Fraud? 248 Counties Have More Voters than Eligible Citizens

Bob Unruh, WND, September 25, 2017

Lowndes County, Alabama, has been accused of having 131 percent of its total eligible population on its list of registered voters.

Another 247 counties have the same problem, prompting the Public Interest Legal Foundation to send letters to officials, warning them to clean up their voter rolls or face legal consequences.

PILF explained to the counties that “federal law requires election officials to conduct a reasonable effort to maintain voter registration lists free of dead voters, ineligible voters, and voters who have moved away.”

But these counties show they have “significantly more voters on the registration rolls than it has eligible, living, citizen voters.”

There are 11 more Alabama counties with the problem: Macon, Perry, Greene, Wilcox, Hale, Marengo, Dallas, Conecuh, Choctaw, Clarke and Washington.

Kentucky has 41 counties with more voters than residents, Michigan 32, Iowa 31, Illinois 22, Mississippi 19, Colorado 17, Texas 12, Alabama 12, South Dakota 12, Nebraska 9, Georgia 6, New York 6, West Virginia 6, New Mexico 5, North Carolina 5, California 2, Louisiana 2, Montana 2, Virginia 2, Arizona 1 and Florida 1.

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PILF President J. Christian Adams explained said that during the 2016 election, 24 states had “bloated voter rolls.”

“Voter fraud begins with corrupted voter rolls. Our nation’s voter rolls have records that cannot be distinguished between living or dead; citizen or alien; resident or relocated. We hear about possible cyber-attacks, but we aren’t doing enough to fix voter rolls that are certainly corrupt,” he said.

“The voter rolls are so bad in some states that election officials would have a hard time telling the difference between sabotage and negligence.”

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“When it comes to illegal votes,” he said, “we need to end the Obama administration’s consistent refusal to cooperate with states on allowing access to records of legal foreigners, illegal aliens and the Justice Department’s refusal to require states to maintain clear voter lists if they accept federal funds for voting purposes.

Catherine Engelbrecht, founder of the Houston, Texas-based vote-monitoring nonprofit True the Vote, told WND “no one knows how many noncitizens are voting, because under the Obama administration, attempts to find answers were blocked at every turn.”

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