New Orleans Struggles to Stem Homicides

Campbell Robertson, New York Times, December 7, 2011

{snip}

Mr. Dolliole, who was 22, was the 175th homicide victim in New Orleans this year, a tally that matched the previous year’s homicide count, but with more than a month before 2011 was out. Since Mr. Dolliole’s killing, there have been eight more victims, including two men shot dead in a pickup truck, two shot dead in a sedan and another shot on the street in broad daylight.

Of all the challenges facing the city of New Orleans, none is as urgent or as relentlessly grim as the city’s homicide rate. It was measured at 10 times the national average in 2010, long before shootings on Halloween night in the crowded French Quarter revealed to a larger public what was going on in poor neighborhoods around the city every week. There were 51 homicides per 100,000 residents here last year, compared with less than 7 per 100,000 in New York or 23 in similar-size Oakland, Calif.

“From September of last year to February of this year,” said Mayor Mitch Landrieu in a recent speech, after reciting a litany of killings from one city high school, “a student attending John McDonogh was more likely to be killed than a soldier in Afghanistan.”

{snip}

New Orleans has long been a violent town; in 1994, there were 421 killings here, one of which was a hit ordered by a police officer. With federal intervention, the homicide rate dropped precipitously but began rising again around 2000 and has been fluctuating since Hurricane Katrina. The killers and their victims are overwhelmingly young black men, according to an analysis of homicide cases by outside experts last March, and sponsored by the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. {snip}

{snip}

Many killings in New Orleans are a result of conflicts and vendettas among small, loosely organized groups, the analysis concluded, but in nearly half the cases, the experts listed the primary motive as uncertain or unknown. Only about half the homicide cases are cleared.

{snip}

Fighting the homicide epidemic is doubly hard with a police department already known for corruption and facing a major federal overhaul. {snip}

While that overhaul is being mapped out, scores of New Orleans police officers have been convicted, charged, terminated or pushed to resign over abuses, cover-ups or in some cases killings–this week began the federal trial of two officers who are charged with lying about the shooting of a man after Hurricane Katrina. {snip}

{snip}

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  • Hirsch

    “The Legacy of Slavery” excuse has worked for decades. I figure New Orleans can chalk black pathology up to Hurricane Katrina for at least several more decades. Why did Deshawn kill Latarion, you ask? Because George Bush used his weather machine to break the levees, and pinned the blame on Ray Nagin.

    Works for me.

  • Ben N Indiana

    Regarding homicide:

    More black-on-black homicides are committed each year than the total number blacks who were lynched in 86 years (1882-1962)

    Lynching statistics

    Whites: 1,297

    Blacks: 3,446

    Total: 4,743

    Consider that about 7,000 blacks are murdered each year by other blacks. Then, project that number forward over 86 years. Even without taking into account the increase in the black population, there will be about 602,000 blacks killed by blacks.

    602,000 projected blacks murdered by blacks over 86 years

    3,446 blacks killed by lynching over 86 years (1882-1962)

    source: http://goo.gl/Dnrp3

  • Anonymous

    More than half of all homicides in America are committed by young black males who comprise about 2.5 percent of the population.[1]

    Here’s the math.

    A recent study reveals that half of all homicides in America are committed by blacks who comprise 12 percent of the population.

    Consider that nearly all homicides are committed by males, we can assume that about half of all homicides are committed by black males, or six percent of the population.

    However, we also note that 93.2 of homicides are committed by individuals between the ages of 18 and 49. That age group represents about 40 percent of the black male population. 40 percent of 6 percent is 2.4 percent.

    We conclude, then, that half all homicides are committed by 2.5 to 3.0 percent of the population, black males between the ages of 18 and 49.

    1. A United States Department of Justice report which surveyed homicide statistics between 1974 and 2004 stated that of the crimes surveyed, 52.2% of the offenders were Black.

  • Question Diversity

    A couple of years after Katrina, blacks in New Orleans held one of those “take back the streets from crime” rallies. (How’s that working out for you, by the way?) Someone held up a sign reading, “America’s Baghdad.” I reacted at the time that someone in Baghdad should hold up a sign reading, “Iraq’s New Orleans.”

  • Byron

    In the old days they used to have what they called Jewish Lightning, when slumlords and other urban property owners would torch a building to collect the insurance, usually in a “declining” neighborhood. I wonder if I’d be able to get a life insurance policy for every male in the freshman class at this school and just sit back and wait to get paid. Black lightning. I don’t know why the neighborhood doesn’t do it themselves, they’d all be millionaires in a few years.

  • CDE

    The Chocolate City at its best.

  • Anonymous

    The problem is liberal sentencing – and it could be much worse, for example they let murderers go free in Germany (if they are young and Turkish):

    http://in-other-news.com/2011/Murderer-gets-suspended-sentence

  • Anonymous

    In 1992 my new wife and I decided to visit NO for an Easter vacation. We were really happy to visit and stay in the French Quarter, had a nice room in an old planter’s house. We enjoyed the sights, the aquarium, Cafe de Monde, and went to church in the beautiful Cathedral. One evening we walked to dinner, visited Burbon Street and strolled home at about midnight. We were within 5 doors of our hotel when we crossed the street and noticed something was all over the curb and sidewalk. It was blood, fresh blood. By the looks of it it was a lot and either someone had almost died there or was off somewhere, close by, dying. All of a sudden it hit us both, how stupid we were, young and stupid to ignore all of the warnings to not go to NO and for God’s sake, don’t go out at night. Once in a while I wonder what did happen that evening. I think I did find my answer when I read Jared’s treatise on NO and the aftermath of Katrina. I still shiver when I think what might have happened to us if we had been perhaps a few minutes earlier in going back to our room.

  • olewhitelady

    Black men always have killed and always will kill each other in large numbers. In countries where guns are accessible, the numbers are larger. The U.S. of course has always had the right to gun ownership, but in the past gun crime among blacks was much better controlled because of long prison sentences and the greater freedom of the police to search. Now, the best that can be accomplished is to keep lawless blacks out of white neighborhoods.

  • Shawn (the female)

    On my last and final visit to NO about 20 years ago we stayed in a very nice motel. We suddenly became nervous when we saw that the parking lot was surrounded by a chain link fence, and were given strict orders by the desk clerk NOT to walk the three blocks to the French Quarter. We must, for our safety, we were told, take a cab both there and back. And that the gates of the motel parking lot were locked from 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. so we would need to use the intercom to get in or out between those times.

    We followed his instructions, and after about 15 minutes in the French Quarter we grabbed a cab back to the motel, checked out and left NO. We were done. Still are. What a disgusting monstrosity of a city. It wasn’t worth saving.

  • FightmeinLouisiana

    I don’t understand how anybody would want to visit the ‘pool masquerading as a city called New Orleans. I’m born and bred in Louisiana.I have been to the big sleazy a handful of times and I would never in a million years take my family over there. I believe that they should have let that city drown after Katrina. I worked there in the late 90s and all the workers had to work in groups so we could watch each other’s backs, so we wouldn’t get robbed or worse. Everyday I would be asked by at least 50 blacks if I had change they could get for the bus. The bus business in New Orleans must be making money by the truckloads. Every night i heard shootings, police sirens, and helicopters. It sounded like a war zone and in a way it it was a war zone. Look for New Orleans to be the next Detroit very soon.

  • Seek

    Some might say the music and food make a visit worth it. For me, I’d rather eat faux-New Orleans cuisine at my local Popeye’s than visit the Big Queasy.

  • Hans Schneider

    There might be a subconscious effort by blacks to kill each other similar to rodents where too many live too closely in a given area. This is meant to be honest and not with any vilification in mind.

  • Soprano Fan

    Didn’t ex-mayor Ray Nagin boast about “keeping the crime New Orleans-style” or something like that? Sure has worked out.

    To think that some people actually thought when the Saints won a Super Bowl a couple of years ago, the city would change for the better.

    What stupid thinking! The Boston Celtics have won several NBA titles, and Roxbury is still high-crime.

    The Detroit Red Wings won several Stanley Cups, but that hasn’t helped Detroit one iota. Didtto for the Raiders and Athletics, in Oakland.

  • Up to my neck in CA.

    My sales territores are expanding in 2012 to include Illinois, Indiana, Tennessee, Georgia and Louisiana. I have never been to New Orleans before and USED to be excited to see the French Quarter. But since Katrina I have no desire to go there. After story after story to come out after that mess about the crime and violence that was committed is sickening. They sat on their lazy behinds and whined for help. It never once acquired to them to help fix the mess they were in, like the people of Iowa did in the flooding of 2008. I wonder what the difference is between New Orleans and rural Iowa is?

    Some good questions asked here:

    http://goo.gl/q6WXz

  • Gen. Lee

    #9 olewhitelady: “Black men always have killed and always will kill each other in large numbers. In countries where guns are accessible, the numbers are larger. The U.S. of course has always had the right to gun ownership”

    Exactly! And whenever I try to point that out here at AmRen, my posts are almost always met with scorn and disbelief. The right to bear arms and freedom to purchase and carry any and all guns SIMPLY DOES NOT WORK in a country with a considerable black population.

    Every time you argue for more lax gun laws, you should keep in mind that you are making it far easier for young blacks now abd in the future to purchase and carry firearms. This has disastrous consequences for society.

    Again, I draw your attention to New York City , the American city with which I am most familiar with. New York has seen an extreme decline in homicides that coincides with stricter gun laws.

  • Question Diversity

    16 Gen Lee wrote:

    Exactly! And whenever I try to point that out here at AmRen, my posts are almost always met with scorn and disbelief. The right to bear arms and freedom to purchase and carry any and all guns SIMPLY DOES NOT WORK in a country with a considerable black population….Again, I draw your attention to New York City , the American city with which I am most familiar with. New York has seen an extreme decline in homicides that coincides with stricter gun laws.

    Your former contention is obvious and self-evident. Where I come through with the scorn and disbelief is the latter contention. New York City has had those strict gun laws for decades. They existed when the crime rate was shooting up in the 60s through 80s, and they existed when the crime rate declined. So there must be another explanation to explain the rise and then the fall.

  • Anonymous

    About 12 years ago, the ‘Stars and Stripes’ had a small article somewhere ‘on page seven’, that China was supplying gangs like the Crips and Bloods with weapons. Heavy duty stuff.

  • FightmeinLouisiana

    Up to my neck in CA,You said “I have never been to New Orleans before and USED to be excited to see the French Quarter.” All I can say is to be very careful when you come to N’Orleans.Always be aware of the environment around you because you can go from a nice looking area to a hostile environment in a blink of an eye.Happened to me a couple times when I was doing some work in that cess pool of a city.

    To Gen. Lee, I respect your opinion and you have probably already been told or heard this before but I’ll say it anyway, it doesn’t matter how lax or how strict guns laws are because the criminals don’t pay them any mind anyway.If they want guns they will get them.The only people hurt by stricter guns laws are law abiding White people.The only gun law there should be is it should only be legal for law abiding White people to own firearms because it seems that we are the only ones using guns for their intents and purposes.

  • Paleface 6

    18 — Anonymous wrote at 10:09 AM on December 10:

    About 12 years ago, the ‘Stars and Stripes’ had a small article somewhere ‘on page seven’, that China was supplying gangs like the Crips and Bloods with weapons. Heavy duty stuff.

    _____________________

    Awhile back (about ten years if memory serves), a shipping container loaded with 2,000 AK-47s came through the Port Of Oakland. COSCO, the Chinese shipping company, claimed it was a computer error.

    Suuuuure…