Feds Say Public Was Never in Danger in Massachusetts Man’s Thwarted Terror Plot

Fox News, September 29, 2011

Federal officials say the public was never in danger in a Massachusetts man’s alleged plot to blow up the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol using remote-controlled airplanes filled with explosives.

They say the explosives delivered to Rezwan Ferdaus were always closely monitored.

The 26-year-old was arrested Wednesday and accused of plotting to blow up the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol, as well as attempting to assist Al Qaeda in attacking U.S. troops overseas.

Rezwan Ferdaus of Ashland, Mass., was arrested Wednesday in Framingham after undercover FBI agents delivered weapons Ferdaus allegedly sought for the alleged plan. The stash included what he thought was 25 pounds of C-4 explosives, as well as three grenades and six fully-automatic AK-47 assault, a press release from the Department of Justice reads.

{snip}

The public was never in danger from the explosives, as undercover agents monitored the alleged plot and kept up frequent contact with Ferdaus, the press release read. {snip}

In recorded conversations, Ferdaus said he planned to attack the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol using aircraft similar to “small drone airplanes” that were guided by GPS equipment, the affidavit said. The plan called for three remote-controlled aircraft to carry out the attacks, along with six other gunmen divided into two teams, with Ferdaus coordinating the operation.

In May, Ferdaus traveled from Boston to Washington, D.C., to take photos of the Pentagon and Capitol for surveillance. He planned to launch the C4-filled aircraft from sites at the East Potomac Park, authorities allege, and an F-86 Sabre remote-controlled aircraft was delivered to Ferdaus’ storage facility in August.

Authorities say they gave Ferdaus multiple opportunities to back out of the plot, as they told him it would likely kill women and children. But Ferdaus never wavered in his plan, the affidavit said.

{snip}

Ferdaus, who graduated Northeastern University in 2008 with a degree in physics, is accused of beginning in early 2010 a plot to bring violent “jihad” against the U.S, who he described as “enemies of Allah.”

Ferdaus is also accused of supplying eight mobile phones to undercover FBI agents who he thought were recruiters for Al Qaeda. The phones were modified to be used as electrical switches for IEDs, and Ferdaus thought they could be used to kill American soldiers, the affidavit said. Ferdaus also allegedly made a training video to demonstrate how to make more of the weapons.

{snip}

“I want the public to understand that Mr. Ferdaus’ conduct, as alleged in the complaint, is not reflective of a particular culture, community or religion,” said Carmen Ortiz, U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. “In addition to protecting our citizens from the threats and violence alleged today, we also have an obligation to protect members of every community, race and religion against violence and other unlawful conduct.”

RezwanFerdaus.JPG

Rezwan Ferdaus

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  • Question Diversity

    The only part about this article with which I agree is that the “public was never in danger.” That is because this wasn’t a real terror plot, this was pretty much all a construct of Federal agents provocateurs, involving the delivery of theoretical ordinance to people who shouldn’t be citizens or permanent residents to begin with and wouldn’t be if we still had a sane legal immigration policy for a theoretical plan to hitch the theoretical ordinance to remote control toys.

    I suppose it’s budget allocation time, and the “anti terrorism” workfare corps needs to show a “victory” in order to keep its line item amount from being reduced.

  • NBJ

    “I want the public to understand that Mr. Ferdaus’ conduct, as alleged in the complaint, is not reflective of a particular culture, community or religion,” said Carmen Ortiz, U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts.

    Does this man have the first clue as to how utterly stupid he sounds when he makes such claims? Not only that, he is insulting the intelligence of every American, not just those in MA.

  • Sincerely Concerned

    The carefully worded statement from Atty. Ortiz is understandable in the context that Massachusetts must be careful to connote fairness in order for there to be a fair trial, but that is assuming Ferdaus is a U.S. citizen. If he isn’t, he hasn’t a right to a fair trial (unless there is something I am missing). But the full statement Atty. Ortiz made here is also sort of frightening. It wasn’t necessary for her to go quite that far with this statement: “In addition to protecting our citizens from the threats and violence alleged today, we also have an obligation to protect members of every community, race and religion against violence and other unlawful conduct.”

    The way I read it, it sounds as if she is saying, in effect, “don’t be racist, religionist, nor xenophobic toward Ferdaus because we won’t stand for it” although he has done exactly that toward innocent U.S. citizens with his plot. It is as if his defense is already being set up based upon his race or nationality or whatever.

    I hope I am wrong in reading it this way but I fear I am not.

  • Tom in Illinois

    Remember, when Obama says a terror plot is in the happening…we’re not in danger. Just think 9-11 and rest assured!

  • sbuffalonative

    “…is not reflective of a particular culture, community or religion,”

    It’s amazing how they have to tell us to discount the obvious. It’s like newspapers not mentioning race.

    Since Ms. Ortiz assures us this isn’t important, we’ll have to take her word for it. We wouldn’t want to jump to the right conclusion would we?

  • Anonymous

    except when he’s name is Jared, and he ‘might’ be right wing.. then we can link him to amren/ Jared Taylor and anyone who opposes open borders..

    Every day, our public officials sound more and more like soviet officials -making statements everyone knows are in complete defiance of reality.

  • Anonymous

    “But the full statement Atty. Ortiz made here is also sort of frightening. It wasn’t necessary for her to go quite that far with this statement: “In addition to protecting our citizens from the threats and violence alleged today, we also have an obligation to protect members of every community, race and religion against violence and other unlawful conduct.””

    That is part of the ADL SPLC anti hate (actually anti White) classes Ortiz and other goverment attorneys have to go through.

    Remember, police are always being cautioned not to be prejudiced and biased when arresting flash mob thugs. Every time a non White is arrested it is now necessary to quote from the ADL SPLC script that the suspect is in no way representative of his race or religion or whatever.

  • HH

    “Question Diversity” Indeed – well, it has worked quite well for the better part of ten years now, why stop at this point!

    The unctuously PC disclaimer by the State official(Carmen Ortiz no less)is a nice touch too.

  • Anonymous

    “we also have an obligation to protect members of every community, race and religion against violence and other unlawful conduct.”

    And yet we see ongoing violence and other unlawful conduct every day, carried out by black and Hispanic punks against every community, race, and religion. So much for their “obligation”.

  • Madison Grant

    When US Attorney Senora Carmen Ortiz announced that the culture of Islam has nothing to do with terrorism it reminded me of those police chiefs across America who assure us that black-on-white crimes are “extremely rare” and almost never racially motivated.

    These folks must be rehearsing a standup comedy act.

  • Salt

    This reminds me so much of the first twin towers bombing … FBI supplies explosives, blueprints, documents, cash, recruitment, helps rent the truck … We are protecting you from the terrorist we put on the payroll, and supplied. This time we even bothered to stop the plot we planned, recruited, and financed before a mess of people were killed, but remember, we are here to protect you! 🙂

  • Cliff Yablonski

    “I want the public to understand that Mr. Ferdaus’ conduct, as alleged in the complaint, is not reflective of a particular culture, community or religion,” said Carmen Ortiz, U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts

    Why do our public figures see the need to constantly glad hand and pat on the back the “culture, community, and religion” that IS RESPONSIBLE for these terrorist act?

  • SKIP

    ANY muslim in possession of C4 is a danger, and pretty much anyone else with C4 in their hands is also a/or IN danger! White people are another thing..UNLESS they are White Chechyn muslims.

  • Eric

    “I want the public to understand that Mr. Ferdaus’ conduct, as alleged in the complaint, is not reflective of a particular culture, community or religion,” said Carmen Ortiz, U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts.”

    Yes, make us understand Ms. Ortiz. Educate us dumb sheep. Explain to us that what we see is actually not what we see.

    Good thing we have people like Ms. Ortiz to think for us. Yes, don’t worry that every person arrested for terrorism or planning terrorism since 9/11 has been Muslim. It’s purely coincidental.

  • Anonymous

    I’m not a criminal lawyer, just a retired probation officer but he has a very good case to plea entrapment if he has a good attorney.

    The core of entrapment defense is was he previously disposed to commit the crime, basically who contacted who first.

    There is loads of precedent from drug cases. If one of the men on my case load was arrested and the arrest report was like this my first thought would be that the district attorney would not even file charges.

    Seems like he was looking for Al-Queda recruiters. It would not be entrapment for the investigators to pretend to be Al-Queda recruiters because that was what he looked for.

    But the rest of it is classic entrapment. It will depend on the jury, the defense attorney and how much the investigators entrapped him. The discovery process will give the defense everything the investigators did. From the article it looks like the investigators lured him into it.

  • Anonymous

    “a fair trial, but that is assuming Ferdaus is a U.S. citizen. If he isn’t, he hasn’t a right to a fair trial (unless there is something I am missing).”

    Unfortunately everyone who is physically in the United States even if he just went to Laredo for a day’s shopping is entitled to a fair trail according to state and federal laws. Even if he is captured in Afghanistan and brought here for trail he is entitled to a fair trial.

    He should win his case easily. Classic entrapment.

  • Sincerely Concerned

    Anonymous #16, thank you for the information. I was unfortunately ignorant of this law. I’m sure overall it’s a good one but I’m still surprised by its existence.

  • Michael C. Scott

    Whether this case is entrapment or not depends in part on how much intent Ferdaus displayed. The difference between entrapment and a valid case also frequently depends on who initiates contact. Pedophiles who initiate contact online with what they are minor children are not being entrapped when the ficticious 12 year-old girls they go to meet – frequently bringing liquor and condoms with them (thus showing intent) – turn out to be undercover police. On the other hand, if those police initiate the contact by picking “marks” at random off Facebook (or wherever), any resulting cases are entrapment. Likewise, undercover policewomen posing as street prostitutes are not allowed to initiate contact, but when a John proactively solicits them, he’s just talked himself into a solid case.

    Investigators love these stings because they do not require much in the way of resources or man hours to operate, and prosecutors love them because the recorded conversations and meetings make for easy convictions.