London, Paris, Stockholm and Berlin are among the European cities featuring some 900 ‘no-go areas’ of large immigrant populations, Hungary’s government has claimed.

On a new website aimed at drumming up opposition to the EU’s proposed migrant distribution scheme, the country claimed authorities in the regions had ‘no control’ over residents.

It also claimed that in these areas ‘with a high number of immigrants’, the ‘norms of the host society barely prevail,’ the site said.

Asked for the source of the information, government spokesman Zoltan Kovacs told AFP on Friday it came from ‘data publicly available on the Internet,’ without giving further details.

The website, launched this week ahead of referendum in Hungary in the second half of the year on the EU quota plan, also features a ticking clock representing a migrant entering Europe every 12 seconds.

‘The mandatory European quotas increase the terrorist risk in Europe and imperils our culture,’ the website says.

‘Illegal migrants cross the borders unchecked, so we do not know who they are and what their intentions are. We do not know how many of them are disguised as terrorists,’ it adds.

Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s government voted against an EU plan in September to distribute 160,000 asylum-seekers among member states via quotas, and in December joined Slovakia in filing a legal complaint.

So far, only 1,100 have been relocated, with Hungary not taking a single one. If Hungarian voters reject the quotas in the referendum, as surveys suggest, this would be another blow for the troubled scheme.

Orban, whose hardline in the EU’s migrant crisis saw him seal Hungary’s southern borders, announced the referendum in February, saying Brussels has no right to ‘redraw Europe’s cultural and religious identity.’

The referendum question will ask: ‘Do you want the EU to prescribe the mandatory relocation of non-Hungarian citizens to Hungary without the approval of the Hungarian parliament?’

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