Dorner: Another Fatherless Black Man with a Gun

Larry Elder, WND, February 13, 2013

My new book, “Dear Father, Dear Son,” talks about the No. 1 social problem in America – children growing up without fathers.

In 1965, Daniel Patrick Moynihan wrote “The Negro Family: A Case for National Action.” At the time, 25 percent of blacks were born outside of wedlock, a number that the future Democratic senator from New York said was catastrophic to the black community.

Moynihan wrote: “A community that allows a large number of young men to grow up in broken homes, dominated by women, never acquiring any stable relationship to male authority, never acquiring any rational expectations about the future – that community asks for and gets chaos. Crime, violence, unrest, unrestrained lashing out at the whole social structure – that is not only to be expected, it is very near to inevitable.”

Today, 75 percent of black children enter a world without a father in the home.

Divorce is one thing, where, for the most part, fathers remain involved both financially and as a parent. When I pressed the point of murdering ex-cop Christopher Dorner’s father, one local news source told me his father apparently died when Dorner was small. He was reportedly raised, along with his sister, by a single mom. Little else is known.

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Why is it when white murderers go on a rampage, the media quickly delve into the relationship or lack thereof with the killer’s father? They want to know what went wrong with that relationship – and when and how and why.

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But what about Christopher Dorner? The media seemingly imposed a no-fly zone of silence over even writing or talking about his father.

The Los Angeles Times, for example, wrote: “Dorner grew up in Southern California with his mother and at least one sister, according to public records and claims in (his) manifesto.” Not one word about the father. {snip} Why? Is it that the media expect a certain level of appropriate behavior from whites–that when a white person commits a heinous act, we must necessarily explore what kind of relationship he had with his father?

But when it comes to black miscreants and their fathers … crickets. Why? To ask raises uncomfortable questions about the perverse incentives of the welfare state, which hurt the very formation of stable, intact families–the ones more likely to produce stable, non-paranoid children.

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