‘Muslim Men in UK Having 20 Kids with Multiple Wives’ and It’s Legal Under Sharia Law

Tom Parfitt, Express, October 24, 2015

Cross-bench peer Baroness Cox raised several “shocking” cases of Sharia law “discriminating” against Muslim women–and claimed it could even fuel extremism.

She revealed cases of men divorcing their wives by simply saying “I divorce you” three times under the “quasi-legal system”.

She said: “My Muslim friends tell me that in some communities with high polygamy and divorce rates, men may have up to 20 children each.

“Clearly, youngsters growing up in dysfunctional families may be vulnerable to extremism and demography may affect democracy.”

Baroness Cox also claimed a 63-year-old man asked a gynaecologist to “repair the hymen” of his 23-year-old wife so she could remarry a man a who needed a British visa.

He reportedly stood to make a staggering £10,000 for his role in the agreement.

She said a loophole in the 2010 Equality Act allows Sharia courts to practice “gender discrimination”.

Labour’s Baroness Donaghy added: “We cannot afford to go backwards and tolerate a situation where any woman is living in fear and isolation.

“More needs to be done. This is not confined to Sharia law or Muslim religion.

“These parallel laws which discriminate against women have existed and may still exist in other religions.”

Lord Green of Deddington, chairman of MigrationWatch, said those who move to Britain “must accept” it is entirely different to Muslim countries.

The independent crossbench peer added: “We must be prepared to insist that there can be only one law.

“We must get away from what I call the Rotherham complex where the authorities were so afraid of offending a minority community that they turned a blind eye to the appalling abuse of young mainly British girls.”

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