The 6 Most Secretly Racist Classic Children’s Books

Juan Arteaga and John Champion, Cracked, December 19, 2011

Every piece of art is a product of the society that created it. {snip} Fortunately, we can shield our children from movies that might otherwise lead them to believe that the cast of Friends had successful film careers.

Things get a little trickier when classics of children’s literature suddenly let fly with the sort of out-of-the-blue casual racism usually reserved for old Southern men after a few too many drinks.

#6. The Secret Garden

It is the classic tale of a spoiled little girl named Mary whose parents die in India and who is sent back to England and put in the care of her emotionally distant sort of an asshole uncle. As she wanders around her uncle’s Castlevania-sized house, she finds a forgotten garden and a small, sickly boy, and with the magical power of flowers and wishes, the sickly boy gets healthier and then her uncle rediscovers the power of love and everyone becomes a better person.

{snip}

The Racism:

In the book, on the first morning after Mary moves into her uncle’s mansion, she is awakened by a straight-talking maidservant named Martha. It’s the sort of character who would be played by a sassy black lady in a modern American movie, but this is England, so Martha is just sassy and poor. She’s so sassy, in fact, that she tells her child-boss Mary that she thought she was going to be black because she came from India. Mary of course throws a temper tantrum, exclaims that blacks “are not people,” and bursts into tears.

{snip}

{snip} Unlike Mark Twain’s controversial Huck Finn, where the racially insensitive language is offset by Huck and Jim’s tender, buddy cop dynamic, Mary’s virulent racism is never corrected by anyone or by anything that happens in the book. In fact, Martha uses her role as the voice of reason in the situation to blame Mary’s awful behavior on the fact that she is from India, where there are “a lot of blacks there instead of respectable white people.”

{snip}

#5. Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes is one of the most beloved and iconic characters in the history of fiction, and if you are wondering what he is doing in this list, then it’s because you are only familiar with him through the countless movies and TV shows and not the original books.

{snip}

The Racism:

In “The Adventure of the Three Gables,” Holmes pursues a former slave named Steve Dixie. When Holmes catches up to Steve, he quickly dismantles him with his trademark analytical inquiry:

“I’ve wanted to meet you for some time,” said Holmes. “I won’t ask you to sit down, for I don’t like the smell of you, but aren’t you Steve Dixie, the bruiser?”

“That’s my name, Masser Holmes, and you’ll get put through it for sure if you give me any lip.”

“It is certainly the last thing you need,” said Holmes, staring at our visitor’s hideous mouth.

{snip}

{snip} In the second Holmes novel, The Sign of the Four, we meet a character named Tonga who is an aborigine from the Andaman Islands. Holmes doesn’t even need to smell Tonga to know he doesn’t like him, since he’s studied up on his people, and therefore knows that “they are naturally hideous, having large, misshapen heads, small fierce eyes and distorted features. Their feet and hands, however, are remarkably small . . . . They have always been a terror to shipwrecked crews, braining the survivors with their stone-headed clubs, or shooting them with their poisoned arrows. These massacres are invariably concluded by a cannibal feast.”

{snip}

#4. Tintin in the Congo

Tintin is the classic Belgian comic book about a young reporter, his dog and his bearded drunken sailor pal. Georges “Herge” Remi, the artist who created Tintin, is difficult to pigeonhole on the racism spectrum. On one hand, he was arrested four times on suspicion of being a Nazi sympathizer. On the other hand, he worked to change the portrayal of Asian people in European fiction from inscrutable and evil lemon-colored quasi humanoids to, you know, people. {snip}

The Racism:

On Tintin’s journey to the Congo, all of the black people he meets are drawn to look like they’re about to take the stage in the most offensive minstrel show ever put on. The Congo in Georges Remi’s mind is populated infantile and naive imbeciles who are seemingly designed only to prove that condescension has an equivalent to blind hatred. Tintin and his traveling partner don’t mistreat the natives. They find their attempts to build a country adorable, like a chimp that’s learned to eat with a knife and fork. It’s worth noting here that Tintin isn’t nearly as condescending as his traveling partner, a talking dog.

TinTin1.jpg

{snip}

In the comic–which was published 30 years after Joseph Conrad published Heart of Darkness–the Congolese people practically drop to their knees and begin worshiping their honky masters, thankful for their presence in the Congo.

TinTin2.jpg

{snip}

#3. The Chronicles of Narnia

{snip}

But all of that changes when C.S. Lewis decided to take us to the southern realms of Narnia in the fifth book, The Horse and His Boy. The titular boy is Shasta, and when he finds out that his adoptive dad is planning to sell him into slavery, he packs his stuff and runs away.

The Racism:

The people of the south, including Shasta’s adoptive father, are a dark-skinned people known as Calormenes. How do they differ from the cast of characters we meet up north? Well, the Calormenes live in the desert, have long beards, wear turbans and pointy slippers and are ruled by Tarkaans, which some have pointed out is vaguely similar to the Middle Eastern military rulers known as Tarkhans.

While the Calormenes are very clear stand-ins for Middle Eastern people, their religion focuses on a Satanic figure named Tash who requires human sacrifices. Also, they are all assholes. The first Calormene we meet is trying to sell his own adopted son into slavery, and it doesn’t get any better from there. They are all self-centered, traitorous, greedy, cruel and cowardly.

{snip}

So basically, all the Middle Eastern characters are evil jerks except those who abandon their culture and faith. So the best case that can be made for Narnia is that Middle Eastern people aren’t inherently evil, they just need to be converted to Christianity. {snip}

#2. Noddy

Noddy is the main character in a series of children’s books about a small wooden toy who lives in Toyland with other toys. His adventures were published from 1949 all the way to 1963. While relatively unknown in the U.S., Noddy books are a huge success in Europe and continue to be great sellers. {snip}

The Racism:

Just like the Toy Story series makes room for every different type of doll you might have grown up with, Noddy covered the bases of early 20th century toy boxes, featuring characters such as Mr. Tubby Bear (a Teddy bear), Dinah Doll (a china doll) and the Golliwogs (a family of racist monstrosities).

To be fair, Enid Blyton, the creator of Noddy, did not invent the idea of Golliwogs. They were based on real minstrel dolls that British children apparently used to pelt with rubber balls for being ugly. {snip}

In the Noddy books, the Golliwogs are portrayed as deceitful assholes who trick Noddy and steal his stuff. In Here Comes Noddy Again, the Golliwogs ask Noddy for help, only to take him into the woods and steal his car and clothes.

{snip}

#1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

{snip}

You probably remember the Oompa Loompas–they look like compact clowns and sing creepy songs while getting rid of the corpses of the victims of Willy Wonka’s shoddy factory safety standards. If you are wondering what’s so racist about them it’s because you are only familiar with them from the movies.

The Racism:

In the original book, the Oompa Loompas don’t come from Loompaland–they come from Central Africa, and they were described as just regular ol’ black pygmies and not hippie clown dwarfs. They were relocated to Loompaland and their skin was changed from black to white in the illustrations thanks to growing controversy in the ’70s. Get your hands on one of the versions printed before the world came to its goddamn senses, and you’ll read about how Willy Wonka simply found a tribe of Africans, enslaved them and used them to replace his regular work force because they were willing to work for chocolate. {snip}

{snip}

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  • Urban Teacher

    I need to ask my mother if she still has the Little Black Sambo record I listened to back in 1949.

  • Hirsch

    All this proves is that racial heresy and intelligence are not antithetical to one-another. Think of all the soft science Liberal Arts majors turned out every year whose only fervent belief is that “we’re all the same” and that anyone who believes different is “ignorant.”

    Well, then, the list of ignorant people is long and includes the likes of everyone from H.P. Lovecraft, Winston Churchill, and Charles Darwin. Good company to keep.

    As an aside, I’ve noticed that three of the five on the “racist” list are still in the popular media. In fact, a Tintin movie is in theaters right now.

  • Anonymous

    According to the liberals thinking, virtually everything and everyone prior to 1960s would be a racist, sexist, xenophobic, homophobic, and all around pure evil. There wasn’t a real hero or truly good person in America until the days of MLK, according to their logic.

  • Tim in Indiana

    I see this is from Cracked Online. Some of their pieces are actually funny, but as part of the MSM, they suffer from “Political Correctness Disease.”

    Cracked started out as a print magazine (sort of a MAD magazine wannabe) before going online. Well, like almost all parts of the MSM, they are most decidedly liberal. As a kid, I grew up on a diet of MAD and Cracked, and they played their own small role in the brainwashing.

    This is not to say that blacks or hispanics ever had much of a representation in their magazines, but the magazines could be counted on to put a liberal slant on any features they ran touching on politics.

    Cracked Online seems to be fond of “Top Ten Lists,” and perhaps they are running out of material, but they toe the “anti-racism” line whenever possible. In a recent feature, they listed ways in which the movies are hopelessly out of touch, one example being that they are still notably reluctant to depict white/black relationships.

    Of course they will never run a feature lampooning the “anti-racists” or questioning the whole racial grievance industry. That would itself be “racist.”

  • Anonymous

    So, the most racist thing at the end of the one comic, all the racism that can be found in the comic, is the final statement to the effect of, “White man very good! big master! Master Boulo cure my husband!”

    If we reverse this one comic, from 80 years ago, we would instead praise everything the wise person of color does and be forced to say how great and enriching they all are!

    Wait, that’s how it goes every day.

    Why not reverse the white man very good, part too? How about, instead of pointing out white men cured Small Pox, we can say white man heepum bad, eradicated everyone else using small pox. Because the idea white-men eradicated small pox from the globe could be bad for ones self esteem, and be an insensitive thing to say.

  • Anonymous

    All this proves is that racial heresy and intelligence are not antithetical to one-another. Think of all the soft science Liberal Arts majors turned out every year whose only fervent belief is that “we’re all the same” and that anyone who believes different is “ignorant.”

    Well, then, the list of ignorant people is long and includes the likes of everyone from H.P. Lovecraft, Winston Churchill, and Charles Darwin. Good company to keep.

    Indeed. Some of these men’s views would strip the paint off the walls if uttered today at a party. Who, do you think, wrote the following paragraph?

    In extreme cases, there can be little doubt of the superiority of one race to another. North America, Australia and New Zealand certainly contribute more to the civilisation of the world than they would do if they were still peopled by aborigines. It seems on the whole fair to regard Negroes as on the average inferior to white men, although for work in the tropics they are indispensable, so that their extermination (apart from the question of humanity) would be highly undesirable.

    Was it Goebbels? Enoch Powell? David Duke? Nick Griffin?

    Nope! It was good old progressive Bertrand Russell, in his book Marriage and Morals: http://goo.gl/TUqju

    And what about the following statement? Surely it was written by a mouth-breather living in a basement somewhere:

    A perfectly stupid race can never rise to a very high plane; the negro, for instance, has been kept down as much by lack of intellectual development as by anything else; but the prime factor in the preservation of a race is its power to attain a high degree of social efficiency. Love of order, ability to fight well and breed well, capacity to subordinate the interests of the individual to the interests of the community, these and similar rather humdrum qualities go to make up the sum of social efficiency. The race that has them is sure to overturn the race whose members have brilliant intellects, but who are cold and selfish and timid, who do not breed well or fight well, and who are not capable of disinterested love of the community. In other words, character is far more important than intellect to the race as to the individual.

    Nope–not even close. It was Teddy Roosevelt, who Cracked.com has lionized many times in the past.

  • Anonymous

    “Tarkhan” is not of Middle Eastern origin, it is of central Asian origin and it means “hero.” It could be loosely translated as champion or warrior. Tarkhans were accomplished warriors.

  • Anonymous

    Wow, it’s a good thing that the world came to its senses, I don’t know if I could have stood it if white people were still in a position of power and influence! How awful that would be for us whites! How would we ever live with ourselves?

    Really, only a so-called “progressive” would nitpick about old works of fiction and try to apply today’s standards as promoted by “progressives” to earlier times. They even feel the need to constantly attack and belittle the Founding Fathers on these grounds!

    Also, the authors take for granted that racism was behind the terms used in Mark Twain’s books. The opposite is true but you couldn’t explain that to the black activists who insist upon banning the books. For some reason they don’t get it, it seems to be beyond their ken, they can’t wrap their minds around the concept of satire. Mark Twain simply used realistic regional dialects and was actually not promoting racism anyway. He was kind of liberal but I doubt that he would embrace what it means to be liberal now.

  • Anonymous

    What about my favorite “The Matchlock Gun” by Walter Edmonds who also authored Drums Along the Mohawk. The Matchlock Gun was a Newberry Award winner back in the 40’s that told a tale of a New York State frontier family fighting the savage Mohawk Indians. Today’s schools wouldn’t touch it with a ten foot pole. A true American classic that I remember my kindergarten teacher reading to us back in the late 60’s.

  • E Pluribus Pluribus

    To the list of censored children’s classics add the original — and unsurpassed classic — THE STORY OF DOCTOR DOLITTLE. As the nation’s foremost education historian New York University research professor Diane Ravitch noted in THE LANGUAGE POLICE: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Children Learn (2003):

    “The American publisher of Dr. Dolittle, agreeing that the series contain stereotypical images of Africans, expurgated the books to remove offensive illustrations and text. The original version of the books has now disappeared from library shelves and bookstores.” (p84)

  • Sylvie

    This ‘evidence’ of racism presented here is not very compelling is it? Ol’ Sherlock makes a smart comment to Steve Dixie and a passing comment on the aboriginies of the Andaman Islands. That’s it. Now the entire Sherlock Holmes collection has been roundly condemned by a bunch of overgrown college students.

    If you want an adult fun-filled and ‘politically unsound’ literary romp, I suggest you check out George MacDonald Fraser’s ‘Flashman’ series. I laughed out loud reading them.

    We used to have Golliwog chocolate biscuits, now they’re called ‘Scallywags’,but how come a ‘paddy wagon’ is still called a paddy wagon?

  • king of Utah

    Another good place to find clear headed discussion of race is old time radio staticofthemind.com has thousands for free one of them the world adventurers club is awesome; here is one quote ” the blacks are simple minded and must be watched at all times to make sure they are attending to their tasks and also to keep their natural instinct to steal at Bey.” Comedy all around. Thank you Mr Taylor for all you do.

  • Anonymous

    #8: [Mark Twain] was kind of liberal but I doubt that he would embrace what it means to be liberal now.

    You’re absolutely right about that. Of course if anyone knew what today’s so-called society was like, they would have shipped all of the blacks out of America, the Race for Africa never would’ve happened, and the Middle East would still be ruled by an Ottoman Sultan.

  • Anonymous

    I would also recommend the video, “This is the Army” starring Alan Hale, Sr., and Ronald Reagan.

    There is a great Minstrel Show number in this video, which is part of their Soldiers’ Show, during World War II.

  • Anonymous

    Anybody who sees these books as ‘racist’ must be mentally deranged. I’ve enjoyed Sherlock Holmes since I was a young girl, and I still love the series. One of my mother’s favourite books is ‘The Secret Garden’, and I’ve got friends that, as children, loved the Narnia series. They saw nothing racist with those books either. However, I must add, neither me, my family, nor my friends are PC and we all are ‘racially aware’ so to speak.

    PC numbnuts should quit nitpicking at classic literature and whatnot for signs of ‘racism’.

  • Anonymous

    Liberals oppress people they disagree with and destroy their careers, which is exactly what they complain conservatives are trying to do to them.

  • Anonymous

    I bought a Little Black Sambo book, I used to read one all he time when we went out for Sunday morning pancakes when I was little, living in LA in the 80’s. not a thing racist about that book, just like 99.99999% of the “das’ racis’ ” claims. all bogus.

    Great kid’s book, beautifully done. My kids will love it too.

    you always have to beware of censors – they love to erase and demonize history, liberty and freedom in all of its forms.

  • Anonymous

    Next, let’s see a list of books, television programs, and movies that are racist toward white people.

    It’d be a long list, and it’d need to be updated often.

  • CidMartel

    I agree with Sylvie, the Flashman books are all extremely un-PC and Eurocentric, that’s why I love them as well! I remember Tin Tin as an early morning cartoon when I was a child, and what about Kimba the White Lion! Every American child should read the Matchlock Gun, order it on Amazon.

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    We used to have Golliwog chocolate biscuits, now they’re called ‘Scallywags’,but how come a ‘paddy wagon’ is still called a paddy wagon?

    Not in Los Angeles!! (of ALL places).

    L.A. police change their Paddy wagon to Party wagon after Irish groups complained about ethnic slur.

    Bon

  • GM (Australia)

    “Things get a little trickier when classics of children’s literature suddenly let fly with the sort of out-of-the-blue casual racism usually reserved for old Southern men after a few too many drinks.”

    Not only in kids classics, This reminds me of a news clip on TV News last night regarding a very prominent Australian and former (very popular) president of the Returned Servicemans League who has just passed away. They re-ran his infamous statement where he compared Desmond Tutu to a witch doctor dressed up as an archbishop!

    Looking round the bookstores this Christmas we have a kids book by the title of “The Little Refugee”. Very PC and designed to brainwash kids into being tolerant of illegal immigrants. (But note I do not want to see any child suffer but these hell holes throughout the 3rd world need to get their own houses in order rather than invade the west)

    Re Enid Blyton Books (Creator of Noddy), I understand they now reissued PC versions where one of the kids is a black girl (who of course solves all the mysteries.)

    My boys loved “Biggles” books (by Capt W. Johns), all about a British airman and his adventures. The language police took them out of school libraries here because they were sexist and racist!. I still have many down in my basement, I hope there is not a raid!

    Has anyone out there read of Sherlock Holmes & Watsons visit to a London opium den, its a classic and not very PC.(The place is full of foreigners)

    Time to wish all fellow supporters of Amren a Happy Christmas. That is while we are still allowed to say that word (Christmas) which apparently just so soooo offensive to all the minorities who seem want to make this country home.

    PS. Re “Cracked” , I am not very impressed, don’t like their vile language and just can’t see what they are trying to get across.

  • GenX ANZAC

    I can imagine in a not to distant future, perhaps when GenY are at the great grand parent age, that future people across the board will know absolutely nothing of past culture.

    It’s like the progressives have found the cultural ‘refresh’ button and everytime they click it, numourous historical objects just disappear.

    I wish that we were watching this deconstruction from the ‘outside looking in’, as opposed to the current ‘inside looking out’ situation.

  • Anonymous

    I am SO surprised that JRR Tolkien’s, “The Lord of the Rings” was not included to make the list Seven. As a long time reader and student of Tolkien, I remember the early criticisms by feminists and in general due to the alleged sexism and racism of Tolkien. When the films came out, a local daily ran a huge editorial column condemning the film as racist, and further as a warmongering celebration of whiteness. (It was 2003).

    It ought to have been included because Sinclair Lewis’ “Chronicles of Narnia” are less of a classic and he was a friend and colleague of Tolkien AND since Sherlock Holmes is included as a “Children’s Classic” LOTR would be since it’s often dark material equals Tolkien’s works, at least.

    Tolkien’s greater mission, according to him was to use the old Norse styled Hero Tale to instill what he called “Classic Western Values,” into the new generation of English youth. He was very surprised when the youth of America responded to his work with the overwhelming enthusiasm it did. It has been noted that he did it, as a devout Catholic, without one reference or influence of Christianity. It was a pure Northern European fantasy saga where the most beautiful, intelligent, and highest of races in his created world fought for the good, while all the inferior, brute, and miscegenated races fought for an evil, world destroying master, while struggling to not be corrupted by key article of power creating, a magic ring.

    I’m amazed they left it out. But for you who have not read the books or seen the film, I recommend both. You will read of the value of beauty and good in valuing your own people and kind. What I have learned of positive racism, I have learned from Tolkien.

  • Anonymous

    One wonders whether the authors of this article took it seriously. They have an awful lot of self-loathing to type this inanity.

    One wonders why Malcolm X’s “Autobiography” and Eldridge Cleaver’s “Soul on Ice” didn’t make it to the list.

  • Alexandra

    Remember this quote from George Orwell: “He who controls the present, controls the past. He who controls the past, controls the future.”

    They want to make it sound like, as #3 pointed out, everyone was oh-so-evil for not liking or trusting or wanting to be around someone different than themselves. True history must be consigned to the memory hole.

    It’s no wonder Tim Wise can’t wait for elderly whites to die…they know what it was like back then.

    I’m just surprised that Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” didn’t make the list. Sinclair describes blacks as stupid, lazy, and basically immoral.

  • Sam

    My first two books as a five year old were “Peter Rabbit” and most appropriately “Little Black Sambo.”

  • Southern Hoosier

    What happened to “The Story of Little Black Sambo?” I thought that was suppose to be #1 on the racist children books.

  • Anonymous

    In “The Story of Dr. Doolittle” by Hugh Lofting, Doolittle goes to Africa where he is almost arrested by a tribal chief who doesn’t want any white men in his territory. Later on, they calsh again, but Doolittle escapes with the help of Prince Bumpo in exchange for bleaching his (the Prince’s) face white. The Prince had a desire to be a white fairy-tale kind of prince. In any case, the Prince is criticized by the author for his belief that getting bleached will make him white.

  • Shadrack Bond

    Our liberal foes must have never read the Sherlock Holmes story…The Yellow Face…that should warm the cockles of their little hearts.

    Shadrack Bond.

  • Allan

    LITTLE BLACK SAMBO is not even about an African boy. It is about an East Indian boy–that is why it has tigers rather than lions.

  • Anonymous

    23 — Anonymous wrote at 5:26 PM on December 24:

    I am SO surprised that JRR Tolkien’s, “The Lord of the Rings” was not included to make the list […] It ought to have been included because Sinclair Lewis’ “Chronicles of Narnia” are less of a classic…

    No,“Chronicles of Narnia” is, as the article indicates, by the British-born, traditionalist author C.S. Lewis.

    Sinclair Lewis (no relation) was the American-born, anti-traditionalist author of “Elmer Gantry” (which ridicules Christianity); “Babbitt” (which ridicules capitalism); “It Can’t Happen Here” (which ridicules right-wingers); and “Kingsblood Royal” (which ridicules racial segregation).

    Anti-American authors like Sinclair Lewis don’t get made fun of by the likes of Cracked. Instead, they get Nobel Prizes.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinclair_Lewis

  • Jesse from Sweden

    3 — Anonymous wrote at 7:17 PM on December 23:

    According to the liberals thinking, virtually everything and everyone prior to 1960s would be a racist, sexist, xenophobic, homophobic, and all around pure evil. There wasn’t a real hero or truly good person in America until the days of MLK, according to their logic.

    ——————–

    To make it even more fun, it means everyone outside of the western world is also a racist, sexist, xenophobic and all around pure evil.

    But that would be racist and xenophobic in itself to point out, that the opinions that enlightened and goodhearted people isn’t just something new, but also something distinctly christian and from the western world.

    Or, you know, that it’s only whites that can be sexist, racist and homophobic, everyone non-white just doesn’t know any better…..

  • Anonymous

    28 — Anonymous wrote at 11:44 PM on December 24:

    In “The Story of Dr. Doolittle” by Hugh Lofting, Doolittle goes to Africa where he is almost arrested by a tribal chief who doesn’t want any white men in his territory. Later on, they calsh again, but Doolittle escapes with the help of Prince Bumpo in exchange for bleaching his (the Prince’s) face white.

    I’m confused. I thought Dr. Doolittle was supposed to look like Eddie Murphy?

  • Auntie Em

    The progressive push to censor is frightening. I wonder how much of it stems from parents who don’t take time to parent their children anymore.

    I’m of the opinion that children should be able to read any age-appropriate literature slanted from the left or the right as long as there are intelligent adults available to answer questions, discuss historical context and if they care to, insert a little of their own values system into the mix. Let the children be armed with information and parental opinions and as time passes they will be better able to sort it all out for themselves.

    @ Alexandra re: why no criticism from the left of “The Jungle?” Don’t forget that the book in toto is a rallying cry for socialism!

  • CidMartel

    I just read the Amazon description of The Matchlock Gun, I dont know what “an updated and kid friendly format” means but I hope the publisher didn’t engage in PC censorship. Sounds eerily like the chapter of Kurtagic’s “Mister” where the publishing companies engage in PC sanitization of books and literature so as not to offend any minority or special interest groups.

  • Orv

    I’m shocked, shocked, that The Arabian Nights didn’t make the top 6. I guess since Europeans aren’t responsible, these stories can’t be racist by definition. But none of the books that are listed can compare with the Arabian Nights for non-complementary depictions of Africans.

  • Anonymous

    My wife and I have some of these books but have never permitted

    our grandchildren to have access to them other than upon our laps with a thorough on-going commentary. We aim to have our

    grandchildren perceive what’s there and not misunderstand merely

    upon the basis of unaided sense-sation. The task of our time is to realize that facts–the rawer and the harsher, the moreso–can

    never be racist. The emotions, sentiments, and policy affinities brought to bear upon such facts, certainly can be racist if they are not sifted out within our great first amendment exercise and then subjected to an informed and reasoned consensus of what is and is not “beyond the pale”. We are no closer to this sort of political attainment now than we were a quarter century ago. Inviting misunderstanding is not in our interest.

  • Anonymous

    In the comic—which was published 30 years after Joseph Conrad published Heart of Darkness—the Congolese people practically drop to their knees and begin worshiping their honky masters, thankful for their presence in the Congo.

    So then, what, whites should leave Africa altogether? No more foreign aid? No more food aid? No more AIDS aid?

    Come to think of it, how has Congo fared since whites left it? Or Uganda? Or Zimbabwe? Or et alia?

    Oh yeah, isn’t “honky” a racist term?

  • Don’t drink the kool aid

    Did anyone else notice no. 3? Chronicals of Narnia; how sarcastically pointing out that Middle easterners can be saved by converting to Christianity? Actually the liberal Christian churches thought that converting blacks would make them more docile and assimilated. That hasn’t happened has it? So to the Cracked staffers printing this hypocritical trash should think about what they are getting into. This whole egalitarian nonsense started with the civil rights movement, and trickled down to the churches that anyone who comes upon our shores can be a Christian. This fallacy has been a failure as witnessed in the most recent articles of White churches and black churches being more separate than ever. Also a record number of American blacks leaving Christianity. Why no mainstream articles about this? Well now it is perfectly acceptable by liberals to be swindled and duped by Muslims right? Convert or die just doesn’t allow for an appealing second opinion does it?

  • Integration Anxiety

    Did anyone else notice #3-Chronicles of Narnia. The writer points out sarcastically that the Middle Easterners are reviled as sub human and the only way they can be saved is to convert them to Christianity.

    That is a style that has strictly been adopted by the most extreme liberals of this country in the last fifty plus years. They made a deal with Christian churches of all denominations to be more open to people of all shades and national heritages. Now when they want to mock out a children’s story they can turn the act on its head and make an inferior reference about this same ideology? I was born at 1 pm, but not yesterday’s 1 pm. I find it comical that if we were talking about Islam that it would be perfectly acceptable by the liberals to be converted, but not those evil Christians. Pot calling kettle, can you read me, over….

  • Bear

    A great many of these books aren’t really racist. What they are is “un PC”; for instance; a black character may have negative characteristics rather than be idealised.