Progressive Indictment

Randall Burns, VDARE, Oct. 27

VDARE.COM readers have seen repeatedly that there is a big gap between how political leaders vote on immigration—and what the public wants.

But how does this gap differ among ethnic various groups?

Recently, a reader forwarded me this article and another from the website MajorityRights.com using Americans for Better Immigration [ABI]’s grading system to demonstrate that Congressmen of different ethnicities voted significantly differently on immigration:

 

White

Jews

Hispanics

Blacks

A

51

     

B

120

1

2

1

C

61

     

D

59

9

1

13

F

48

14

21

26

Total

339

24

24

40

Grades from Americans for Better Immigration

Now, the some of the folks at MajorityRights were using this to suggest that “the problem” with US immigration policy is that specific ethnic groups were voting differently than whites (that is, non-Jewish whites) were.

And there is indeed clearly a substantial systematic difference in how Black, Jewish and Hispanic congressmen vote on immigration compared to how White congressmen vote.

Still, is this really a reflection of how Black, Jewish and Hispanic voters in fact feel?

Polls cited by the Center for Immigration Studies show there is a real systematic difference between elite and popular opinion on immigration. And poll data from FAIR breaks out this elite-popular division by ethnicity:

Answer to FAIR’s question: Do you want less immigration?

 

Whites

Jews

Hispanics

Blacks

People

84%

49%

42%

44%

Political* Leaders

50%

4%

8%

2%

Ratio

.59

.08

.19

.045

*Grades B or A were taken as indicative of wanting less immigration-this may be an overly generous assumption.

What these polls suggest is that Black, Hispanic and Jewish congressmen are even more different from Black, Hispanic and Jewish voters than white congressmen are from white voters.

Who, then, are those congressmen representing—if not the voters?

Recently a colleague and I created a tool that measures the average Americans for Better Immigration voting record of the politicians to whom any specific individual donates—using the records available at open secrets.org.

My colleague is an H-1b casualty who needed help with his rent that month. The project cost a tiny fraction what any H-1b intensive shop would have charged.

One of the first things we used this tool for was to see how the congressional recipients of donations from the 20 richest Americans in 2001 voted on immigration issues.

Rank

Name

Net worth

(millons)

Age

ABI grade of donation Recipients

1

Gates, William H. III

54,000

45

47.77

2

Buffett, Warren Edward

33,200

71

31

3

Allen, Paul Gardner

28,200

48

28.25

4

Ellison, Lawrence Joseph

21,900

57

38

5

Walton, Alice L.

17,500

52

62

5

Walton, Helen R.

17,500

82

66.91

5

Walton, Jim C.

17,500

53

66.81

5

Walton, John T.

17,500

55

77.61

9

Walton, S. Robson

17,500

57

62.1

10

Ballmer, Steven Anthony

15,100

45

42.19

11

Anthony, Barbara Cox

11,300

78

33.86

11

Chambers, Anne Cox

11,300

81

40.09

13

Kluge, John Werner

10,600

87

27.68

14

Redstone, Sumner M.

10,100

78

28.43

15

Dell, Michael

9,800

36

63.2

16

Anschutz, Philip F.

9,600

61

60

17

Johnson, Abigail

9,100

39

66.3

18

Mars, Forrest Edward Jr.

9,000

70

31

18

Mars, Jacqueline Badger

9,000

62

31

20

Mars, John Franklyn

9,000

65

——

21

Murdoch, Keith Rupert

7,500

70

44

22

Ergen, Charles

7,100

48

40.9

23

Soros, George

6,900

71

33.41

24

Bronfman, Edgar M. Sr.

6,800

72

41.33

25

Turner, Robert E. (Ted)

6,200

62

22

Of course, these donations are fairly small. But they do give some idea how attitudes of the very rich differ from the attitudes of the general public:

The average ABI rating of a congressional recipient of funds from one of the twenty richest Americans is 45.6. The congressional ABI average is 50.

In other words, the rich systematically favor politicians who are pro-immigration—even by the standards of an immigration-friendly Congress. (Even an ABI rating of 75 is arguably not really going to accomplish the goal of less overall immigration that is desired by the average American.merican.)

{snip}

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