Muslim Soldier Refuses Deployment

Selwyn Duke, American Thinker, August 27, 2010

Twenty-year-old Naser Abdo joined the U.S. Army more than a year ago. Now that it’s time to be sent to Afghanistan, however, he’s having second thoughts. He is refusing deployment, claiming conscientious-objector status.

Has Pfc. Abdo suddenly developed an aversion to all war? Hardly. Here are his reasons, as reported by WSMV Nashville:

. . . he said he now believes Islamic standards would prohibit his service in the U.S. Army in any war.”

“According to documents provided to The Associated Press, Abdo cited Islamic scholars and verses from the Quran as reasons for his decision to ask for separation from the Army.

“I realized through further reflection that God did not give legitimacy to the war in Afghanistan, Iraq or any war the U.S. Army would conceivably participate in,” he wrote.

. . . “This is not about proving a point; it’s about maintaining true to my Islamic faith and maintaining true to the American values,” said Abdo.

Now, I would have a bit of a problem with any soldier who, after enlisting in the military, using resources during the course of his training and collecting a salary, suddenly has pangs of conscience when it’s time to do the job for which he voluntarily signed up. But, as Fort Campbell (where Abdo has been assigned) representatives have said, they “recognize that even in our all-volunteer force, a soldier’s moral, ethical and religious beliefs are subject to change over time.” {snip}

Since Muslims have been known to war against and kill one another, it doesn’t seem that the problem is simply a matter of fighting other Muslims. Rather, it appears it’s a matter of fighting Muslims on behalf of America, our little corner of Dar al-Harb. {snip}

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Common sense dictates that Abdo should not be deployed to a war zone, as someone harboring his beliefs would be a danger to fellow soldiers, if only because he cannot be relied upon to execute his duties. {snip}

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