Big Wad of Foreign Aid Comes from Arabs to U.S.

Rajiv Chandrasekaran, Seattle Times, February 17, 2013

Two weeks after a mile-wide tornado tore through this city [Joplin, MO], killing 161 people and rendering a landscape of apocalyptic devastation, the public school district received a telephone call from a man working for the United Arab Emirates Embassy in Washington.

“Tell me what you need,” the embassy staffer said.

Six schools, including the city’s sole high school, had been destroyed in the May 2011 disaster. Insurance would cover the construction of new buildings, but administrators were scrambling to replace all the books that had blown away.

Instead of focusing on books, the staffer wanted “to think big.” So the district’s development director pitched the most ambitious plan that came to mind, a proposal to obviate the need for textbooks that had been shelved two years earlier because nobody—not the cash-strapped school system, not the state of Missouri, not even local charities—had the money for it: Give every high-school student a computer.

Today, the nearly 2,200 students at Joplin High each have their own U.A.E-funded MacBook laptop, which they use to absorb lessons, do homework and take tests. Across the city, the U.A.E. is spending $5 million to build a neonatal intensive-care unit at Mercy Hospital, which the tornado hit.

The gifts are part of an ambitious campaign by the U.A.E. government to assist needy communities in the United States. Motivated by the same reasons the U.S. government distributes foreign assistance—to help those less fortunate and to influence perceptions among the recipients—the handouts mark a small but remarkable shift in global economic power.

{snip}

“We spot needs and we try to help,” said Yousef al Otaiba, the U.A.E. ambassador to the United States.

During the past two years, the U.A.E. government has paid for the construction of all-weather artificial turf soccer fields in low-income parts of New York, Los Angeles, Miami and Chicago.

Otaiba said he also has promised New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie about $5 million apiece to help rebuild in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

Although U.S. hospitals and universities have long been recipients of Persian Gulf philanthropy, most of those gifts have come from the personal funds of royal- family members, often to express gratitude for the education or medical care they received. Natural disasters also have prompted contributions: The U.A.E. and Qatar, a fellow petro-wealthy Persian Gulf nation, both wrote $100 million checks to the State Department in 2005 to help after Hurricane Katrina.

{snip}

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  • JohnEngelman

    Years ago in a Doonesbury column Garry Trudeau had a Chinese child ask his father if he could be excused from the dinner table. The father said, “You haven’t touched your jellied duck’s web yet.”

    The child said, “Daddy, I don’t like jellied duck’s web.”

    The father said, “You don’t like jellied duck’s web? Think of all the starving children in West Virginia. They would love to have your jellied duck’s web.”

    • Felix_M

      I remember that strip vividly. It was a hoot.

    • SintiriNikos

      You seem to revel in China’s success and our failures

      • JohnEngelman

        I regret the decline of the United States. I do love China, Chinese culture, and the Chines people.

        I doubt the United States will recover from the Great Recession as well as it recovered from the Great Depression.

        There are some who contribute comments on American Renaissance who look forward to the division of the United States into two or more countries, and who seem to hope that the U.S. economy gets worse under President Obama. I am not one of those posters.

        • SintiriNikos

          I agree with your last comment, but I hardly think these people hope for Obama to foul up. I think we all know he will be a failure, even before his first term. We just hope it is so spectacular a failure that even the lamestream media can’t cover his ass. On the USA separating into distinct unions, I am totally not opposed to that, especially given the shambles that became of the current ‘Union’ since the war between the States.

          • JohnEngelman

            After crushing the Confederacy the United States went on to become the richest and most powerful country in the world.

            The United States is slowly recovering from the Great Recession despite Republican obstruction.

          • SintiriNikos

            Simplistic arguments at their best. The Union and the Confederacy would have prospered regardless of the results of that war. And if you’re talking about prosperity via the Fed’s interventions and devaluation of the currency, this is a false prosperity. The artificially low interest rates only inflates the balloon further and makes the eventual bust more disastrous.

            The US is not recovering, and both parties are to blame. You really should stop believing the Dem/Rep meme. Two sides of the same coin. Unemployment is a lot more than the 7-9% or whatever they claim it ism probably closer to 22-23%. Any increase in net new jobs is more than offset by the number of work-age immigrants coming in or those already here reaching working age. The only solution is the creation of a new union out of the ashes of this one, one with strong borders, greatly reduced government, sane trade policy, no central banking, adherence to the Constitution and principles of declaration, a humbled SCOTUS, a limited executive, home-grown industry, entangling alliances with no other single country, and a non-interventionist military. A man can dream.

  • The__Bobster

    At least the Arabs are buying good will with their own money……..unlike a certain group that uses the money of American taxpayers.

    • NYB

      And lives in that region?

      With regards to international human trafficking and sex slavery, in a recent report, Israel was rated a “Tier 2 (Watch List) category – one level before the US imposes sanctions on a country.”

      Their ranking was no better than their Arab neighbors. Much of the human trafficking is related to Eastern Europe.

      • The__Bobster

        Bingo! Yes, you are aware.

      • SintiriNikos

        Even if they reach Tier 1, they will be given a special slot 1b with some special reasons why their case is different, which will give Washington an excuse to not impose sanctions. And the Amurrican public will lap it up. Or, just as likely, we will hear nothing of it.

  • bigone4u

    Arabs, my message to you is keep your charity and stop rigging oil prices. Until then you are simply giving back a tiny part of your ill-gotten criminal gains. And I think most Americans are smart enough to see through your PR gambit.

    • So CAL Snowman

      ill-gotten criminal gains? What a load of tosh! Oil is a naturally occurring resource and the Arabs happen to be geographically located above mother lodes of the stuff. BTW the Former United States of America imports the majority of our oil from CANADA followed by Mexico and Saudi Arabia at a distant third. If you want to blame someone for the high price of oil blame the Globalist Bankers.

      • bigone4u

        The folks I see running the show at the regular OPEC meetings are Arab oil sheiks, who publicly declare their intent is to rig the price of oil upward.

        • So CAL Snowman

          Yes but the only way they can rig the price of oil upward is to tie the price of oil to the almighty US dollar which is regulated by the Globalist Banker elite What do you think would happen to the price of oil if it was tied to the Chinese Yuan? I’m in no way defending the Arabs, I just HATE the term “ill gotten gains.” Elite Arab leaders are just playing the Globalism game like the elites of other races.

        • Vanessa

          I used to feel the same as you. But I started reading history. Many of my friends don’t even know the cause of the 1973 oil embargo that caused those famous gas lines. The direct cause was America’s “ironclad pledge” to Israel and our unconditional aid to that state. Had we not rushed to Israel’s aid at the last moment just as the Arabs were about to win there would have been no embargo. The Arabs today, just like then, are not too please by our “ironclad pledge” (Leon Penetta’s words) to Israel, so do you really think they’re going to cut us a discount on their oil? If our zionist leaders in Washington would forget about this master-blaster relationship with Israel and play nice with countries like Iran (which has the third largest oil reserve in the world!) Our unwavering support of Israel is crippling us. Next time your pumping your gas, just remember it’s ALL FOR ISRAEL!

    • DKS

      And none of American wealth is ill-gotten ? Get real, sweetheart.

      • bigone4u

        OPEC is in violation of the US anti-trust laws but the government will not prosecute by arresting the sheiks. The US has in my opinion committed war crimes, but so far no one is willing to arrest Bush and/or Obama for those crimes. Stalemate I guess.

        • The__Bobster

          Those anti-trust laws only apply to us, not to them.

          • SintiriNikos

            Correct. Though no fan of the oil sheikhs myself, they are by far not the only ones holding us hostage to high oil prices. the banksters have a lot of skin in that game.

  • Puggg

    Well, for once, we’re getting foreign aid. We’ve certainly bought enough oil from that peninsula.

  • HadEnough

    ““Tell me what you need,” the embassy staffer said.”

    Okay, how about no g*ddamned Muslims in any western nations?

    • DKS

      That’s in YOUR hands, not theirs. Stop being a cry baby. UAE doesn’t make US policies, immigration or otherwise. If it did, whose fault is that anyway ?

      • Vanessa

        You’re right. The Arabs are playing Real-Politik. That’s the way it goes. We live in a Machiavellian world, like it or not. Instead of whining about it, we need to play their game at an even higher level, instead of letting Israel dictate our foreign policy to us. But unfortunately Americans have a long history of electing rotten leaders, and we can’t blame the Arabs for that.

  • david

    sounds like al gore style to me

  • StillModerated

    That’s not the only foreign aid drifting back here. The Saudis pretty much finance the construction of every mosque — er, Islamic Cultural center, in the US.

  • LHathaway

    This is certainly a welcome reversal.

  • LHathaway

    “Think of all the starving children in West Virginia. They would love to have your jellied duck’s web”.

    I swear, I learned that same lesson as a child. Eat all your food because there are children starving in China. It’s one of the few lessons I learned from my father. He was too busy working all the time and in his free time he just wanted to live his life.

  • NYB

    If altruism was an Arab virtue, there would not be modern slavery in the Arab world.

    You take their coin, you dance to their tune. All ‘gifts’ from them come with a hidden price, be it ‘soft power’, mosques, or encroaching immigration.

  • Jss

    Thats ironic, Arabs sending money to help rebuild an area that has a heavy “Finnish” (as Ramzpaul would say) population and presence in government. I wonder if this is Arab gratitude for handing Libya over to Al Qaida on a platter and doing the best we can to ensure the same for Syria. I have to admit I have a pathological dislike for anything Muslim, as far as I’m concerned they can keep the money if they agree not to send anymore immigrants.

    • Vanessa

      I’m no middle east expert, but I think the Saudis and al-qaeda are mutual enemies. There might be a few issues (like Palestine) where their interests mesh, but the Saudis are seen by many in the M.E. as being Washington’s puppets.

      • Jss

        To be honest i don’t know what to make of anything as far as foreign affairs goes. AQ is supposed to be our mortal enemy as well but it sure looks like we are doing everything we can to support them in the Middle East and North Africa now. Perhaps the Saudi government does hate them, if so they should beware. Gaddafi, Hussein, and Mubarack were all allies at one point or at least cooperated with the U.S. Assad is fairly secular. And the U.S. has done away with all of them or in the case of Assad is trying to in favor of Al Qaida. I suppose what may favor the Saudis is they do practice a fairly oppressive version of sharia. That seems to be something out government smiles on now days.

      • MBlanc46

        Bin Laden was a Saudi. He despised the Saudi monarchy because they allowed infidel (i.e., US) military forces in the Muslim holy land during and after the first Gulf War.There were a couple of al-Qaeda attacks in Saudi Arabia a few years back, but they were suppressed and as far as I know, al;-Qaeda has no presence there now.

    • SintiriNikos

      Which area are you talking about? As far as I can tell, Joplin MO is almost entirely White Christian.

      • Joplin: Rapidly growing in Hispanics.

        • SintiriNikos

          OK, I did not know that. Not sure why Ramzpaul would use a code word for them.

  • Felix_M

    If the Israelis are doing it, why shouldn’t the Arabs? What’s kreplach for the goose is kreplach for the gander.

    • Michael_C_Scott

      How many fascist religious texts does Israel send to US prisons for inmate consumption?

  • Formerly_Known_as_Whiteplight

    They’re merely donating money to support the Islamic conclaves in cities, I’m willing to bet. This is what Mexico did in a way in the Southwest, spending money on schools that have been teaching insurrection against white Americans, etc.