DOJ Approves Proof of Citizenship Requirement for Voter Registration

Bill Rankin, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, April 4, 2011

The Justice Department has approved Georgia’s law that requires new voter registration applicants to show proof they are U.S. citizens, Secretary of State Brian Kemp said Monday.

The law is “a common-sense enhancement” that will prevent voter fraud, Kemp said. The law, enacted in 2009, allows first-time applicants to provide one of a number of documents to prove citizenship, including a Georgia driver’s license, a Georgia identification card, a U.S. passport, a birth certificate and U.S. naturalization documents.

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The state filed a federal lawsuit in November to obtain approval of the law. After the Justice Department recently said it determined the law did not have a discriminatory effect or purpose and would consent to its approval, the state dismissed the suit, the Secretary of State’s Office said.

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  • Swarmed in Ga.

    This is a mistake. How did the DOJ allow Whites to prevent illegal browns from voting, and typical blacks from voting twice?

    Seems like a step in the right direction, but given that it appears to help us, there must be something fishy and secret behind the deal. Must have been a negotiated compromise, and our future pain will be greater in some area we can’t now see.

    Or maybe just a crass DOJ calculation- throw the Whites a bone to keep them quiet on the anti-White hatred now institutionalized at DOJ.

    Or maybe DOJ knows that it really won’t matter, because the black poll workers can “guard the change by increasing the intensity at thwarting racist voting laws”.

  • Greg

    Either way, the state loses. Sure, the law passed. But the fact the state felt it had to get permission from crooks like Holder is the real story. Do states no longer have sovereignty? If not, we truly are screwed.

  • Crystal

    A good idea. I hope that more states pass this type of law.

  • olewhitelady

    Eric Holder has made it crystal clear that all the present DOJ is concerned about is the rights of blacks. As for Hispanic support of his boss Obama, it would melt in a minute if the GOP puts Rubio or another Spanish-surnamed candidate on the ballot.

  • Anonymous

    I think it is an in-situ masking response to the perceived threat of Hispanic illegal immigration: make sure they can’t vote and their representative population numbers don’t obviously threaten the whites or the blacks.

    Which is certainly in Holder’s “I -am- the DOJ and I work for ‘my People!'” best interest and thus not surprising at all.

    The problem is that if there is no curtailment and roll back of these illegal hordes the remain a Damocletian Sword hangs by but a single thread of “Okay, we change our minds.” fait de accompli as population build.

    This is nothing more or less than an attempt to control the most blatantly visible effects of population bloom of a hostile alien ethny until such time as their numbers are such a huge sub rosa game changer that you can get a Titanic Effect (90% of the mountain is unseen until you are so close that you run over it, regardless…).

    Since Hispanics are very coy about their voting habits and vastly better organized than blacks, this is simply a go-dark policy of hiding their native purpose (to gain control over the U.S.) and so ultimately serves their interests as well.

    Reading about white technical expertise acting as go-to slave labor for blacks in South Africa under a system where talent _cannot_ cream to the top, it’s obvious what the results are going to be.

  • Fr. John

    Greg- American sovreignty?

    In case you didn’t notice,the South lost that in 1865. (War between the States)

    The rest of the USA lost it in 1965 (Immigration Reform Act/Civil Wrongs Legislation)