Suspect in Ambush of Houston-Area Deputy Held Without Bond

Juan A. Lozano, AP, August 31, 2015

A man charged with killing a suburban Houston officer first shot the 10-year veteran in the back of the head and fired a total of 15 times, authorities said Monday.

Shannon J. Miles, who is charged with capital murder, appeared briefly in state District Court in handcuffs and shackles. The 30-year-old Houston resident said very little, other than to answer the judge’s questions. He is being held without bond and has two court-appointed attorneys; neither spoke to reporters directly after the hearing.

Shannon Miles

Shannon Miles

Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson would not comment on a motive to reporters. This weekend, Sheriff Ron Hickman said the attack was “clearly unprovoked,” and there is no evidence that Goforth knew Miles. “Our assumption is that he (Goforth) was a target because he wore a uniform,” the sheriff said.

Darren Goforth

Darren Goforth

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Surveillance video from the gas station shows that Goforth, 47, had just come out of a convenience store after he had pumped gas and that Miles got out of his red truck, she said.

“He runs up behind Deputy Goforth and puts the gun to the back of his head and shoots. Deputy Goforth hits the ground and then he continues to unload his gun, shooting repeatedly into the back of Deputy Goforth,” Anderson said.

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The killing evoked strong emotions in the area’s law enforcement community, with Hickman linking it to heightened tension over the treatment of African-Americans by police. Goforth was white and Miles is black.

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Miles’ criminal record begins in 2005, when he was convicted of criminal mischief, giving false information to police and resisting arrest, according to records. In 2006, he was convicted of disorderly conduct with a firearm and sentenced to a maximum of 15 days in jail. He was convicted of evading arrest in 2007, and his most recent conviction came in 2009 for again resisting arrest. Records show he was sentenced to several short stints in jail, anywhere from six to 10 days.

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