Race-Hoax Debunked: Cop Who Detained Charles Blow’s Son Is Black

John Nolte, Breitbart, January 28, 2015

Charles Blow, a black, left-wing New York Times columnist, took to Twitter and the pages of the Times to excoriate Yale and a campus police officer over his son being detained at gunpoint. Apparently, Blow’s son met the description of a campus burglar. After learning of the incident, an incensed Blow published a series of racially-charged Tweets followed by a racially-charged Times column.

According to the Washington Examiner, Blow tweeted, “This is exactly why I have no patience for people trying to convince me that the fear these young black men feel isn’t real.” Blow also tweeted out slogans associated with protests involving race and the police: “I can’t breathe” and “Black lives matter.”

In his column, Blow detailed what would have been a terrifying police encounter for any innocent young man and his father, but again turned it into a racial issue [emphasis added]:

I am reminded of what I have always known, but what some would choose to deny: that there is no way to work your way out–earn your way out–of this sort of crisis. In these moments, what you’ve done matters less than how you look.

There is no amount of respectability that can bend a gun’s barrel. All of our boys are bound together.

What Blow’s readers and Twitter followers weren’t told, though, was the race of the police officer in question.

As it turns out, the officer is black. Yale’s police chief is also black.

After firing off this series of racially-charged tweets and a racially-charged column in no less than The New York Times, Blow now claims his outrage had nothing to do with race. Blow also attempted to defend himself with the argument that a column he once wrote about Eric Garner also didn’t mention race.

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