African Ancestry Is Associated with Asthma Risk in African Americans

C. Flores et al., Pub Med, January 3, 2012

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Asthma is a common complex condition with clear racial and ethnic differences in both prevalence and severity. Asthma consultation rates, mortality, and severe symptoms are greatly increased in African descent populations of developed countries. African ancestry has been associated with asthma, total serum IgE and lower pulmonary function in African-admixed populations. To replicate previous findings, here we aimed to examine whether African ancestry was associated with asthma susceptibility in African Americans. In addition, we examined for the first time whether African ancestry was associated with asthma exacerbations.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

After filtering for self-reported ancestry and genotype data quality, samples from 1,117 self-reported African-American individuals from New York and Baltimore (394 cases, 481 controls), and Chicago (321 cases followed for asthma exacerbations) were analyzed. Genetic ancestry was estimated based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs) selected for being highly divergent among European and West African populations (95 AIMs for New York and Baltimore, and 66 independent AIMs for Chicago). Among case-control samples, the mean African ancestry was significantly higher in asthmatics than in non-asthmatics (82.0±14.0% vs. 77.8±18.1%, mean difference 4.2% [95% confidence interval (CI):2.0-6.4], p<0.0001). This association remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (odds ratio: 4.55, 95% CI: 1.69-12.29, p = 0.003). African ancestry failed to show an association with asthma exacerbations (p = 0.965) using a model based on longitudinal data of the number of exacerbations followed over 1.5 years.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

These data replicate previous findings indicating that African ancestry constitutes a risk factor for asthma and suggest that elevated asthma rates in African Americans can be partially attributed to African genetic ancestry.

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  • Premature births.  From what I have been made to understand, the last three weeks of human gestation is critical in the transmission of the mother’s immune system and antibodies to her about to be born child.  A child born before that’s all done will run a far higher risk of having allergies, and since allergies are a trigger for asthma, a higher chance of suffering it.

    • Blacks in all nations have a shorter gestational time than any other race. They are opposite asians on the R-K evolution as pointed out in The Global Bell Curve

  • The Global Bell Curve shows that blacks are on the opposite of asians in the R-K evolutionary scale. This concurs with blacks having the highest infant mortality rate even in 1stworld nations with free health care. The R side of evolution produces more low quality offspring where more will die off, like an oyster.

  • As we see here both asthma and mental illness can be genetic.  If you look up (the warrior gene) you can see violence can be genetic. So that just leaves low IQ and propensity for rape.

  • Anonymous

    Exactly. Apparently genes can influence the development of breathing airways (and skin color, hair texture, facial features, muscle tone, susceptibility to sickle cell anemia, etc.)  but not brains.

  • Anonymous

    Exactly. Apparently genes can influence the development of breathing airways (and skin color, hair texture, facial features, muscle tone, susceptibility to sickle cell anemia, etc.)  but not brains.

  • DM6

    European countries have the highest rates of Asthma.