63% Favor Immigration Checks on All Routine Traffic Stops

Rasmussen, October 17, 2011

Most voters still strongly agree with automatic immigration status checks when a police officer pulls someone over for a routine traffic stop. They also continue to favor tough sanctions on employers who hire illegal immigrants and landlords who rent or sell to them.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 63% of Likely U.S. Voters say if a police officer pulls someone over for a traffic violation, the officer should automatically check to see if that person is in the country legally. Thirty-one percent (31%) disagree.

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  • Question Diversity

    Part of the reason why (at least) 5 in 8 people favor this measure, and similar margins (at least) support legislative packages like Arizona’s and Alabama’s on immigration, is that most people think that the things those laws specify are things that are already happening. I think most of the 63% who support immigration checks on routine traffic stops are shocked to find out that they don’t already happen in most instances.

  • Blaak Obongo

    I doesn’t matter what 63%–or any percent–of The People want.

    Wave the flag all you want, but we don’t live in a democracy. The Ruling Elites have decided what we’re going to get, and to them, that means the question is already settled, to their satisfaction.

    All the polls and all the televised “debates” mean nothing at all. The Imperium has decreed what’s good for us.

    The only remaining question is: are we going to take it?

  • Sincerely Concerned

    Blaak Obongo, you’re entirely correct.

    My boyfriend pointed out to a very liberal friend of ours recently that if he’d notice (meaning, if he would pay attention to news stories and citizen videos of town hall meetings), politicians tell their constituents what they want, and not the other way around. This is therefore, not a democracy, not even a republic, but a dictatorship.

    When the people got tired of being TOLD what they want, they became more active in attending these meetings and became even more outspoken when they were there. So, what happened? The politicians stopped holding town hall meetings. This goes for local politics as well as state and US senators and representatives.

    Politicians don’t ask their constituents what they want anymore, nor do they even show up to tell us, because they know we have caught on to them. What we will do, then, is VOTE THEM OUT OF OFFICE. Please, I implore each dear reader here and everyone, do not abstain from voting. It is perhaps the one thing we can do to get what we want and need in this country.

  • Anonymous

    If this law is passed the courts will strike it down. Do any Judges read this site? Tell me, do Judges write their own findings any more or do the ACLU NAACP ADL SPLC NOW attorneys write all the orders?

  • Salt

    With the growth of big brother, in particular automatic license plate recognition systems — we could really clean house with this type of system IF ICE would actually deport the people picked up, and not just release them back out onto the street with the equivalent of a ticket with a court date years into the future.

    If we keep licenses restricted, it would merely be a matter of checking the plates for stolen, expired, driver suspended, no license, no insurance, and the occasional match of vehicle. It would be like shooting fish in a barrel as far as an immigration enforcement tool in my immediate area. Although a lot of drivers are here are licensing their cars in nearby Illinois to avoid showing up in the system.

    Those license plate readers are a bit scary, especially when tied into the recently suspended (usually for child support, which is a real hardship in a down economy), and no insurance databases. They can scan a hundred plates a minute without breaking a sweat in the right conditions, and with the typical adherence to our laws that illegals have, it would catch about half of them in no time at all.

  • Fritz

    The other day I bought some nonprescription cold and sinus medicine and had to show a driver’s license, agree to a 200+ word vouchure promising that I would not use me medicine to make illegal drugs and have my identification and purchase record put into a government website so they can track how much nonprescription medicine I buy, and at the same time we can’t require people to prove their citizenship for things as important as voting. What’s wrong with this picture? It affends me that as an American citizen I have to have my privacy compromised and my integrity questioned when I have no criminal record at all. Who’s speaking up for my “sensativities”?

  • Joe

    Fritz, the other day I bought Nyquil at the local CVS and they asked me for identification. I said I didn’t have it, they said I can’t buy it. My kid was sick and I had no idea it was such a massive deal. So I asked the lady behind me to buy it for me, gave her 5$ bucks and a thank you and a good smile. Insanity.

  • Steven

    63% of the people believe in a benevolent government. I for one do not want to live in a “papers please” society. I already resent the unusual, and occasionally provocative, pat downs I receive while traveling.

  • Question Diversity

    8 Steven:

    That’s funny, I for once don’t want to live in a Mexican society myself. Those “provocative pat downs” none of us like? A direct consequence of Muslim immigration. The ’65 Immigration Reform act doesn’t happen, 9/11 doesn’t happen, and therefore TSA Rape doesn’t happen.

  • Alexandra

    It’s one thing to have checkpoints where they stop everyone (which is in violation of the Fourth Amendment).

    I see no problem with checking immigration status if the driver has been pulled over for a legitimate reason, such as running a red light. “While we’re at it, are you here legally?”

  • Mr.White

    8 — Steven wrote at 1:48 PM on October 20:

    “63% of the people believe in a benevolent government. I for one do not want to live in a “papers please” society. I already resent the unusual, and occasionally provocative, pat downs I receive while traveling.”

    ———————————————————–

    We already live in a “papers please “society. Problem is there’s a glaring injustice at play here. If a Mexican is asked for papers, it’s world war III. Mexicans resent being asked for papers when pulled over (or really any occasion) because it offends their sensibilities, not to mention their illegal status in many cases.

    I suspect Mexicans are given a pass many times over because of their known sensitivities over this issue. Do you think a clerk at CVS is going to risk offending a Mexican by asking for identification for nonprescription cold and sinus medicine? I don’t. White Americans have no choice but to comply, be damned our sensibilities.

    I’d have fewer problems with pat downs and “papers please” situations if I thought it were going to make a difference. But I know it won’t…..