The Height of Hypocrisy in Higher Education

Derrick Z. Jackson, Boston Globe, December 13, 2015

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{snip} Universities giant and small, public and private, bring African-American men to campus at grotesque levels to earn the school millions in football and basketball revenues. In a figurative–and nearly literal sense–at many schools, if athletes did not speak up about racism or anything else, there would be no black men at all to be heard.

In Division 1 sports nationally, an African-American male is 13 times more likely than a white male to be on football and basketball scholarship. That should be distressing enough. And yet that figure swells dramatically at schools that had a football or basketball team in the Associated Press’s Top 25 rankings in mid-November–to 32 times more likely. Schools where an African-American was more than 50 times more likely to run the ball and risk brain damage, or dunk the ball and ring up the cash register for the dear ol’ university were University of Southern California, Utah, Florida State, Ohio State, and Gonzaga.

Only 1 out of every 168 white men is a scholarship football or basketball player across Division 1. At Wisconsin, Stanford, and Kansas, to name a few, that ratio for black men is 1 in 7. At Vanderbilt and Duke, 1 in 5. At Oregon, Gonzaga, and Notre Dame, 1 in 4. At Villanova and Texas Christian, it is 1 in 3, and at Utah, every other black male is a scholarship football or basketball player.

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Gonzaga

120x

Enrollment: 7,605

% black men on scholarship: 24

% white men on scholarship: 0.2

Ohio State

70x

Enrollment: 57,466

% black men on scholarship: 7

% white men on scholarship: 0.1

Florida State

63x

Enrollment: 40,909

% black men on scholarship: 6.3

% white men on scholarship: 0.1

Utah

61x

Enrollment: 32,077

% black men on scholarship: 54.6

% white men on scholarship: 0.9

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[Editor’s Note: The full list of schools is available at the original article link below.]

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