Educators Alarmed: Black, Latino High School Students Perform at Levels of 30 Years Ago

Teresa Wiltz, America’s Wire, January 23, 2012

Educators are expressing alarm that the performance gap between minority and white high school students continues to expand across the United States, with minority teenagers performing at academic levels equal to or lower than those of 30 years ago.

Despite the hope that improving education for children of color would propel them to better life outcomes, Latino and African-American students are not being prepared in high school classrooms for brighter futures. While achievement levels have improved considerably for minority elementary and middle school students, educators say their academic performance drops during high school years.

How prevalent is the achievement gap at the high school level?

On average, African-American and Latino high school seniors perform math and read at the same level as 13-year-old white students.

“We take kids that start [high school] a little behind and by the time they finish high school, they’re way behind,” says Amy Wilkins, vice president for government affairs and communications at the Education Trust, a Washington-based educational advocacy group. “That’s the opposite of what American values say education is about. Education is supposed to level the playing field. And it does the opposite. . . .While many people are celebrating our postracial society . . . there is still a significant hangover in our schools.”

The Education Trust says African-American and Latino students have made little to no progress in 12th-grade reading scores since 1994, continuing to lag behind white students. Math achievement has also remained flat, with the gap between white students and those of color widening.

Educators cite these causes for the disparity in performance:

  • Lowered expectations for students of color
  • Growing income inequality and lack of resources in low-income school districts
  • Unequal access to experienced teachers
  • An increased number of “out of field” teachers instructing minority students in subjects outside their area of expertise
  • Unconscious bias by teachers and administrators.

These factors, experts say, produce an opportunity gap for students of color.

“A 12th-grade education in a more affluent neighborhood is not the same as the education in a less affluent neighborhood,” says Dominique Apollon, research director of the Applied Research Center, a national nonprofit with offices in New York, Chicago and Oakland, Calif. “Top students in low-income schools don’t have the opportunity to be pushed further and further.”

Wilkins adds that “school is their best chance of escaping horrible circumstances. To cut them some slack in school is not the appropriate response to racism and poverty in American culture. It is a response that ends up being deadly to the students.”

School advocates say students of color, regardless of class, are frequently met with lowered expectations from teachers and administrators. With such expectations come lowered requirements in the classroom, they say. Students in low-income schools are more likely to be given an “A” for work that would receive a “C” in a more affluent school, according to “Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps Between Groups: Lessons from Schools and Districts on the Performance Frontier,” an Education Trust study released last November.

Students of color are also less likely to be given advanced-level coursework. John Capozzi, principal of Elmont (N.Y.) Memorial Junior-Senior High School, is among educators who call that a civil rights issue. Capozzi says he frequently battles those coursework perceptions, even from fellow educators and accreditation officials evaluating his school.

“They have preconceived notions about minority kids,” says Capozzi, whose students are primarily African-American and Latino. “A large part of my job . . . [is] dispelling the stereotypes of our kids. It’s long been embedded in society.”

“African Americans and Hispanics have been denied access to the more rigorous courses,” Capozzi says. All students, he says, “should be thrown into vigorous classes” and be given proper academic support to ensure their success. If they don’t have access to those classes, he says, they won’t be adequately prepared for college.

Research from the Education Trust study supports his assertion: More white high school graduates were enrolled in college prep courses than were their African-American, Latino and Native American counterparts. Often, schools attended by those minorities do not offer advanced classes.

According to Pedro Noguera, professor of education at New York University, “Where there’s tracking, [you have] obstacles to getting into the more rigorous classes, and the teachers aren’t that committed to teaching. Those are all signs of a dysfunctional culture. . . .In many schools, instead of encouraging kids [of color] to take [advanced courses], they’re discouraging them and putting up obstacles.”

Coming from a middle-class family doesn’t protect minority students from such obstacles. Wilkins says middle-class black youngsters aren’t doing as well as their white peers. Many are placed in less competitive classes, and a black child with high fifth-grade math scores is less likely to be enrolled in algebra in eighth grade, according to the Education Trust study.

“A lot of the time, those [middle-class black] kids are in schools where they are in the minority,” Noguera says. “If they don’t have teachers that are encouraging them, they feel alienated.”

Another obstacle for poor and minority students is that they are more likely than white students to have inexperienced and “out of field” teachers. According to Wilkins, minorities at high-poverty schools are twice as likely to be taught by “out of field” teachers—for instance, a math instructor teaching English or a science instructor teaching history. That, education experts say, is a recipe for disaster.

Low-income minority students are also more likely to have newly minted teachers, many of whom aren’t equipped to help underperforming students get on track. According to the Education Trust, low-performing students are more likely to be assigned to ineffective teachers.

“Some of the least experienced teachers are put in classrooms with our most needy kids,” says LaShawn Routé Chatmon, executive director of the National Equity Project based in Oakland. “This doesn’t mean that new teachers can’t serve needy students. But there is a trend of large numbers of teachers who aren’t fully prepared.”

The result? According to Chatmon, inexperienced teachers inadvertently perpetuate the achievement gap. Students performing below their grade must be taught at an accelerated level, she says. Teachers must be “warm demanders,” showing students respect, encouraging them to be partners in their learning and communicating clearly that they are expected to master the subject matter, Chatmon says.

This is particularly critical in the early years of high school when students learn groundwork for more advanced coursework.

“All the research shows that ninth grade is a pivotal year, for all students, but in particular minority students,” Capozzi says. “If you don’t catch them in ninth grade, the rise in dropouts increases dramatically.”

Poverty also hampers minority student achievement. Blacks and Latinos have been disproportionately affected by the economy, with more and more children falling into poverty, according to Apollon.

Minority students typically attend schools that lack resources. They are also more likely to attend schools where the student-teacher ratio is high, books and computers are outdated and teacher aides aren’t available to provide extra help for those who need it most.

“Young people of color are overrepresented in the poorest schools and the poorest neighborhoods,” Apollon says. “There is a cumulative and compounding effect of structural deficiencies in many schools.”

The sluggish economy has forced many school districts to slash budgets, eliminating after-school programs and arts instruction. Many schools are underfunded, even in more affluent districts. But wealthier schools benefit because parents can organize fundraisers or pay for private tutors.

Poor parents working two and three jobs often don’t have the wherewithal to advocate for their children, education experts say. Often, the parents themselves received a substandard education. This creates a dynamic in which generations of families are stuck in a cycle of underachievement.

Also part of the poor performance of minority students is “unconscious bias.” Teachers may think that students from poor families are so traumatized that they can’t learn, experts say, and so they don’t push those children to excel. Chatmon says that as African-American boys grow physically, teachers often talk about being afraid of “their size” and tend to overpunish them. As a result, a disproportionate number of black male students are suspended and miss class instruction, making it that much harder for them to catch up.

“Unconscious bias clearly plays a role in tracking young boys of color in particular into the slower track courses,” Apollon says. “Unconscious bias clearly plays a role in terms of discipline as well. Obviously, if you’re being suspended from school, all the teachers think you’re disruptive. They’ll have lower expectations of students that have been labeled ‘undisciplined.’ That certainly will have a negative impact on a student’s ability to succeed.”

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  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

    I’m pretty sure all the sources cited in this story believe in the fairy tale of the Blank Slate Theory. 

    • Aside from IQ there is another dimension which is cultural.   Walter Williams has commented on how his 1940s, 1950s black Philadephia neighborhood bore no resemblance to what’s going on now because there were still strong attitudes related to achievment and proper behavior.  Unlike many commentors here I don’t think a group IQ condemns a group or individual to bad behavior.  I’m not suggesting that there isn’t a big problem with the black-white division but I, like many of you, have seen a lot of very bad behavior on the part of poor and stupid white people.

      • When blacks have low IQ its not the same as when whites do. The avg IQ for african americans is 85(13yo child in body of adult), for pure blooded africans in africa its 70. A european with an IQ of 70 would be functionaly disabled, while an african would be like an 11yo child in the body of an adult.

        Saying we are all equal makes things worse as the 11yo in the body of an adult thinks that adults in the body of adults must be cheating to do things. In Katrina whites who cleared debris from storm drains near their homes had more luck than black areas where nothing was done by neighbors. The main difference in IQ is the ability to think ahead and plan such as if I rob the only store on my street it may close and ill have to walk farther for food. The story of the goose that laid the golden egg is lost on them.

        The single black mom is how they evolved in the african tropics with enought low hanging fruit a dad didn’t need to help feed his spawn. Diseases kept the population low enough that low hanging fruit was all that was needed, but when white medicine came the population exploded past the no need to farm levels. Giving meds is easy but teaching those that never had to farm/store/plan is so hard even Warren Buffets son gave up on it after throwing millions of $ away in farm teaching.

  • Education is supposed to level the playing field?  I don’t think so.  If leveling the playing field is the goal, the only way to do that is to give all the students lobotomies.  The article is the same old regurgitated hogwash we’ve been fed for 50 years:  Not enough money, racism, low expectations etc. etc.

    http://www.jewamongyou.wordpress.com

    • Anonymous

      Exactly.  And EVERY one of those tired old excuses is, as Oil Can Harry noted above, demonstrably false. So it’s all a lie – one enormous mendacious smokescreen from start to finish.

      And they wonder why it somehow doesn’t improve…gee, who would have imagined??? 

    • Anonymous

      If people had read “Bad students, not bad schools” they wouldn’t believe the “level the playing field” myth we so often hear.  The author uses an analogy of a good athlete vs. a bad athlete, and asks which one would be better at a sport that neither had played after training for a year in that sport.  The point is, with more education expect the smartest to learn more and excel more and the gap to widen.  Sadly, people think this is a bad thing.  I’m thrilled that doctors and researchers will be able to develop better medicines and techniques to save lives.  I’m thrilled engineers will be able to build cheaper and safer structures.  I’m thrilled newer and newer technologies will improve communication and information sharing we’d never dream of.  If these improvements come mostly from whites, why should the minorities that benefit as well complain?

  • Anonymous

    Educators are expressing alarm that the performance gap between minority and white high school students continues to expand across the United States, with minority teenagers performing at academic levels equal to or lower than those of 30 years ago.

    Since the introduction of integrated schools, the gap between black and white students ‘continues to expand across the United States’ and academic levels are ‘equal to or lower than 30 years ago’.

    Is there any more proof we need that integrated schools are nothing more than a failed social experiment?

    On black talk radio, blacks blame the problem on white suburban teachers who don’t know how to teach inner city blacks and have no understanding of their needs and ‘culture’.

    Yet they continue to demand integrated schools. These people blame whites for the problem while they insist that whites are the solution.

    As I always say concerning blacks, it’s damned if you do and damned if you don’t. You can’t win and you will be vilified by blacks when THEY don’t meet their own expectations.

    • Anonymous

      Paul Kersey wrote a recent column along these same lines but as regards the Tuskegee Airmen.  His argument is that such a squadron could never have existed without segregation.  If they’d been forced to compete individually with White pilots they never would have passed the selection process.  And wouldn’t you know it, today Black fighter pilots are the Loch Ness Monsters of the military.  Everyone “knows” they exist, but nobody’s ever seen one.

  • Most of this article hints around or states outright the old theory of expectation bias (“the soft bigotry of low expectations”).  In other words, blacks don’t do as well because their “white racist teachers” don’t expect them to do as well, so they give them easier work and higher grades for lower quality production.

    To the extent that this has been studied using the scientific method, (and it has not been studied much), there is no expectation bias.

    If there are lower standards for blacks, it is done in order to give them diplomas and degrees when they would otherwise not be able to earn them.

    What does this mean?

    Soft bigots of the world, unite!

    Also, 30 years ago was 1982.  There was no de jure school segregation then, and in fact, there were plenty of Federal court ordered intra-district deseg schemes.  The next year, a Federal judge ordered a massive INTER-district deseg program between St. Louis’s urban district and its suburbs.  Two years after that, was another infamous judge who ordered the Kansas City spending boondoggle.

    • Anonymous

      in baltimore city schools if the white teacher gives less then a b on anything to a black the blacks threaten her call her a white b…… and smash out her car windows

  • Anonymous

    its hard for the teens and YOUTH to focus and concentrate on schoolwork with all those white victims walking around just waiting for a beatdown for fun and sport .

  • Anonymous

    According to a recent study by left wing academics, poor white kids academically outperform  wealthy blacks, and they’re completely mystified as to why.

    That’s the way it has always been,  just as the white group I.Q. average has always been at least 15 points higher than the black group average.

    Although there is a wealth of research material published revealing the I.Q. differences between blacks and other racial groups, rabid leftist social engineers have refused to recognize any of it as valid,  preferring to ignorantly believe I.Q. doesn’t matter or that it is  strictly influenced by environment  and diet.

    When their own research reinforces what they reject, they seem perplexed as to the reason their bizarre theories don’t prove correct.

    In the real world that’s called stupidity.  And people so afflicted are aptly called educated idiots.

  • Anonymous

    I guess the grand plan of dumbing down the white students to hide the deficiency’s of black and hispanics isn’t working out as well as some of these “educators” had hoped. And of course the same old tired excuses are pulled out like “lack of resourses”, i.e. money and “bias”. And as usual it’s never the fault of “students of color”, they’re always given a pass while the blame gets shifted elsewhere.

  • Anonymous

    My experience as a teacher in Chicago public schools has been that the majority of Hispanics does not value education at all (I won’t even comment on my experience with blacks). The taxpayer is dishing out hundreds of billions but these students have zero appreciation for the sacrifice. They just don’t want to be in school . Considering that Hispanics are a rapidly growing minority, this bodes ill for the future of this country.

    • I can’t even begin to imagine what we will look like when Hispanics gain complete political control in various Southwest states.  There will always be a few that achieve but overall it will sink like a rock.  Asian immigration to California may be the thing that saves it as the “new Americans” value achievement and education.

  • Oil Can Harry

    Your opening sentence sums it up : “None of this is true”. I mean EVERY single paragraph in that article explaining away the achievement gap is demonstrably false.

    I’m just grateful they forgot to include their trendiest new excuse for black failure: “the achievement gap”. Or are even they souring on that crackpot theory?

  • Oil Can Harry

    It figures they spoke “in hushed tones”. Whenever a liberal is planning to make an honest statement about race their voice drops to just above a whisper and they look both ways before speaking.

  • Anonymous

    I’m truly shocked that decades of hundreds of billions of dollars in spending hasn’t closed the intelligence/IQ gap!  Not to worry though.  Dick Morris, former Bill  Clinton pollster/advisor, now a  CONservative and a Fox News CONtributor, is leading the charge for school choice.  Hand all the kids in Principal Capozzi’s Elmont, NY school  a voucher to go to the nearby schools that Sean Hannity’s kids go to.  Then these underserved students will have access to the advanced-level coursework Capozzi thinks they’re qualified for.  This will FINALLY solve THIS problem and we can all move on to their NEXT grievance.

    • How many Principal Capozzi’s are there?  I suspect that ‘good’ or ‘gifted’ teachers are just as scarce as ‘good’ or ‘gifted’ performers in any profession except some of the really top echelong professions where everyone more or less has to be gifted; e.g. neurosurgery.

  • Anonymous

    As sure as the sun raises in the east a minority education gap article appears in Amren as given to us from the MSM.  It’s almost like it’s a regular scheduled feature.  Same gap and the same excuses.  I’d like to dump a moving van full of these articles from the past 30-years at a NEA conference in the convention center lobby.  Hey guys, 30 years same problem you guys give the same excuses and solutions but never any improvement.  Could it be, just maybe, just a teeny wee bit that just like physical characteristics, intelligence is heritable? Oh God never say that, it would tear down the whole education/government industrial complex, someone might actually lose there job for life. 

  • Anonymous

    It’s not embedded in society. It’s learned from direct contact and experience.

    When I went to an integrated middle school, I had no preconceived ‘society embedded’ notions about blacks. I learned them all by myself through direct contact and experience.

    The only people who taught me racial awareness were blacks.

  • Anonymous

    My father is retired from a major state university. He was a tenured professor of Biology for more that 35 years. As a professor he was your typical ivory tower liberal. He once admitted to me, quietly and in a hushed voice that blacks struggle in his classes and don’t do well. Very few of them even complete the class. They can’t hack it and just drop out.

  • Anonymous

    Another obstacle for poor and minority students is that they are more likely than white students to have inexperienced and “out of field” teachers. According to Wilkins, minorities at high-poverty schools are twice as likely to be taught by “out of field” teachers—for instance, a math instructor teaching English or a science instructor teaching history. 
    – Teresa Wiltz, America’s Wire, January 23, 2012
     
    ————–
     
    Those who can teach mathematics and science have an easier time finding teaching positions, so it is more likely to be the other way around. 
     
    Also, the reason inexperienced teachers are more likely to teach black and Hispanic students is because few experienced teachers want to. This is because black and Hispanic students tend to be less intelligent and well behaved. Often they are dangerous to be with. The inexperienced teachers transfer to schools where students behave and perform adequately, or they get burned out and quit. 
     
    The problem is not income but race. Poor Oriental students behave and perform at least as well as affluent whites. 

  • Anonymous

    How much longer will this lying continue? When will it be safe to say in public that it is not possible to teach the illegitimate children of unmarried welfare mothers, prostitutes, drug dealers, and violent street criminals? 

  • Anonymous

    I think this same article is used hundreds of times a year &  just updated from time to time with new cities and names inserted.

    Are “educators” really “allarmed” at this? Really? I would think that spending a certain amount of time in a classroom – say, 15 minutes – would prepare you for this kind of “alarming” news about lack of minority achievement and ability. Presumably many of the teachers and administrators invovled have spend considerably more  than 15 minutes in a classroom and thus should be well beyond the point of being capable of being shocked by the “performance gap”.

    • Bon, From the Land of Babble

      Jack, with all due respect, we “educators” on the front lines (teachers, administrators, counselors and deans), those who ACTUALLY work with students, well know the shortcomings of blacks and Hispanics — but we also know we are forced to accept the singular DOGMA of the government educational system.    —   lest we get “Watsoned.”

      These lies:

      1.  No such thing as IQ, all students are equally capable of succeeding equally.

      2.  All cultures are equally valid and the same, one can be interchanged for another.

      3.  Men and women are of equal intelligence.

      come out of the Ivory Towers of elite universities and lefty think tanks and are disseminated by the likes of Ayers and his textbooks in ed schools then passed on and reported by a complicit media.

      Any variance from this doctrine is considered heresy and overt racism and the dissenter is open to real consequences. (Larry Summers, James Watson).

      Articles such as the above appear regularly in mainstream papers and on the news, but how often does ANYONE see an article rebutting or questioning these overt lies?  Do any of Rushton, Jensen, Lynn or Murray’s articles ever appear in the mainstream?

      One of many reasons why the attrition rate for teachers is approximately 50% the first five years, mostly during the first three years.  It’s hard to live a lie, I’ve seen it destroy many fine teachers.  To survive,  I’ve learned to live around it.

      Bon

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, that’s a fair point – I know that many people inside the belly of the beast have to keep their heads down & their mouths shut for self-preservation and ladder-climbing reasons. I just wish that we didn’t have to go through this ridiculous kabuki theater where everyone in the education establishment pretends to be shocked that the sun keeps rising in the east every morning.  

    • Anonymous

      You’re right!!  I read the California version of this article a couple of weeks ago!!

  • Anonymous

    Of course, most of the entrants to the US workforce in the future years will be blacks or hispanics.Whites will be an ever decreasing proportion of the workforce.
     A modern hi-tech, high productivity economy in today’s ultra competitive world (think of the untold millions of good Chinese STEM graduates), will crucially rely on a technocratic elite for growth (and definitely NOT grunt labor as some know-nothing ‘economists’ keep harping on about).
     These statistic bode very heavily for the US future.

  • Educators cite these causes for the disparity in performance:
    Lowered expectations for students of color

    Definitely.
    Growing income inequality and lack of resources in low-income school districts
    Today’s economy is tough on us all, but yes, I’ll concede that there is documented evidence of money going everywhere but the ghetto schools.
    Unequal access to experienced teachers
    Plausible.
    An increased number of “out of field” teachers instructing minority students in subjects outside their area of expertise
    Probably because nobody in their right mind wants to teach in an inner-city school, but again, plausible.
    Unconscious bias by teachers and administrators.
    You just lost me… and you were on such a roll. It’s everybody’s fault but theirs.

    “‘We take kids that start [high school] a little behind and by the time they finish high school, they’re way behind,’ says Amy Wilkins.”

    You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.

    • Can’t site the source, but I’ve read about studies that show there is very low correlation between money and school achievement.  If no money meant that everyone failed than how do we account for some of the African schools I’ve seen where every single student is paying attention and hungry to learn while they sit on a dirt floor.  If money was an issue than why have some many of the great people in American history come out of schools that were no more than shacks?

  • I agree but what do we do about black kids who are smart and can do something productive but are stuck in horrible educational institutions?

    • Anonymous

      What have we NOT done?  Blacks get preferential treatment when it comes to college admission and hiring in private companies and government jobs.  Those that are decently intelligent rise to the top, going to schools like Harvard or Stanford because the Ivies want diversity like any other place.

      The horrible educational institutions are not a product of unions (which can be corrupt of course) but of being run by blacks.  If whites stepped in and took over blacks would cry racist.

  • John Maddox

    A short time back I stopped in at a local grocery store. I had been over to a local park for some quiet reading time and had my book tucked under my arm. The book was ‘The Bell Curve’ by Herrnstein and Murray. The checker was a young ‘Latino’ woman. She asked me if I was going to pay for the book. I explained to her that it was my book and that I had carried it into the store.
    I showed her the title and she replied, ” Well I don’t know much about books.” 

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    “We take kids that start [high school] a little behind and by the time they finish high school, they’re way behind,”

    LIE.  Black and Hispanic students begin school two years behind Whites and Asians and never catch up.  The problem is exacerbated by third grade when the curriculum switches from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.”

    Head Start was created to address this issue and it too has been a massive waste of funds, as all gains are erased by third grade.

    “To cut them some slack in school is not the appropriate response to racism and poverty in American culture. It is a response that ends up being deadly to the students.”

    OK, so here I am, a high school teacher standing in front of a class of black and/or hispanic students, the vast majority of whom, in the 9th grade, read and compute at a 3rd grade level.  I know as a teacher if I fail 95% of them, as I should, and is entirely appropriate, I will be called on the carpet in front of the principal to explain why I am not an effective teacher, to explain what it is I am doing wrong.  I realize my evaluation and my job, if current pending legislation is pushed through, depend on the test scores of  low, disinterested, disconnected students, many of whom are hostile to and reject the educational process.  

    There are many behavioral issues in such classrooms —  such as outright defiance to the teachers’ authority, running in and out of the room, arriving 30 minutes late every day with bags of fast food, shouting and yelling across the room or out the windows or doors, texting, refusal to bring pencil, pen, paper or textbook to class.  Students know there are NO consequences for their behavior or the Fs that appear on their report cards.

    I know I will be blamed for all of it, low test scores, failing grades and aberrant black/Hispanic behavior alike — by the principal, the district, the state, the governor, the media, the parents and the government.  I’m in a no-win situation.

    Solution?  Get the H out ASAP and don’t look back.  Find a better school and switch your teaching field over to electives such as art so you are not beholden to test scores or authoritarian school officials.

    It’s what saved me.
    Bon

    • or get out of teaching completely as I did…..perfectly said, Bon.

    • The problem is exacerbated by third grade when the curriculum switches from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.”

      In math, the problem is exacerbated a bit later when the study of math switches from relatively abstract concepts with concrete applications that the average dummy can grok to math that is purely abstract — This usually happens at Algebra I, but some students are of such low IQ that complicated arithmetic goes over their heads.

      The solution is usually to make math “relevant” or “culturally relevant.”  Problem is, once math gets to be a purely abstract study, no amount of concrete relevance will make a difference.  When math is abstract, either you grok it, or you don’t.  Yes, with kindergarten math of 12 x 5, you can give a relevant concrete example of your parents putting five cartons of eggs in the cart, how many eggs are in the cart?  But when you’re talking about differential equations, the textbook can have an example of a mulatto who solved diff.eqs and applied them to bean cultivation, but that won’t help you do a diff.eq if you don’t have the ability to do one.

      And with this post, I think I have officially used “grok” in AR more than Heinlein ever did in all his books.

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    “Minority students typically attend schools that lack resources.”

    I will spend the rest of my life fighting and dispelling this myth.

    Black and Hispanic schools are lavished with funds and services that White parents can only dream about — new computers, field trips, one-on-one mentors and counselors, small classes, ethnic-based teaching, parent centers, teachers’ aides, new science equipment, classroom supplies.

    How is this possible?  Title I funds.

    What is Title I?

    It started as a part of the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965, allocating specific funds to schools to close the achievement gap between low-income students and other students.   Low-income students are determined by the number of students enrolled in the free and reduced lunch program..

    Charles Murray explains in “Do We Need the Department of Education?”

    “Title I, initially authorized more than a billion dollars annually (equivalent to more than $7 billion today) to upgrade the schools attended by children from low-income families. The program has continued to grow ever since, disposing of about $19 billion in 2010.”

    “Despite being conducted by people who wished the program well, no evaluation of Title I from the 1970s onward has found credible evidence of a significant positive impact on student achievement… A study by the Department of Education published in 2001 revealed that the gap grew rather than diminished from 1986—the earliest year such comparisons have been made—through 1999.”

    Bon

  • Anonymous

    “Young people of color are overrepresented in the poorest schools and the poorest neighborhoods,” Apollon says. “There is a cumulative and compounding effect of structural deficiencies in many schools.”

    The “cumulative and compounding effect” is initiated by too many minority parents who don’t discipline their kids to value education – often because they themselves don’t – and then blame teachers who must deal with students whom any normal person would publicly avoid.

    When students who don’t want to learn become a classroom mob that doesn’t want to learn and earn predictable failing results, educators begin issuing verbose excuses blaming everyone and everything, when what each one of such classrooms really need is an ex-us marine with a very real teacher temper.

  • It’s a by-product of special rights.  Negros, in particular, have been trained to whine racism whenever they fail -which is often.  Ending career and mulitgenerational welfare is the first step.  They don’t worry about starving.

  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous

    There’s no need to. 

    It’s a part of real life, except for those who just can’t seem to understand what it’s all about.

  • Let’s do a 2 year trial and give 1 failing inner city school nothing but minority teachers and then at the end of 2 years measure the kids and interview the teacher.

  • As long as whites and asians are messing up the grading curve blacks will never get ahead. In a true merit based system there would be no grading on a curve & no teachers cheating for the students on standardized test like in atlanta. When more money is spent on education whites and asians in the classes benifit more. Feral unruly black  boys would rather hound white girls than learn anything. Even Ophrah was honest enought to not allow black boys into her school. When they say blacks learn better in group learning they mean copy off the white/asian kid that does the work.

    When blacks have low IQ its not the same as when whites do. The avg IQ for african americans is 85(13yo child in body of adult), for pure blooded africans in africa its 70. A european with an IQ of 70 would be functionaly disabled, while an african would be like an 11yo child in the body of an adult.

    Saying we are all equal makes things worse as the 11yo in the body of an adult thinks that adults in the body of adults must be cheating to do things better. In Katrina whites who cleared debris from storm drains near their homes had more luck than black areas where nothing was done by neighbors. The main difference in IQ is the ability to think ahead and plan such as if I rob the only store on my street it may close and ill have to walk farther for food. The story of the goose that laid the golden egg is lost on them.

    The single black mom is how they evolved in the african tropics with enought low hanging fruit a dad didn’t need to help feed his spawn. Diseases kept the population low enough that low hanging fruit was all that was needed, but when white medicine came the population exploded past the no need to farm levels. Giving meds is easy but teaching those that never had to farm/store/plan is so hard even Warren Buffets son gave up on it after throwing millions of $ away in farm teaching

    • Obuma just said tonight that he wants blacks to stay in highschool until they are 18 and not allow them to drop out. But what of the 18yo still in middle school?

  • The few that want to learn are called oreos and taunted. Sometimes they need to be passed for the saftey of the students like 18yo in middle school or 200lbs students in elementary

  • John Maddox

    The achievement gap and teachers aren’t the problem. Over the last hundred years test after test, and research data has shown that there is a genetic component to intelligence and that blacks and other minorities are not simply brown skinned white people victimized by their environment.

    You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make him drink. First an individual has to have a capacity for learning and then a capacity for utilizing that information in problem solving and practical applications. SATs and IQ tests are designed to measure that ability. Whites have a greater ability than
    blacks and other minorities in this regard.

    How far are they going to go to drag down the educational system so that all people are forced to conform to the lowest IQ?

       

  • Bon, From the Land of Babble

    Every Algebra teacher I’ve ever known has said the same thing: The majority of Black and hispanic students enter their Algebra classrooms knowing little to nothing about basic math functions  — meaning addition and subtraction, multiplication and division.  Other rudimentary operations such as fractions, decimals, measuring and how negative and positive numbers work are far beyond their abilities.  These are non-negotiable skills one must have, is expected to already have, to begin even the first chapter in the Algebra book.

    The schools don’t know what to do with students who continue to fail Algebra despite the teacher’s best efforts.  These kids are passed around the math department, repeating and failing Algebra I three or four times,  until someone soft passes them on to the Geometry teachers — and soon, to the Algebra II teachers, as Algebra II becomes a requirement for graduation.  There are many such students.

    NAEP math test scores are misleading because they test math concepts, not an ability to do actual mathematics.

    Example of 8th grade NAEP math test:   

    Amanda wants to pain each face of a cube a different color.  How many colors will she need?

    (A) Three  (B) Four  (C)  Six  (D)  Eight

    Approximately 28% of 8th graders did not choose (C); factoring in those who guessed, the percentage who missed this question is higher.

    It is WRONG to blame everything and everyone but the students themselves for their shortcomings and lack of IQ points necessary to “grok” math past a very elementary level.

    Even worse is to tell students they have the ability to do higher math (when they don’t) but it is because of (fill in excuse or teacher’s name) that they are not succeeding.  

    It does them a HUGE disservice.  

    Bon

  • “On average, African-American and Latino high school seniors perform math
    and read at the same level as 13-year-old white students.”

    Well, golly, that was about a trillion dollars well spent on public education, huh?

    It said seniors, not 18 year old African American and Latinos, either. So a 19 or 20 year old Black or Hispanic man will read and write and do arithmetic at the level of a 13 year old child. Now, keep in mind, those are the BRIGHT ONES who managed to not get kicked out of school and didn’t drop out either. The BRIGHT BLACKS AND HISPANICS ARE AT THE LEVEL OF 13 YEAR OLD WHITES.

    Any time and money spent trying to “educate” these morons spoils a perfectly good cotton and tomato picker.

  • Anonymous

    In the district I teach in, every black student is too busy trying to be the center of attention, or too busy trying to get into the white girls pants.
    The negroes are always the loudest and most disruptive students I ever have. The quiet negroes are too stoned to function in the classroom, much less learn anything.

    I would like to suggest that they segregate the schools so the white students can learn without disruptions and being subjected to the negroes sexual advances.

  • Amen!

  • You and some others have a Way of Writing I would like to emulate.  I hope you and they don’t mind.

    You and the others, whether ya’ll mean it or not, have a Way with Entwining Truth and Humor and that kind of Writing is Golden.  You may not mean to be Funny but Truth, absurd as it many times, is, Funny many Times.

    And, in these here Times of what will go down in History as the Make or Break of The White Man, Humor is Truly Needed.  Not to make light but, Humor does Lift the Soul. Laughter is Good.