Dr Satoshi Kanazawa–Findings of Internal Review and Disciplinary Hearing

London School of Economics, September 14, 2011

The internal review and formal disciplinary hearing into a controversial blog posting by Dr Satoshi Kanazawa, Reader in the Department of Management, at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) has now been completed.

It has concluded that some of the arguments used in the publication were flawed and not supported by evidence, that an error was made in publishing the blog post and that Dr Kanazawa did not give due consideration to his approach or audience. Disciplinary action has been taken and Dr Kanazawa has written a letter of apology. Measures have also been put in place to ensure an incident of this nature does not happen again. In particular, Dr Kanazawa must refrain from publishing in all non-peer reviewed outlets for a year. Further, he will not be teaching any compulsory courses in the School for this academic year.

On 15 May 2011 Dr Satoshi Kanazawa posted a blog entry on the Psychology Today website entitled “Why are black women less physically attractive than other women?”. The School received considerable criticism from LSE students, academics and members of the public about the blog article.

In response, the School appointed a committee of senior academics to investigate the blog posting and its impact. It was clear that a number of people had been greatly offended by the blog and for this Dr Kanazawa has apologised. The review and hearing also considered the quality of the research underlying the article. After examination of the blog and detailed discussion with Dr Kanazawa, the hearing concluded that some of the assertions put forward in the blog post were flawed and would have benefited from more rigorous academic scrutiny. The view was that the author ignored the basic responsibility of a scientific communicator to qualify claims made in proportion to the certainty of the evidence.

It was the opinion of the hearing that the publication of the article had brought the School into disrepute. During the internal investigation and at the disciplinary hearing Dr Kanazawa expressed regret for the offence caused by the article and the damage to the School’s reputation. The School has accepted that Dr Kanazawa has learnt from this experience and will not make the same errors in future.

Notes:

The letter of apology by Dr Satoshi Kanazawa to LSE Director Professor Judith Rees reads as follows:

Dear Professor Rees:

I am writing to express my sincere apology for the controversial post on my Psychology Today blog and the damage it has caused to the reputation of the School. I regret that the controversy surrounding its publication has offended and hurt the feelings of so many both inside and outside the School. The blog post in question was motivated entirely by my scientific curiosity and my desire to solve an empirical puzzle. It was not at all motivated by a desire to seek or cause controversy and I deeply regret the unintended consequences that its publication nevertheless had because of my error in judgment. I accept I made an error in publishing the blog post.

In retrospect, I should have been more careful in selecting the title of the blog post and the language that I used to express my ideas. In the aftermath of its publication, and from all the criticisms that I have received, I have learned that some of my arguments may have been flawed and not supported by the available evidence. In my blog post, I did not give due consideration to my approach to the interpretation of the data and my use of language.

The past three months have been most difficult for all concerned, and I would never want to relive the experience. I give you my solemn word that in the future I will give more consideration to the approach to my work and I will never again do anything to damage the reputation of the School.

Yours sincerely,

Satoshi Kanazawa

[Editor’s Note: Read the background to this story here and here.]

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  • Tony Soprano

    Heck I just returned from the video store and the supermarket. Did not come to the conclusion that white women are much more attractive. I did explain to my teen daughter why so many women from India are so homely. Arranged marriages and the fact that many of those people are inbred kind of explain things.

  • Jason Robertson

    What are the flaws in his arguments? What are the defects in his evidence?

  • whiteraven

    Telling the truth in a totalitarian, politically correct controlled society is a no-no. But it sounds like he’s learning.

    Controlled thinking by the powers that be against the citizenry used to be only typical of totalitarian, controlled societies that had a list of party lines that must be followed, but not anymore.

    Since PC became dominant in the West, we are witnesses to how a supposedly free society can be made to think and speak only those thoughts and words that are accepted as part of politically correct dogma.

  • Anonymous

    Now, if they would only turn this rigorous scrutiny on everything else coming out of their university. Sounds like a case of selective enforcement. In fact, I’d guess it’s not this paper but every thing else taught at this university that is suspect.

  • Madison Grant

    The good professor is forced to apologize for asking the same question that’s been asked countless times by black radio hosts and in black magazines: Why are black women more likely to be lonely and single than other females?

  • Deirdre

    #3 comment, excellent and well said. Also the people will police themselves and each other, as I’ve had to learn the hard way. My son (15) was at school when he saw a magazine with a white infant on the front and the headline “Can your baby be racist?” Thankfully my son is not brainwashed. His cousin (14) responded to him “No offense Pat, but that’s totally racist” when told that blacks are over-represented in college NFL and NBA. Can you imagine that instead of two adolescents agreeing on an issue that faces them both – this is the division you get. It just means to me that my nephew is not a thinker but a conformer. #3 post: This really hits to the root of the problem, the scientist simply had to weigh all his education and whether or not his kids would eat and be clothed against the overwhelming desire to dig in his heels and flip the bird at the school. Too bad we are not all independently wealthy. #3 post spells it out what we are ALL up against. How did we let it happen.

  • ghw

    “It was the opinion of the hearing that the publication of the article had brought the School into disrepute. During the internal investigation and at the disciplinary hearing Dr Kanazawa expressed regret for the offence caused by the article and the damage to the School’s reputation. The School has accepted that Dr Kanazawa has learnt from this experience and will not make the same errors in future.”

    …………………

    To the contrary, the problem is not with Dr. Kanazawa. it is the school’s handling of this matter that has grievously damaged the schools reputaton, in my view.

  • (AWG) Average White Guy

    We are intimidated into rejecting reality.

  • Anonymous

    A few dozen people publicly defended his research and its dissemination. It is interesting however–regarding all the “fine print” of what was brought to bear upon him–whether he is at liberty to inform them in detail of all that has transpired so that they, able researchers themselves, can make rejoinder publicly?? That his research might have been flawed may pale in comparison to the errors of procedure of what was carried out against him–Look THERE in order to ignore THAT.

  • Jim

    Once again the truth is silenced.

  • Ben

    Well at least I know it isn’t just “White Guilt”…

  • White Guy In Japan

    I am a big fan of Mr. Kanazawa’s work.

    Maybe he should come back to Japan where no one would blink an eye at such research.

  • Anonymous

    I really can’t imagine anything he could have said that would have brought down the hammer like this did in our self-esteem and fairness at any cost obsessed world.

    Of course black women are not as attractive to people in our society. Everyone knows that. Whether it is just an artifact of our culture or whether there is actually some biological basis for this, perhaps something to do with testosterone levels, is an interesting question. In other words would black men who had never been exposed to outsiders before still find white women more attractive than their own women? Would white people in the west, without all the baggage of centuries of history, still find black women generally unattractive?

    One thing is certain though; for the most part, people in our society don’t find black woman attractive. Few outside the black race ever chose to become involved with them, despite how many of them are available. And black men are of course notorious for their own desire to date white women. Nothing about what Kanazawa said is untrue or flawed.

  • mark

    Looking at Woopie Goldberg et al, how could anyone arrive at different conclusion. Poor doctor should not have apologized.

  • Anonymous

    Dr Satoshi Kanazawa posted a blog entry on the Psychology Today website entitled “Why are black women less physically attractive than other women?”.

    Most if not all of the Official Righteous Fury that Dr. Kanazawa brought down on his own head could have been avoided if he had merely worded the title a little less bluntly. Had he asked, “Why are black women PERCEIVED AS less physically attractive than other women?”, he could have deflected accusations of “racism” with “But I’m only reporting what other people PERCEIVE. I never stated that black women were less attractive, only that others see them that way.”

    Being just a little more diplomatic in this way would have at least given him some plausible deniability.

  • john

    All other races have women who conform to the accepted standards of human female beauty. And to be fair, there are pure African females who do so also. There aren’t many of them.

  • Sardonicus

    “I regret that the controversy surrounding its publication has offended and hurt the feelings of so many both inside and outside the School. The blog post in question was motivated entirely by my scientific curiosity and my desire to solve an empirical puzzle.”

    It sounds like Mr.Kanazawa is testifying before a Soviet Purge Commission. I’m surprised he hasn’t had to surrender his Party Card, I mean University ID. What happened to academic freedom? Evidently, the equality police are enforcing a strict adherence to Party I mean “PC” principles.

  • Anonymous

    “What are the flaws in his arguments? What are the defects in his evidence”?

    It isn’t too difficult to refute his ideas. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. He wrote this in a private blog? Why must he recant and the university punish him for having a personal opinion?

  • Anonymous

    In my household, there’s a distinction to be made between (a) those who are just too tender to face the hard facts of this sort of science and “know” it can’t, on balance, have any justification and (b) the leftist fanatics who are willing to be book burners and information Luddites, in order to make way for their self-worshipping “utopias”. I do think the harsh facts may hurt lots of people in the short run, but will do enormous benefit in the long run. It’s kinda like a BANG problem now to avoid the catastrophe of a WHIMPER catastrope later. Letting people know there’s an inevitable high price to be paid, let’s them balance their own ledgers.

  • Anonymous

    11 — Anonymous wrote at 9:01 AM on October 7:

    “In other words would black men who had never been exposed to outsiders before still find white women more attractive than their own women? Would white people in the west, without all the baggage of centuries of history, still find black women generally unattractive?”

    History says yes. Statistics say yes. First contacts in Africa led to the necessity for over-protecting white women. Of course, it is old, even ancient since there was always some contact. But even Julius Caesar wrote on the exceeding beauty of Celtic women (Gauls). When early Christian leaders saw Anglo-Saxon slaves in Italy, they declared that they looked like angels (hence “Anglo”) and had to be converted to Christianity. White women always went for high prices in North African Slave markets and they were actively kidnapped throughout history, with raids and single abduction rings operating even in England in the 19th century. Darker men seem to be compelled to conquer fair skinned women and darker women tend to imitate white female beauty. Hispanic females are famous for beating up on white girls in The Southwest, jealous of their beauty and that the males go after them. Beauty contests and political commercialism keep trying to undo this constant condition, but to no avail.

  • Anonymous

    As an alum of the once great LSE, I cannot believe that subjective opinions on the relative attractiveness of women are posited as serious academic research these days. With all the economic difficulties being experienced in Europe and the US, shouldn’t the good researchers at the LSE be focusing their talents and energies on ways to get the developed world out of this financial and fiscal mess? Heck, what are we paying these guys for as you Americans would say.

  • Dee

    The problem is not that African American women are unattractive, its just that African American men are cowards. They turn on their women because of their own weaknesses. Then it makes it look like “no one wants African American women.” When a woman’s own race of men turn on them, it makes the women look unwanted. The same trend that’s starting to happen with White women. White men are dating more cultures of women especially Asian women.

  • Academic Freedom Fighter

    I’ve looked at the comments on this all over the web. No one is very sympathetic to Kanazawa: even the conservatives think he was a bit tactless. And herein is the lesson for all of us: we are right, of course, but it matters how we communicate our message. Respect the sensibilities of those who we oppose. Use the extra word that will soften the message.

  • Jim

    Another researcher apologizing for reality.

  • Anonymous

    I know someone who was a Chinese goverment official in the mid sixties. Then along came the cultural revolution, Madame Mao took over and he went to re-education camp.

    The only dfference I can see to what my friend went through is that my friend slept on the ground and lived on boiled tree bark for 3 years. Other than the time span and the fact that Kanazawa

    stayed in London where he had his normal living conditions, I can’t see any difference.

    My friend groveled and sniveled (asian way). Due to bowing before superior forces he ended up with a better job and more power within 10 years of release from re education camp.

    Marxism is alive and well in England.

  • Nick K.

    Kanazawa is one of the few honest voices on race in mainstream academia, so it was only a matter of time until he was forced into a penitent and public auto da fe like this. Cross the liberal-totalitarian establishment and you must accept the consequences. *sigh* Heaven forbid academics actually address genuine “empircal puzzles”. Better play it safe and just write critical theory-influenced “analysis”.