At Least 380 Foreign-Born Convicted in Terror Cases in the U.S. Since 9/11

Caroline May, Breitbart, June 22, 2016

At least 380 of the 580 individuals convicted of terrorism-related charges in the U.S. since September 11, 2001 are foreign-born, according to an analysis of Justice Department data conducted by the Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest.

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Of the 380 foreign-born individuals, at least 24 came to the U.S. as refugees and at least 33 were in the U.S. illegally on expired visas. According to the Subcommittee, at least 62 of the foreign-born terror convicts were from Pakistan, 28 were from Lebanon, 22 were Palestinian, 21 were from Somalia, 20 were from Yemen, 19 were from Iraq, 16 were from Jordan, 17 were from Egypt, and 10 were from Afghanistan.

Those 200 remaining individuals convicted of terror-related charges and not identified as foreign-born include 71 individuals who are confirmed natural-born U.S. citizens. The rest are unknown.

Sessions and Cruz received the Justice Department data after months of waiting and multiple requests–on August 12, 2015, December 3, 2015, and January 11, 2016–to the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and State for the immigration histories of individuals implicated in terrorism since early 2014. According to the Subcommittee, the Justice Department did provide the list of 580 individuals convicted of terrorism or terrorism-related charges between September 11, 2001 and December 31, 2014.

The Justice Department directed the Subcommittee to DHS for the terrorism-convicts immigration histories, information DHS has yet to provide. While DHS has not turned over the immigration histories, the Subcommittee was able to conduct an open-source analysis of the names the Justice Department provided to pin the number of foreign-born individuals, in the list of 580, at some 380 people.

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