Good Schools Will Be Forced to Take in Excluded [Expelled] Black Pupils Under New Government Law

BNP News, February 7, 2009

State schools across England will be forced to share out between themselves badly behaved black pupils who have been excluded [expelled] from other schools, according to new government plans.

Every year 1,420 pupils in London are permanently excluded and nearly 53,780 are suspended for a fixed period. Of this figure, at least eighty percent are black boys, according to government figures.

Black children are on average three times more likely than white pupils to face permanent exclusion, according to figures published by a Department for Education report three years ago.

Now schools will be obligated to “admit an unruly child for every one they expel as part of a “one out, one in” policy. The proposals apply to every state school in England.

Under the government’s Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Bill published on Friday, all state schools will be forced to join so-called Behaviour Partnerships.

Only failing schools placed in “special measures” by Ofsted will be exempt from taking in more pupils expelled from elsewhere. Proposed legislation also extends schools’ powers to search for alcohol, drugs and stolen items. They can already frisk pupils for weapons.

Tory London Mayor Boris Johnson has claimed that schools “are excluding too many pupils.” Speaking at the “London Schools and the Black Child conference” (if someone organised a “White Child conference” they would be dismissed as “racist”) Mr Johnson said, “Too many children in schools in London are lacking drive and ambition, which in turn leads to poor academic results, high truancy rates and ultimately, exclusion.”

An Ofsted report in 1999 showed that Pakistani, Bangladeshi, black Caribbean and gypsy children were also failing to make adequate progress–although, as always, “racism” from white teachers was blamed as the cause.

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