Sorcery at War

Graeme Wood, New York Times, May 19, 2014

This nation is flirting with genocide. Two barely organized groups–one Christian, one Muslim–have been fighting for control in the last year, and in some areas have tried to hunt each other to extinction. C.A.R. is splitting in two, with Muslims in the north and Christians in the south. Much of the capital is already empty of Muslims.

{snip}

And if the violence has reached fearsome levels in the last few months, it is partly because a pervasive belief in sorcery among Central Africans has mapped onto and exacerbated Christian-Muslim divisions.

“Witchcraft is real,” the country’s interim president, Catherine Samba-Panza, assured me during an interview at her home in Bangui in late March.

Ms. Samba-Panza, a lawyer, said she knew as much because sorcery “is against the law, and the courts try people for it.” Before the war, the Central African legal system was clogged with cases against the “practice of charlatanism and sorcery.” Lawyers told me P.C.S. is the country’s most commonly prosecuted crime. Some 60 percent of female prisoners were sent to jail for witchcraft.

Central Africans invoke sorcery by others to explain puzzling or adverse events–a roof’s collapse, a long-term illness, a helicopter crash. In times of war, witchcraft is a force to be marshaled for self-protection or greater strength in battle.

In western C.A.R., where some Christian militias originated, money-making can generate profound suspicion. In some cases the rich are thought to enslave the souls of others, and profit from their work while they sleep. (The victims report feeling inexplicably tired.) Muslims, long the country’s commercial backbone, have been accused of occult crimes, including trafficking in human body parts.

Now sorcery shapes the fighting ethic of the Christian militias, known as the “anti-balaka.” The name is a pun: In the national language Sango, balaka means machete, and in French, balles-AK refers to bullets from AK-47’s. Anti-balaka fighters initiate one another in rituals to immunize themselves against the effects of both weapons.

{snip}

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  • David Ashton

    An issue for our feminists to take up when they have tired of campaigning for lesbian “marriages” and abortion-on-demand.

    • Alexandra1973

      Feminism is tied in to witchcraft to begin with.

      • David Ashton

        Some of them interpret the medieval witch-hunts as a persecution of females. Among the well-written few histories by feminists I have read was one that developed the “femicide” theme in Europe and cited in a deadpan footnote the pagan death-toll statistics provided by a German police authority H. Himmler!

        • Katherine McChesney

          My ancestor was the Sheriff of Waterford (Poore was his name) and his wife was burned at the stake for being a witch when, in fact, she probably only knew about the medicinal properties of herbs and spices.

          • Kenner

            Thank god Colonel Sanders didn’t live in that time.

          • Brian

            11 charges of witchcraft… 😉

          • Alexandra1973

            I see something similar happening today. Use herbs and spices to improve your health? Here comes the FDA. Seems like herbs and natural stuff is somehow associated with hippies…when I view such things as God’s pharmacy (I don’t trust mainstream medicine).

          • r j p

            Don’t do mainstream medicine either.

          • SpawnTaviousBlackness

            MY guess is that women that were burned at the stake were unpleasant creatures who harangued people, were bitter, were power hungry, were anti-male,were judgmental, etc. I think people usually get what they deserve, even if it is officially for other reasons.

          • David Ashton

            I have had a marginal interest in this ever since a history teacher at school gave a talk based on Margaret Murray’s (now much contested) “witch-cult in western Europe” theories and Joan of Arc. Some of the “herbs” probably produced ecstasies and illusions of levitation. The “clubbing orgies” of yesteryear, though possibly with a man in a goat headdress instead of a “nigga widge attitood”.

          • Katherine McChesney

            I once read that English doctors, under the cover of night, would consult with these women for their personal health complaints. By day they would administer the ‘acceptable’ medical treatment for their patients. And I’ve heard that a number of herbs would produce hallucinations and ‘ecstasies’.

            Interesting that the family of actress Tuesday Weld was part of a witchcraft coven in England.

      • SpawnTaviousBlackness

        People who are hungry for power are attracted to witchcraft. There is a word for such females that rhymes with witch but starts with a “b”.

      • Dr. DA

        Hillary Clinton

        Nancy Pelosi

        Mitchel (Michelle) O Bongo

        Oprah Winfrey

        Just to name a few are witches of the highest order.

    • Whitetrashgang

      We should ship,I mean give a all expenses paid trip to any feminist who wants to go there. Then they can get aborted on demand.

      • NeanderthalDNA

        I’m a big fan of fantasy and swords and sorcery, so when I saw this article juxtaposed with some subSaharan African “nation”, I knew I was in for a treat!

        But then I got busy last night and didn’t get around to fishing Amren until today, and honestly still have not read the article, not sure I will. I prefer to think of Solomon Kane or Alan Quartermain or even Conan himself, shootin and hackin their way through savage infested hellholes, Juju zombies, crazy baby eating black sorceresses…

        But I’m guessing the article is just about some 70 avg IQ subSaharan African Negroes and their continuing, doomed, struggle to be White.

        • Whitetrashgang

          I still like the penis theft myself.So Mabooshka going to the dance hall party Saturday night? I cant someone stole my penis and I cant find it.Well that’s to bad maybe you will get it back in time for the soccer match.

  • JackKrak

    The white man built ships that crossed vast oceans, recognized that he could use the stars to navigate and developed tools and methods to enable him to do so.

    And when he used them, he found a continent where people still lived as they did at the dawn of history.

    Not that we’re supposed to draw any conclusions from that….

    • SpawnTaviousBlackness

      but…but….but…. the black man could levitate, until the white man stole his pineal gland…. at least that is what some black people are saying and actually believe

  • What do you get when you mash up Chicago style gang warfare taken up a few notches with Haitian style voodoo and superstitions?

    The Central African Republic.

  • Rhialto

    Note that the Christians are the ones engaged in magic/witchcraft. This confirms what I have read elsewhere that in Africa (and South America) Christianity tolerates aboriginal beliefs. Contrast this with Islam, which does not tolerate these practices, even when combined with Christianity.

  • D.B. Cooper

    You know, wouldn’t a real sorceress have no problem breaking out of jail?

    • Tom Thumb

      you – you – your good – you…

  • Manaphy

    If you look at the black men in Mississippi State Penitentiary near where I live, you will believe in witches.

  • dd121

    Just look at white, liberal females and their views on many subjects and the conclusion that it’s motivated by sorcery doesn’t seem that far-fetched.

  • Magical thinking is typical of the lower races, which includes blacks and mestizos throughout central and south america. I grew up with the voodoo shops of New Orleans a stone’s throw away. Now, the Mexican voodoo shops of San Antonio are just a few minutes away from me. The more sophisticated ones follow “new age” white gurus like Abraham-Hicks, Carolyn Myss, etc.

    Damn, I want to live somewhere white before I die. Is that asking too much?

    • Mexicans use metal mercury to scare away “witches”. This results in contamination of the flooring and sheetrock in the apartments they have rented.

      • DonReynolds

        Thanks for the info.

  • r j p

    Witchcraft is real,” the country’s interim president, Catherine Samba-Panza, assured me during an interview at her home in Bangui in late March.
    .
    Ms. Samba-Panza, a lawyer, said she knew as much because sorcery “is against the law, and the courts try people for it.”

    .
    Quite an astute lawyer. Witchcraft is real because there is law against it?

  • none of your business

    An African once told me that the Christian missionaries bribe Africans with alcohol and medical care, the Muslims with polygamy and child rape. Who do you think will win?

  • Basketeddie

    Wow, these people are really really stupid.

    • SpawnTaviousBlackness

      another word for that is “negro”

  • SpawnTaviousBlackness

    Remember those shows on TV during the sixties? Remember how they projected a few years into the future and how they depicted the newly independent african nations as becoming just like the west?…….. BWAH HA HA HA HA GHA HA HA HA HA !!!!!!!!

    • IstvanIN

      they depicted the newly independent african nations as becoming just like the west? West Camden.

  • FozzieT

    “In some cases the rich are thought to enslave the souls of others, and profit from their work while they sleep.”

    Sounds suspiciously like the beliefs of a certain subset of White Nationalists.

  • SpawnTaviousBlackness

    Creatures that do not have the intelligence to understand the world believe in magic.

  • SpawnTaviousBlackness

    “Anti-balaka fighters initiate one another in rituals to immunize themselves against the effects of both weapons.”
    Some wear life vests just in case the rituals were not enough!

  • SpawnTaviousBlackness

    “This nation is flirting with genocide.”….. wow, they are teasing us.

  • OhWow

    How can this be true?! I mean, blacks used to be kings and queens. They taught us puny whites everything we knew! It’s amazing how a race of people magically do a 180 when whites show up. Blacks are leaders in science!

  • DonReynolds

    Do they have room for more female inmates (witches) in their prisons? We have plenty of those in the USA too…..we just spell it differently……but I am sure it means the same thing.

  • Which is more strange, these beliefs and practices, or that the open-borders overlords of all Western nations are importing this stuff into the West as fast as they can? Of course, rather than running around with torches and machetes accusing someone of being a witch because they have enough money to buy a motorbike or build a house on top of an actual foundation, our idea of a witch is the beautiful blond Elizabeth Montgomery doing too many good deeds. Once again showing how evil we all are.

  • italian guy

    It’s incredible how much blacks are cruel to other blacks, i wonder how many of them there would be alive today without Western intervention.

  • “C.A.R. is splitting in two.”
    –Original article.

    How is this a bad thing? Currently a million people are internally displaced, and will soon be demanding to come to the developed West as refugees. Partition and forced population exchange makes a lot more sense than flooding our own countries with these violent dimwits.

    • Einsatzgrenadier

      The European colonial administrators should have carved up Africa along tribal lines, at least immediately before the decolonization. If the potential for internecine conflict had been minimized by respecting tribal boundaries, we wouldn’t have to put up with so many of these dangerous, low IQ savages mass immigrating to our homelands.

      • David Ashton

        Well, “grand apartheid” tried to do this in South and South-West Africa.

      • Yugoslavia sorted itself out the same way in the 1990s, and Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey did likewise from the years before World War One into the 1920s. Secession movements have not generally been successful in Africa: the Biafra War in Nigeria is a great example, but the more recent case of the South Sudan’s independence (though they are now fighting each other) as well as the likely fracture of both Nigeria and the Central African Republic along religious lines offers some grounds for optimism.

  • LACountyRedneck

    “..60 percent of female prisoners were sent to jail for witchcraft.” Black Americans believe Donald Sterling is a witch, along with few mainstream Wegroes.

  • Brian

    “Witchcraft is real,” the country’s interim president, Catherine
    Samba-Panza, assured me during an interview at her home in Bangui in
    late March.
    Ms. Samba-Panza, a lawyer, said she knew as much because sorcery “is against the law, and the courts try people for it.”
    ===
    So witchcraft exists in those benighted countries where it’s illegal, and presumably vanishes when the laws are abolished. It seems there is a simple solution to the witchcraft problem…

    I don’t think I’ll be hiring this broad as my lawyer anytime soon.

  • David Ashton

    In Britain white women are the main demanders. And there is a left-inspired cult of childlessness among educated women, led by The Observer. The left here is against the throw-away consumer society, except for helpless and innocent and healthy white babies. The communist hammer in the