Global Demographics and White Survival: What Is to Be Done? Postscript

Chris Roberts, American Renaissance, November 5, 2017

The quest for dissent.

This essay is part of our symposium on “the world’s most important graph.” Global Demographic Projections

We asked our contributors to answer the following questions: “What should the white West do about this prediction, and what will we do about it?”

When I originally thought of sponsoring a symposium on “the world’s most important graph,” I wanted to include contributions from writers who disagree with American Renaissance. Most symposia invite sharp disagreements. Furthermore, I do not know what leftists or colorblind conservatives think about these demographic projections. They may not even know of them; they certainly never comment on them publicly.

Do they think it will be a good thing if the planet goes African? Maybe some do, but, surely, not all. How do leftists think this huge change in the planet’s population will affect the struggles they think are most important: Worker’s rights and women’s rights? Do they think it will change the foreign policies of the “imperial powers” they deride? Do they think that since race matters so little, nothing will change—just more dark people, but the same old struggle between capital and labor, liberal and conservative? I set out to find a leftist or a milquetoast rightist willing to share their views with us. We were even willing to pay them.

Alas, despite many, many invitations, I didn’t get a single taker. Many prospects did not respond. Many worried that writing for American Renaissance—even to counter our perspective—would give us undo attention and legitimacy, and this they cannot abide. I assured them that the mainstream would not suddenly think we were acceptable just because they told us why we are wrong. Indeed, a liberal once gave a talk at an AmRen conference explaining why we were wrong. The Washington Post did not suddenly start asking Jared Taylor to write op-eds. But still no takers.

A few writers wrote condescending replies. I wonder if they thought they were the first to berate us over the internet for being identitarians. I did manage to get one notoriously anti-white professor on the phone to make my pitch. He thanked me embarrassedly for the offer, declined, and quickly hung up. More than one writer was clearly unhappy that I expressed a familiarity and respect for his work. Although one mainstream commenter did admit that he considered Jared Taylor a serious thinker he, too, refused to take part.

Why did they all refuse? I understand that many people feel compelled to say American Renaissance is loathsome, but why would professional writers turn down an offer to refute us? I think Maoists are evil, but if a Maoist publication offered to pay me for a few hundred words on why their view of the world is a delusion, I would accept. Would that boost the respectability of Maoists? No. Besides, I might manage to sway some Maoists, and the world needs fewer Maoists.

Furthermore, “the world’s most important graph” demands comment. No matter who you are or what you think, surely you must understand that a lot will change because of its projections. Yet no one else even talks about this graph. Our media worry about whether a TV show is sexist and about who will get a minor role in the White House—but not this graph. More than any bad argument or silly axiom, this silence convinces me the mainstream is not just wrong; it is dishonest. Unwillingness even to discuss these projections absolutely discredits any individual or institution.

Clearly, we are the only adults in the room. We are the only ones with answers because we are the only ones even asking the questions.

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Chris Roberts
Chris Roberts is the former Director of Special Projects at American Renaissance.
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