Detroit’s Demise: A Story About Race?

SBPDL, April 10, 2012

April 10, 2012. Denver, Colorado: It’s not “liberalism” that destroyed Detroit. It’s not “unions” that left Detroit in ruins. Paul Kersey–of SBPDL.com fame–answers the question of who is to blame for Detroit’s collapse in his fourth book, Escape from Detroit: The Collapse of America’s Black Metropolis.

In 1950, Detroit was known to the World as the “Paris of the West.” Boasting a thriving economy and a population of more than 2 million people (80 percent of whom were white), the sky seemed the only limit for this city on the move.

In 1967, the “Arsenal of Democracy” would be home to the worst riot in American history as the Black population of Detroit–roughly 30 percent of the population at the time–would explode in an orgy of violence that was only stopped when the Army marched into town to restore order.

The white population of the city would flee for the suburbs, leaving the remaining Black population in political control of the city’s destiny.

In 2012, order still hasn’t been restored. Now, a city of roughly 770,000 inhabitants (89 percent Black) has collapsed in a sea of financial mismanagement, crime, drugs, broken schools, eroding infrastructure, and hopelessness.

“When you actually look at Detroit’s history, you see the blueprint for the demise of America,” says Paul Kersey.

Detroit is the story of America’s future. Escape from Detroit: The Collapse of America’s Black Metropolis is the first of it’s kind: a book that places the blame for the complete collapse of the city on its majority population. It serves as a clarion call to other American cities.

The book is now available in both paperback and for the Amazon Kindle. On April 7, it reached No.1 in the category of Urban Planning and City Development on Amazon.

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