Scant Details from Gray Death Probe Disappoint Protesters

David Dishneau and Curt Anderson, Yahoo! News, May 1, 2015

The refusal of authorities to provide more than a few sketchy details about the Freddie Gray investigation may be legally appropriate, but many people in Baltimore were finding it hard to be patient Thursday when police revealed next to nothing about the criminal investigation they turned over to the state’s attorney’s office.

Nearly two weeks after Gray’s death, the public still doesn’t know much more than it did on Day One. The central question–what caused his fatal spinal cord injury–remains a mystery.

“The transparency is just not there,” the Rev. Cortly “C.D.” Witherspoon said after Police Commissioner Anthony Batts refused to answer any questions Thursday.

Batts said his department’s report was delivered a day ahead of time to State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, and that from now on, any questions should go to her.

{snip}

A coalition of news media organizations, including The Associated Press, sent a letter Thursday evening to the Baltimore Police Department seeking the immediate release of the report as information that would serve the public interest.

{snip}

Baltimore police have been less forthcoming than police in Ferguson, Missouri, after white officer Darren Wilson fatally shot a black man, 18-year-old, Michael Brown, last year in an incident officially deemed self-defense. For example, Baltimore police haven’t publicly revealed the suspended officers’ races or disciplinary histories.

{snip}

Legal experts and the Gray family lawyers say secrecy is appropriate at this point in the probe, when it’s still possible that some witnesses haven’t been questioned, or even found.

“By releasing too many details, you run the risk that witnesses’ testimony will change to mirror the details you have released,” said David S. Weinstein, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice in Miami. He said investigators must verify or corroborate much of the information they receive, and meanwhile the public could be misled that the probe is leading to a particular outcome.

Investigators also face challenges with police that are different from killings by civilians. There’s the question of whether an officer acted “reasonably” considering the circumstances–a common defense in use-of-force cases. And investigators can’t simply force officers to give statements or lose their jobs, because that would mean their testimony is coerced, and therefore wouldn’t hold up in court, Weinstein said.

“If they are compelled to give a statement as a condition of their employment, you cannot then use those statements against them in a criminal proceeding,” he said. “This is where the decision to grant immunity comes into play.”

The Gray family’s lawyers sought to dispel the idea that the police report would be made public at this point.

“This family wants justice, and they want justice that comes at the right time and not too soon,” attorney Hassan Murphy said Wednesday.

People are right to demand transparency, but the appropriate time for disclosure is either during a trial, if charges are filed, or when prosecutors announce no indictments, said Steve Levin, a former federal prosecutor in Baltimore who now works as a defense attorney.

{snip}

Topics:

Share This

We welcome comments that add information or perspective, and we encourage polite debate. If you log in with a social media account, your comment should appear immediately. If you prefer to remain anonymous, you may comment as a guest, using a name and an e-mail address of convenience. Your comment will be moderated.
  • technodan

    How is it that we now refer to police as separate from the rest of us? The writer distinguishes police from “civilians” (i.e. us). I thought police were civilians as well, but I guess not, especially seeing how militarized they have become. No wonder the founders of this country were leery of any standing army, which is what our police have become. Police frequently now have the attitude of “us vs. them”, and act protect their own lives at any cost, even if that cost is us being killed.

    • Hank Richter

      I was with you on your first few sentences, but then you went into Alex Jonesville there. I’d say the “us vs them” attitude has come from both sides.

      • Indeed.
        I hate it when otherwise decent and intelligent race realists live down to the stereotype of being anti-authority figure fringe types.
        Wake up. The cops are not the enemy.

        • technodan

          Yeah, I’m “anti-authority”…right. What I really am is against the abuse of authority. If cops aren’t the enemy, why to they have so much military type equipment to go up against us “civilians”?

          • The increased firepower of police in recent decades is a direct result of an increasingly aggressive and violent minority criminal element. There is no deep dark secret conspiracy in place.

          • Lexonaut

            “If cops aren’t the enemy, why to they have so much military type equipment to go up against us “civilians”?”

            Because of the North Hollywood bank shootout, and because of the San Diego military tank theft and rampage. Cops want to be able to go home after work just like you. I don’t want to put links in this post because I want it to go through without moderation.

          • technodan

            Once you unleash the beast on “them”, it will sooner or later come back to get you.

          • Dale McNamee

            Could it be that criminals are very well armed like the military, that the police need such equipment ?

            Yes, that equipment could be used against us…

            I have no faith in the Repukes to stop the conversion of the government through what Obama has allowed government agencies to do…

            I see no moves to defund them and abolish them…

            Boehner, McConnell, etc… Totally useless and worthless…

          • They don’t need to use any equipment against us. They are using our principles against us already.

            “Stop illegal immigration? Well, I don’t want to be unfair to people just because they look different than me.” “End affirmative action? But, we have been unfair to African Americans for so long.” “Profile Islamic terrorists? But we must have freedom for all religious expressions.” “Execute all murderers? But that would be so cruel, and many of these people were deprived as children.” “Pro-white organization? No, that would be so racist. African Americans can have their own organizations because they don’t have power, unlike white people.”

            So, why do they need to use military weapons against us?

          • Dale McNamee

            I see your point… And to answer your question regarding military weapons… To finish the job currently carried out by our “principles”…

          • Hank Richter

            I never once said I approved of abuse of authority, Please don’t put words in my mouth.

          • technodan

            Hank, you wrote,
            ‘I hate it when otherwise decent and intelligent race realists live down
            to the stereotype of being anti-authority figure fringe types.’,

            and then I wrote,
            ‘Yeah, I’m “anti-authority”…right. What I really am is against the abuse of authority.’

            So where did I say you approved of abuse of authority?

            You know, with all the pointless bickering here, I can see your cherished “race realism” is going to go nowhere.

            End of my posts.

          • Hank Richter

            I actually did not write that, someone else did.

          • Trench Raider answered it first, but I will repeat, more explicitly: Because, since the sixties, there has been a violent Negro revolution against White society, encouraged by Marxist elements. Of course we don’t acknowledge this, but it is there.

        • John Smith

          Some are. I notice a goodly number of whites being victimized by police from my readings.

        • Hank Richter

          Well, I mean, I do think there are issues with the ever growing govt let me be clear, however, I really just don’t go around blaming all that on the average every day beat cop.

      • technodan

        I see the moderator didn’t like my first reply to you for some reason. It never appeared here, and there was nothing offensive in it. Not the first time this has happened here.

    • Albert

      I say cut the police a little slack. They have to deal with the worst people our society has to offer on a daily basis and receive very little in the way of recognition or thanks. If anything, it’s been fashionable (since Ferguson) to view police as though they were the real criminals who are in dire need of reform. Never mind the riots that have been blossoming all over the country. The politicians and the media would rather focus on the police.

      • John Smith

        They do deal with the scum of the earth, and many start to view everyone who isn’t a cop as the enemy. Some are even degenerates who got into LE to abuse those they hold power over. We need them, but I think the drug war and the war on the American people by our politicians has created more than we need and allocated them unevenly, such that urban ghettos have too few and suburban areas have too many, which keeps them bored and looking for excuses to find infractions that may not exist. I should tell you about the time my retirement-age uncle and aunt got the third degree from a state trooper because they forget to renew their registration by a month on their Lexus LS460.

        • Lexonaut

          “They do deal with the scum of the earth, and many start to view everyone who isn’t a cop as the enemy.”

          That’s true of some but for most there are actually three kinds of people, not two. They are cops, perps, and everyone else. And oh yes, nurses.

        • Dale McNamee

          I was stopped for non-functioning brake lights and rear taillights, so ?

          I was ticketed and advised to fix the problem ( no fine or points )…

          I got the lights fixed, went to the county police barracks, showed the officer, and my ticket was closed…

          If I had wanted to be a “tough guy”…

    • GrimmTale

      @technodan:
      The whole thought is important when you’re asking that question.
      “…Investigators also face challenges with police that are different from killings by civilians. There’s the question of whether an officer acted “reasonably” considering the circumstances–a common defense in use-of-force cases…”

      I believe the author uses “civilians” in order to distinguish from non law enforcement.

  • Oil Can Harry

    Do these looney left Baltimorons not understand that the more info from the official investigation that is released to the public the MORE likely it will be for the cops’ lawyers to get them acquitted?

    • dd121

      The leftist media has been looking for the “perfect racist” to nail against the wall for several years. Each time the story line has unraveled. I suspect that will happen this time too. The result will be the boons taking to the street again.

  • JohnEngelman

    “This family wants justice, and they want justice that comes at the right time and not too soon,” attorney Hassan Murphy said Wednesday.

    – David Dishneau and Curt Anderson, Yahoo! News, May 1, 2015

    What about justice for the people whose stores were looted and destroyed?

    • thegodsofeden

      Nah, you be trippin’ homey!

    • Michigan Patriot

      They were non-black, so f—k them ! So what else is new the last fifty years ?

    • Samuel Hathaway

      There will be no justice for the store owners burned out in Baltimore. The blacks complained that the Asian and Arab store owners in the area didn’t hire blacks (probably small family businesses), and that instead of spending $$$ in the local community, they wired money overseas to relatives in their countries of origin.

      • Tiffany Howard

        ➜➜➜➜GET PR0FIT FROM COMFORT OF Y0UR [email protected]< Google is

        <<<<<

        ➨➨➨➨➨➨➨➨ < http://WWW.WORKREPORT90.COM

        < JUST OPEN THIS AND CLICK ANY LINK TO SEE PROOF PAGE >

      • Maurice Miner

        Samuel, as you can see, NEVER use the “dollar.dollar.dollar” image like that, as these asshole spambots home in on something like this.

        Regarding your comment, you are quite correct, there will be no justice for the burnt out owners. Baltimore has been a powder-keg since 1968, and although I am nowhere near Baltimore, I would expect that the business insurance premiums would be through the roof, or else non-existent.

        I would expect most Baltimore business owners to have been basically self-insuring, and now they reap what they sow.

      • Mary Botts

        ♋♋♋♋MAKE PR0FIT FROM COMFORT OF UR [email protected]< Google is

        <<<<<
        ➨➨➨➨➨➨➨➨ < http://WWW.WorkReport90.COM

        < JUST 0PEN THIS AND CLICK ANY LINK T0 Look PROOF PAGE >

    • GrimmTale

      I’m hoping to see many lawsuits against Baltimore for failure to protect. I would also think inciting a riot would sit-well with those in authority of that city.

    • Dale McNamee

      And justice for the people whose houses were burned down as well, Hassan Murphy ?

  • LackawannaErie

    People should remember that confidentiality in the investigation prevents the guilty from being tipped of and possibly destroying evidence against them. That’s a big reason for doing it.

  • John Smith

    I’m thinking that details haven’t been released because of how few there actually are and how little these point to any actual malfeasance by the officers.

  • Hank Richter

    “Investigators also face challenges with police that are different from killings by civilians.”

    Killings? Oh, so I guess the trials over? I wasn’t aware they killed him? I mean I know it is a possibility, but so far as I know there is no solid evidence of it.

  • Albert

    Details, shmetails. The mob always pre-determines guilt long before the actual facts surface. And even after the facts are known and the verdict is drawn, they refuse to accept. Some idiots out there still believe the “hands up, don’t shoot” scenario actually happened.

  • Vito Powers

    There have been allegations that the Negro mayor of Baltimore initially ordered the police to “stand down” and let the “children” express themselves.

    If these allegations can be proven true beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law, then I would think the Baltimore city government would be financially liable for property damages. CVS, call your legal department ASAP.

    I can just hear the Negro mayor saying “I denies the allegations and I resents the alligators.”

  • RaySist27

    I just saw an interview with Baltimore cop, in disguise, who basically laid out what the cops’ defense will be in court. He also talked about why the charges were brought against the officers. He said repeatedly that the charges were politically motivated. Never once did he say anything about a possible racial motivation. He also criticized the black mayor. Even in disguise a police supporter would not dare say the charges were racially motivated, even though I’m sure he knows they are. I’m aware that three of the six charged officers are black. Baltimore’s anti-White prosecutor sees black cops as uncle toms and would prefer to charge only White officers if she could.

  • MooTieFighter

    The liberal “rebuttal” is always trite, stale, smug mockery and asinine circular logic. Those “right-wing nutjobs” have been right 9/10ths of the time — from the painfully obvious “global warming” hoax to the disaster of Obamacare and a government takeover of healthcare to the constantly expanding nanny-state to the government which now openly expects The People to serve the whims of the bureaucrats — and still we have the same “tinfoil hat” cliches coming from gaping tw4ts like Stewart.

    There’s truly nothing worse than a servile, complacent, low-IQ liberal parrot who thinks he’s “fresh” and “clever.”.
    Alinsky tactic #5. No real argument: criticize and ridicule.