I watched the creeping ascent of Cultural Marxism. At the university I was associated with, it ramped up in the 90s as a new white male president committed to diversity took over. Then in 1999 an Hispanic male was selected by the conservative white Board of Regents to lead the university. They must not have read his writings. He’s a “Mexicano” supremicist, oddly enough married to a white woman faculty member. Between the two of them they pull in $500,000 to $600,000 a year. Most of his executive appointments have been of fellow Hispanics, including La Raza types. His plan for the university was simple: more Mexicans–students, faculty, adminstrators. Many new administrative positions have been created to give Hispanics jobs. He hired the school’s first transgendered instructor. Recruited and paid a Hispanic lesbian Dean a $300,000 salary to ensure that diversity included lesbians. Created a new executive position so that her lover would have a job there. I always wondered what the local business community thinks about all this. The lot of them keep their Marxism/lesbianism/anti-male/anti-white agend quiet when fund raising, but when it comes to the curriculum, it’s been radicalized. Lots of alternative history and English classes focusing on the “All women are lesbians” feminist meme. Each school probably has its own unique story, but Bowdoin is not alone in oppressing the group that the Cultural Marxists hate–whites, especially white males.

    • NeanderthalDNA

      No “queer gardens”?

      We’re gonna close that achievement gap no matter how low we gotta lower standards!!!

      No, we’re not. Just gonna make a big ugly mess.

  • c684570

    Bowdoin attempts to defend itself:

    Go to Facebook / Bowdoin

  • c684570

    “The racial makeup of the town was 95.3% White, 0.7% African American, 0.6% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.0% of the population.”

    Shocking.

  • ViktorNN

    Wow! Sounds like Barry Mills really p*ssed off the wrong Klingenstein.

  • JohnEngelman

    The report notes: In the Minutes of the Faculty, the “underpreparedness” of students is most

    emphatically linked with the college’s pursuit of racial diversity. This probably reflects a genuine gap in the level of academic performance of black students and members of other racially-defined segments of the student population.

    – Mytheos Holt, The Blaze, April 8, 2013

    Some people refuse to recognize racial differences, even when those differences stare at them every day in class. The problem is not lack of preparation. It is lack of native ability.

  • JohnEngelman

    One might learn good written and verbal skills at a college like Bowdoin. One might be admitted to law school. Otherwise one is wasting time and a lot of money.

  • Bob Zimmerman

    Klingenstein is a Jewish name yet he’s obviously against the glorification of diversity and is critical of the over promotion of unqualified minorities. Let this be proof that there are Jews who are on the right side on these issues. It shouldn’t have to be said, but it often needs a reminder here — not all Jews are for Cultural Marxism.

    • T_Losan

      I knew an Israeli Jew well and she was certainly aware…I imagine many other Israelis are as well.

  • Erasmus

    Bowdoin is an expensive school. One would hope that if mom and pop are shelling out all that money, their little crumb-crutchers might get more than ghetto-jive and bulldyke feminism.

  • Epiminondas

    You can’t fix education. Blow it up and start over.

  • SFLBIB

    If these schools were truly interested in diversity, they should be after diversity of thought as well as skin color. Part of this diversity of thought would be a diversity of preparedness: under-prepared students to provide needed diversity with well-prepared ones. Then there is the only diversity that anyone really cares about: diversity of ethnic foods in the cafeteria. Why, the list is endless.

  • The Final Solution

    Here’s the response from Bowdoin’s president:

    http://www.bowdoindailysun.com/2013/04/barry-mills-setting-the-record-straight/

    The only thing I’ll agree on is that they attacked the college too strongly and in an obviously biased way, which hurt it’s credibility and especially make it hard to persuade those on the other side of the debate.