Cuomo Has Policing Powwow with Rap Mogul (and Ex-Crack Dealer)

Aaron Short et al., Page Six, December 10, 2014

When you need advice on a subject, you go to an expert.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo did just that when he had a policy meeting on the subject of how cops enforce the laws with hip-hop mogul Jay Z–who earned most of his expertise in crime as a crack dealer.

The governor’s spokeswoman, Melissa DeRosa, on Wednesday described their confab in Cuomo’s Midtown office as “productive.’’

The two discussed “a top-to-bottom review of the criminal justice system and how we can all work together to pass a reform package,” she said.

The rapper built his musical career on songs about his past criminal exploits slinging crack in Brooklyn’s Marcy housing project.

One online report lists 187 references to crack or cocaine on his 12 solo albums, including last year’s chart-topping “Magna Carta Holy Grail.”

In addition to his rap boasts about drug dealing, his criminal justice experience includes being charged with stabbing people and bashing them on their heads with bottles at his favorite city nightclubs.

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In addition to meeting with Jay Z, Cuomo has conferred in recent days with NYPD union chief Pat Lynch and hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons, DeRosa said.

During a Wednesday news conference outside City Hall, Simmons said Cuomo “made a commitment to immediately promote an executive order to get special prosecutors for any of these cases where police brutality is charged.”

“Today is the beginning of the end of police policing police,” the Def Jam Recordings co-founder added.

A rep for Cuomo disputed Simmons’ account of their conversation, saying, “While the governor didn’t promise to appoint an interim special prosecutor, the two discussed the possibility–among others–and a range of options to take up during the legislative session.”

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