{snip}

Maybe this is a first small step in sending [Angela] Corey to join Mike Nifong in disgraced-former-prosecutor obscurity.

Ben Kruidbos, Corey’s former director of information technology, was fired after testifying at a pre-trial hearing on June 6 that prosecutors failed to turn over potentially embarrassing evidence extracted from Martin’s cell phone to the defense, as required by evidence-sharing laws.

“We will be filing a whistleblower action in (Florida’s Fourth Judicial District) Circuit Court,” said Kruidbos’ attorney Wesley White, himself a former prosecutor who was hired by Corey but resigned in December because he disagreed with her prosecutorial priorities. He said the suit will be filed within the next 30 days…

The six-page letter, dated July 11, charges Kruidbos with “deliberate, willful and unscrupulous actions” that make him untrustworthy and calls his questioning of de la Rionda’s actions regarding the cell phone evidence “a shallow, but obvious, attempt to cloak yourself in the protection of the whistleblower law.”

A straightforward whistleblower action or a smokescreen? Take five minutes to read this Florida Times-Union piece published on the day Kruidbos was canned. If I have the timeline straight, in March the office investigated a security breach of its computer system due to suspicions that someone had improperly accessed employees’ health information and disciplinary records. Two employees were suspected, one of whom was Kruidbos. On April 3, eight other employees were removed from his supervision and his access to the computer system was limited, but he was never formally accused as a result of the investigation. Sometime that same month, he contacted White about his suspicions that Corey hadn’t given his report on Trayvon Martin’s cell-phone data to the defense—although, apparently, the defense did receive the source file from Martin’s phone, from which they extracted data. On May 16, Kruidbos got a raise for meritorious performance; twelve days later, Corey finally found out that Kruidbos had gone to Zimmerman’s defense lawyers to let them know about his cell-phone report. He was immediately placed on leave and ultimately fired on July 12th, supposedly because he had “wiped” a computer in the prosecutor’s office in violation of state law on May 24th. (Kruidbos denies this.) {snip}

I tucked this clip of Alan Dershowitz destroying Corey into a “Quotes of the Day” post a few days ago but it deserves more attention, especially what he says about her being the true civil-rights violator in this case. {snip|

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  • NeanderthalDNA

    HA HA! Sue that liblefty treacherous incompetent. Whites need a legal defense front.

    • dukem1

      I remember watching the press conference when the state announced that Z would be charged.
      Man, that woman was positively giddy with the attention, and with her own self-importance.
      This is a crazy world we are living in.

  • The__Bobster

    The State’s job is to make the case for the defendant’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Fifty years ago, in Brady v. Maryland, the U.S. Supreme Court established that a prosecutor’s responsibility was “to seek justice fairly, not merely win convictions by any means.” In the case at hand, this meant that the State of Florida had the responsibility to share promptly all exculpatory evidence with the defense. It did not.

    One substantial block of evidence that it kept to itself until a whistleblower alerted the defense was the content of Martin’s cell phone. On Tuesday night of this week, phone expert Richard Connor made a detailed presentation. Although the jury was not present, the respective attorneys were, as were the media.

    For dubious and probably reversible reasons, Judge Debra Nelson disallowed Connor’s testimony, but prosecutors have known for many months about the downward spiral of Martin’s life. In the course of his close, de la Rionda called Martin an “innocent young boy” and made several other allusions to that effect. He was intentionally deceiving the jury. Martin was neither little nor innocent.

  • The__Bobster

    On May 16, Kruidbos got a raise for meritorious performance; twelve days later, Corey finally found out that Kruidbos had gone to Zimmerman’s defense lawyers to let them know about his cell-phone report. He was immediately placed on leave and ultimately fired on July 12th, supposedly because he had “wiped” a computer in the prosecutor’s office in violation of state law on May 24th. (Kruidbos denies this.)

    ______

    Kruidbos was obviously railroaded. He should get a huge settlement and Corey should be sent back to Camelandia.

    • Corey should be Nifong-ed.

      • She’ll likely receive worse than he did; Corey has been indicted for fraud over the concealed evidence, a felony. This would be more serious than merely losing her law license.

        With her having fired Ben Kruidbos over the matter, she will not be able to claim that withholding the evidence during discovery was merely an oversight. Worse still for her, Kruidbos will doubtless testify against her. The best she could hope for is a plea-bargain that leaves her with a felony conviction and gets her disbarred, but no prison time.

  • Spartacus

    Hope he wins. He certainly has a case, if the American justice system still works.

    • dukem1

      It has lately, in Florida.

  • IstvanIN

    They will make stuff up to get this guy if they have to.

  • John Smith

    Integrity must be a core value of government. Government employees that throw ethics out the windows to engage in political corruption and crime to accomplish political objectives must be held accountable. A criminal investigation should be launched in addition to the civil suit imo.

    • She’s already been indicted.

      • John Smith

        Seriously? Please share a link to confirm it.

      • John Smith

        I respect Larry from Judicial Watch but I don’t see this Florida Grand Jury indictment going to trial and resulting in a conviction for what she was indicted for by the Grand Jury. Unless I’m missing something, this is just an exercise in ethics.

  • panjoomby

    Dershowitz is absolutely fantastic in this. Penetrating insights spoken directly & in few words. Amazing to watch a brilliant professional speak about what they know. Bravo!

  • Sloppo

    I’ve watched a lot of people talk about this case on the Idiot Box. With very few exceptions, the blacks seem to be convinced that this case has demonstrated that they need to “change the system”. As a European American, living in a country established by other European Americans, I’m uncomfortable with the idea of Africans changing our system to one which seems more appropriate to them. It doesn’t seem logical to me because there are about 50 countries which are populated and politically controlled pretty much exclusively by blacks. If they want a country with a stronger black influence in the justice system, they have 50 to choose from with 100% black control of the justice system. Unfortunately, it seems most blacks in the US would rather reside in hell than one of those countries.

  • dd121

    The msm isn’t going to say much about this case but it will be interesting to follow it on Drudge.